welcome back, !

 

RECENT NEWS

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents.

Mr Leggett says the honours are an opportunity to recognise members of the community who give outstanding service to others.

“The recipients use their skills and energy and give their time and talents to a myriad of organisations and causes. They are serving us all by contributing to the greater good and each deserves our grateful thanks,” he said.

Severe earthquakes hit on 14 November 2016 affecting rural people in North Canterbury, Kaikōura and South Marlborough. Melva and Glenda spearheaded delivery of relief supplies to remote rural families.They teamed up with the local Rural Support Trust and Federated Farmers, to contact as many residents as they could to assess what was needed other than food.

“Melva and Glenda’s personal compassion which comes with a loving dollop of practical help, alleviated the sense of isolation and trauma families were experiencing from the Clarence to South Marlborough and the Awatere Valley,” says RWNZ Marlborough member Barbara Stuart. “They took the crisis seriously and did everything in their power to help.”

Glenda and Melva appealed to RWNZ members and the wider community for donations of crockery and dinner sets. They prepared 100 gift baskets of baking, chocolates and soft toys for children and managed to get supplies onto transport that was headed to isolated areas. They even sent a gift basket via helicopter for a family with a new-born baby, who were isolated at the top of the Awatere Valley.

 

The other honours recipients this year are Ross Beech, a farmer-environmentalist and a member of the South Marlborough Landscape Restoration Trust; Jim Thomas, a Lions Club member with a record of service to sport and who has a key role in the local Victim Support service, and Henny Vervaart, a Rotary Club member, Red Cross meals-on-wheels volunteer and a valued part of the Alzheimers Marlborough organisation.

Ends


 

 

Civic Award for Melva Robb and Glenda Robb

Monday, October 09, 2017

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents. Read More

The Justice and Electoral Committee is seeking feedback on the Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill. RWNZ's submission fully supports the Bill and its intent to prevent forced marriages from occurring in New Zealand by requiring minors aged 16 and 17 to gain approval by the Family Court in order to marry.

In our submission, RWNZ cited various international conventions and declarations of which New Zealand is a signatory or party to that do not condone forced marriage. These include the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), and the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). RWNZ expressed that the proposed amendment to New Zealand’s marriage law upholds New Zealand’s commitment to these documents.

RWNZ also noted that the law as it currently stands, which allows minors aged 16 and 17 to marry with parental consent, is insufficient in preventing forced marriage. The proposed amendment serves as a precaution to prevent parental guardians from attempting to facilitate a forced marriage.

As further information becomes available, this will be distributed to the members.

Click here to download the RWNZ submission.

Marriage Amendment Bill

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

The Justice and Electoral Committee is seeking feedback on the Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill. RWNZ's submission fully supports the Bill and its intent to prevent forced marriages from occurring in New Zealand by requiring minors aged 16 and 17 to gain approval by the Family Court in order to marry. Read More

Maternity services have come under the spotlight with the announcement that an anonymous group of midwives has sent a complaint alleging that midwifery is at a crisis point to the Health and Disability Commissioner.

The letter is now being handled by the Ministry of Health (as confirmed to the Otago Daily Times newspaper). While the contents of the 33-page letter are not known to the public, Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has concerns in two areas. 

This letter comes at a time when smaller maternity units are being threatened by closure, meaning that women living in rural areas will no longer have a choice in where they give birth and will have to go to larger urban areas away from home and family.

RWNZ can name maternity hospitals in Te Anau, Lumsden and Tutatapere in the South Island and Te Kuiti in the North that are currently under threat of closure. Government and DHB’s will claim that the services are being under-used, but the reality for newly pregnant women when they must make a choice about where they will give birth, is that the uncertainty of a smaller hospital’s future leaves them with no choice than to go to an urban area.

Rural women are already at a disadvantage with their maternity care. During the first three months of pregnancy, the midwife and the mother must come to an agreement over the number of visits made at home once the baby has been born. It is appreciated that distance and time for midwives to travel to rural areas is an issue and that the seven, or more home visits are unlikely to happen with the current level of recompense that midwives receive. Most will agree to one visit with the expectation that the mother will then be able to travel to a clinic for the aftercare that they are entitled to.

In most cases, the arrangement works unless the new mother has had a caesarean birth and is unable to drive for six weeks. Not only is she deprived of essential aftercare, in some cases they can be isolated from other support services and family. There may be further issues when the new mother is a migrant worker, or English is a second language, or where there is a variable income. The demands of seasonal farm work will often play their part too, and it is not always possible for a farmer to stop work over the six week period of midwife aftercare to transport the new mother and baby to appointments.

Government and DHB’s need to accept responsibility for optimum care for new mothers and babies at a time in life when the need for guidance and advice is crucial. The early days of a baby’s life and the ability of the mother to adapt and cope with new demands are crucial for the future health of the baby. Care delivered at this early stage is an investment in the lifetime health of a child.

Whatever the outcome from the letter the midwives have sent, it will be founded on genuine deep concern for the health of mother and babies, and Rural Women New Zealand is hopeful that their concerns will be considered with that knowledge in mind.

Rural Women New Zealand believes that all women regardless of their geographical location deserve equity of maternity services.

Note: Midwives letter referenced in Otago Daily Times, published 29 May 2017.

 

 

Concerns for equity of maternity services in rural areas

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Maternity services have come under the spotlight with the announcement that an anonymous group of midwives has sent a complaint alleging that midwifery is at a crisis point to the Health and Disability Commissioner. Read More

Here is a list of the winners of the National Conference Competitions for 2016. Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to all the entrants.

Best Provincial President Report: Sandra Curd, Mid Canterbury.

Best Branch President Report: Gendie Somerville-Ryan, Awana Branch.

International Officer Report Award (Talbot Trophy) Judged by Val Tarrant OBE Winner: Colleen Tiller, Thames Valley Provincial Region 5. Commended: Melva Robb, Marlbrough Provincial, Region 3.

ACWW Cora Wilding Competition: An English Rose

First prize: Jennie Purdon, South Taranaki
Second prize: Thelma Luxton, Motinui
Third prize: Helen Jones, Toko.

An English Rose - must be red, using any medium, for example felted, knitted, icing, ceramic, painting, or on something like a cushion, wall hanger etc. Can make a bud leaves to go with it.

Sold at Conference by silent auction for Pennies for Friendship.

 

Wool Competition:

First prize: Gwen Nicol, Skinner Road
Second prize: Margaret Vickers, Midhurst
Third prize: Diane Higgins, Brightwater

 

Four pictorial Peggy Squares. Can be knitted or crocheted 40 stitches and 80 rows of garter stitch. Double knitting wool on number 8 or 4mm knitting needles. Square to be 20cm.

Either 4 individual then stitched together as a block, or knitted or crocheted all four at once to make a block.

 

Marlborough Short Story and Olive Burdekin advanced writers:

Winner: Jennifer Gravatt for her story 'The Wireless' judged by Marion Day.

Olive Burdekin Prize
Winner: Kate Rivett Taylor for 'Twist in Time' judged by Joy Cowley.

Must start with “It all began when….” You can use your own topic and title 1000-1500 words for Marlborough Short Story and 1500- 2000 for Olive Burdekin. Please send your stories to Helen Godsiff Ferndale, RD2 Picton 7372 by the 31st August 2016.
 

Speech:

Winner: Jenny Malcolm
Second prize: Alex Thompson
Third: Peggy Lawton

 

Val Tarrant Bell open to all entrants.

Tutaenui Bell for first time participants.

Topic “I may be gone for some time….” Time 3-5 minutes.

 

Lady Blundell Trophy:

First place: Mid Canterbury Provincial, Region 2
Commended: Awana Branch, Region 7


 

 

 

 


 

 

Conference competition winners 2016

Monday, May 23, 2016

Here is a list of the winners of the National Conference Competitions for 2016. Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to all the entrants. Read More


Central Southland Provincial Rural Women have held the 34th Bride of the Year.

Entrants included 18 Brides and 9 Bridesmaids.  A successful evening was enjoyed by over 300 in attendance, lace showed in many of the wedding gowns, and a variety of colours, length and styles in the bridesmaids' dresses.

Results Bride of the Year for 2016 (photo above)

Winner: Sally Driscoll nee: O’Brien (on right)

Second: Erin Milne nee: McGimpsey (on Left)

Third: Rachael Devlin nee: Crawford (Centre)

 

Bridesmaids Final (see photo below)

 

Left No 6 Amanda Paul (Placed Third) Bridesmaid for Erin Milne

Centre No 7 Kerry O’Brien (Placed Second) Bridesmaid for Sally Driscoll

Right No 9 Lauren Edgley (Winner) Bridesmaid for Megan McGregor

 

 

Bride of the Year Heats (below)

Left No 8 Paula Eckhold nee: Crighton

Centre No 9 Catherine McFadzien nee: Butt

Right No 7 Rachael Devlin nee: Crawford

 

Brides Heats Two

Left No 14 Suzanne Taylor nee: Richards

Centre No 15 Erin Milne nee: McGimpsey

Right No 13 Hannah Jozko nee: Hamilton (Daughter of the Hokonui President Neroli and Christopher Hamilton, Hannah travelled from Christchurch to enter as did her bridesmaid.)

 

 

 

 

Bridesmaid heats

Left No 5 Paula Anderson Bridesmaid for Suzanne Taylor

Centre No 7 Kerry O’Brien Bridesmaid for Sally Driscoll

Right No 6 Amanda Paul Bridesmaid for Erin Milne


 

 


We would like to acknowledge the Fiordland Advocate for supplying the photos. 

 

Do you know of any young children who have been very ill with E.coli O157:H7?

How did they catch it? How soon after it was caught was it diagnosed? How bad was it for the child and their family? 

As a rural mother, National Councillor Fiona Gower recognises the need to keep children safe. She knows the dangers of quad bikes, tractors, water and animals as well as other hazards seen daily. But what of those that can’t be seen? Such as minute organisms hiding in mud and water and in animal urine and faeces. These are the bugs that if not dealt with can cause major illness and in some cases irreparable damage and even death. How do we protect our families from them?

Rural Women NZ members are aware of Leptospirosis thanks to fundraising and awareness campaigns. But what about Salmonella and Rotovirus? The latest of the organisms to be targeted by awareness campaigns and research is E. coli O157:H7.

What is E.coli O157?

E.coli O157:H7 (STEC or VTEC) is an intestinal pathogen that causes severe outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness with symptoms ranging from diarrhea to severe bleeding from the bowel, to renal failure leading to transplants or dialysis. It has the most severe effect on children aged under 5 with 10% of cases hospitalised. There was one death in 2014.

The most common risk factors reported for VTEC/STEC infection cases in 2014 were contact with pets, farm animals and animal manure.

  • Kids on farms can be infected with E. coli O157:H7
  • Children under 5 years old most susceptible to serious illness.

This infection has been increasing since 1997 with 187 cases notified last year.

STEC infects cattle and sheep, however animals will appear healthy.

How to keep your children safe:

  • As a veterinarian, RWNZ National Councillor Liz Hancock stresses that hygiene awareness is really important with any of these bugs. Thorough hand washing when coming inside from farm and basic hygiene (leave dirty gumboots and overalls outside) will reduce the opportunity for infection.
  • Parents need to be aware of how to try to prevent their children picking up these bugs. At this time of the year it is important to encourage hand washing, with children spending time in calf sheds and pet day animals and plenty of mud and water around. There are lots of opportunity to pick up bugs by ingestion or through the eyes and nose or cuts and grazes.
  • If a child has diarrhoea and has been in contact with animals, ask a doctor to test for E. coli O157:H7. If your child is very unwell, ask them to check for all the diseases. It is better to push for the test and be negative, than miss it and your child end up in hospital with complications from the disease.
  • Doctors who look after rural patients need to be aware of these organisms and be prepared to test.

Rural Women NZ are interested in your E.coli O157:H7 stories (names and places will be changed to ensure confidentiality) please email [email protected]. 

Contact for enquiries:

Fiona Gower
National Vice President

Rural Women NZ
Ph: 027 428 3884
Email: [email protected]  

Children and E.coli

Friday, February 05, 2016
 Read More

Rural Women New Zealand says the recent accident in Canterbury, when a teen was hit crossing the road after getting off a school bus, may have been avoided if the bus had been fitted with flashing 20K signs.

 


Rural Women New Zealand took part in a trial of new LED signs in Ashburton last year, which included a public education and police enforcement campaign. The trial proved very successful in slowing drivers and Rural Women New Zealand hopes that the signs will be approved for general use on school buses in 2015.

"Rural Women NZ has been advocating for years for public awareness and driver education around school bus safety, especially the 20K speed limit in either direction. Using technology to get the message across to drivers has been a big part of our campaign."

The ‘Either Way It’s 20K’ Ashburton trial saw a marked drop in speeds when the flashing 20K signs were operating.

“The flashing lights and illuminated signs are visible for a considerable distance, alerting drivers to slow down
especially in a 100kph zone.

"Every day motorists speed past school buses, putting children's lives at risk on rural roads and non-urban State highways," Mrs McGowan says.  

The NZ Transport Agency agrees the results of the Ashburton trial are promising, provided they are widely and consistently used on entire school bus fleets, and supported by active and widespread community engagement and publicity.

The Transport Agency is in discussions with the Ministry of Transport, the Ministry of Education and Police on the possibility of wider use of the signs from next year.

In the meantime, Rural Women New Zealand urges drivers to be more vigilant and slow down to 20kp/h when passing a school bus in either direction.

"Children of all ages can be unpredictable. It only takes a moment of inattention for a child to dart across a road without looking or misjudge the speed and distance of an approaching vehicle.”

Since 1987 23 children have been killed in New Zealand when crossing the road to or from school buses. At least 47 more have been seriously injured.

20K signs without delay call 15-Dec-2014

Monday, December 15, 2014

Rural Women New Zealand says the recent accident in Canterbury, when a teen was hit crossing the road after getting off a school bus, may have been avoided if the bus had been fitted with flashing 20K signs. Read More


Wonder how many groups taking part in Women Walk the World events around the globe were accompanied by an animal?

Near Whanganui, Harley the pet goat followed 13 Fordell-Mangamahu members all the way on their 12 kilometre trek over hilly terrain during their Women Walk the World day out.

Setting off from a farmhouse at 190 metres above sea level, the members and Harley climbed up to 434 metres over four hours, traversing typical hill country land.  They took their lunch with them and enjoyed the wonderful 360 degree views in perfect autumn weather. Not to be left out, three dogs also joined the hikers and Harley on their adventure.

The walk was one of 30 that Rural Women NZ members took part in, combining a social day in the fresh air with fundraising for the ACWW cause. In total we raised $1,931.76.  

Our Forest Reserve branch members in the far north chose to do a coastal walk at Mangawhai heads.  “Starting  at the Sandbar Cafe they climbed the stairs to the clifftop walkway.  “This walk mirrored the Troubadour’s Walk one of the walks in the hugely popular Mangawhai Walking Weekend held in March.  We enjoyed the stupendous view of the Estuary and out to sea the Hen and Chicken Islands and Little Barrier on the horizon before wending our way down a track through bush on the headland to the Estuary again.  An amble along the shore then a stiff climb up to the residential streets of Mangwhai Heads and back to the Sandbar for a drink and informal meeting.  A total of $100 was raised from a gold coin donation for the walk and an extra special trading table.  A fun day for a good cause.

North Auckland Provincial members and some husbands and friends gathered at Butler’s Point Whaling Museum at Hi Hi beach, Mangonui, to look around the museum and walk through the beautiful old gardens of the homestead, built in 1876, including 170 year old magnolia trees, says Marilyn Hutchings, provincial president.
Our smallest branches weren’t going to be left out either.  Three members from Colville in north Coromandel set off on a fine morning, riding their bikes a short distance before walking up and over the hill to Waitete Bay, where they plunged into the sea for a refreshing swim and ate lunch before retracing their footsteps back to Colville, a 16 kilometre walk in total.

Omokoroa Rural Women met at Salisbury Wharf at Mt Maunganui and after an enjoyable lunch walked along the beautiful boardwalk at Pilot Bay.

A larger group of 32 members explored the newly-opened Clutha Gold Trail in the South Island, which offers a unique heritage experience. The trail showcases the area’s history, including the earliest Maori moa hunters, Chinese gold miners and European-style farming. The walkers, from our Beaumont-Tuapeka group, rounded out their day’s activities with raffles to raise funds for ACWW and a well-deserved cup of tea.

Other walks were held in Taranaki, at Lake Mangamahoe, Dargaville during the regional conference, Thomson’s Bush on the banks of the Waihopai River near Invercargill, at Puketi coastal garden, at Butler’s Museum Kaikohe; at the Waitahora Valley by members of the Mangatoro branch; and at Mount Maunganui, where members of Te Puke-Rotoehu branch stepped out.  Cromwell branch members walked around Lake Hayes and lunched together in Arrowtown after their 10K hike.  Rukuhia and Tirau branch members walked around Lake Cameron, and Rerewhakaaiti members took a stroll around a retirement village gardens. Others groups that took part included Franklin, Oropi, Hampden, North Otago Provincial, Henley, Pokuru, Naike, Auroa, Muhuinoa East, Scotts Ferry, Mahikapawa and Omokoroa branches.  You all earned yourselves a cuppa and a big pat on the back!

Once again, Rural Women New Zealand’s Women Walk the World challenge was a great success and our members are looking forward to taking part again next year.

National council has agreed to donate $1000 from Women Walk the World to our Solomon Islands appeal.  The rest will go to ACWW’s Pennies for Friendship fund. To date we have raised $1931.76.  


Women Walk the World 2014 02-Apr-2014

Wednesday, April 02, 2014


Wonder how many groups taking part in Women Walk the World events around the globe were accompanied by an animal? Read More

Oamaru International Year of Family Farming


Our International Year of Family Farming roadshows are underway, with very successful events already held in Oamaru and Rai Valley.  Next it's on to Carterton (6 April) and Stratford (9 April)

All members of the public are welcome to come along.


The roadshows include stalls and trade stands, demonstrations, a keynote speech by Doug Avery, Landcorp Communicator of the Year in 2013, seminars, workshops and entertainment. (Full details of the programme for each venue in the links below).


Pictured is Liz Evans (above) promoting the Marlborough event at the local library.  She  stresses you don’t have to be a farmer to come along to the Rural Women NZ roadshows and enjoy yourself.


"An interest in land use, families, animals, food and personal well-being is more than enough to take part."


She says Rural Women NZ has always backed families working on the land, and in the rural communities that surround them. 


“For this reason, we were ‘first in’ to initiate a nationwide programme of events to support the UN International Year of Family Farming, a timely opportunity to celebrate the dedication and contribution of farming families, past, present and future.”


In every valley and on the plains of New Zealand, there are family-owned and operated farms. Many have been in the same family for generations, and can often be identified by local road names as people travel around New Zealand’s rural roads.


“Rural Women NZ members set a high store on family farming, especially as it tends to be these families who help contribute to the richness and spirit of community life.


“And we are seeing a renewed interest in the land by a wide range of people,” says Mrs Evans. “School children want to learn more about growing food. Teenagers are beginning to recognise a future in skilled work with animals, crops and agricultural technology, and young people already in farming families work hard for an opportunity to successfully transition to owning that farm business.


“People are beginning to think about what they can do to improve water quality, food safety and natural resources, taking a partnership approach. This can only lead to a greater sense of understanding and teamwork around farming and productivity.”


The United Nations’ aim in celebrating the year is to raise the profile of family farming and smallholder production by focusing world attention on its role in eradicating hunger, providing food security  and managing natural resources for the benefit of all.


The goal is to reposition family farming at the centre of agricultural, environmental and social policy globally – and identify efficient ways to support family farmers.


For tickets, visit our shop.

Rural Women NZ International Year of Family Farming Roadshows:

6 April - Carterton

9 April - Stratford


Media:

Marlborough

Oamaru

Six highly motivated Rural Women NZ members graduated from the Agri-Women's Development Trust Escalator course in November, after a year spent honing their skills in the areas of finance, governance and strategy, communication and leadership.


At the prestigious ceremony held in Wellington, Fiona Gower said, "At the start of the year I wasn't completely sure where it would take me, but as it went on I gained enough confidence to step up and put myself forward for a couple of roles on my local community board and the Rural Women NZ national council."


The course challenged participants to learn about themselves and realise their potential.


"The course gave me greater confidence and belief in myself, which is priceless. I really have to thank Beef+Lamb, who gave me the opportunity to attend this course through a scholarship. Without this, I do not think I would have pushed myself to attend!"


Fiona would recommend the AWDT Escalator programme for anyone considering taking on a leadership or governance role, whether in their communities or professionally. And for those just beginning their journey, the AWDT First Steps programme will give them the confidence to get started.


Pictured from left to right, Fiona Gower, Adrienne Wilcock, Michelle de Jong, Libby jones, Penny Smart, and Kate White

AWDT 2013 graduates from RWNZ 22-Jan-2014

Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Six highly motivated Rural Women NZ members graduated from the Agri-Women's Development Trust Escalator course in November, after a year spent honing their skills in the areas of finance, governance and strategy, communication and leadership. Read More

Read All NewsRecent news

Congratulations to the National Competition Winners for 2017

Tarrant Bell & Tutaenui Bell Speech contest topic: “Why Not?”

Tutaenui Bell and Tarrant Bell

1st Place Alex Thompson, Amuri Dinner Branch, Region 2

2nd Place Leona Trimble, Hampden Branch, Region 1


Marlborough Short Story & Olive Burdekin short story “ What a Fuss”

1000-1500 words for Marlborough Short Story – Kerry France, Moa Flat Branch, Region 1 for “Guess what I am.” Dominion Essay Tray and voucher from Region 3

 

1500- 2000 words for Olive Burdekin – Chrissy Sumby, Kenepuru Branch, Region 3 for “Bay Swimming” Voucher from Region 3

 

Cora Wilding- insulated Pot Stand - any medium

Melva Robb – Marlborough Provincial, 1st Place, Region 3


Olive Craig Trophy Member of Excellence (Judged by the National Board) Sue Hall Region 6


Talbot Trophy- best Provincial, Branch or Group International Officer report

International Officer - Melva Robb – Marlborough Provincial, 1st Place, Region 3

 

The Honora O’Neill Gong is for the best Provincial, Sandra Curd, Mid Canterbury Region 2

 

Branch or Group President’s Report: Carolyn McLellan, Bainham Branch Region 3

The Lady Blundell Tray Competition

for the most innovative project completed by an individual, Group, Branch, Provincial or Region.

Winner: Amuri Dinner Group.


 

National Competition Winners 2017

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Congratulations to the National Competition Winners for 2017 Read More

Rural untracked parcels change

 

From 1 February, New Zealand Post customers will see the cost of sending untracked parcels to rural addresses increase by $3.70.

This charge, which was initially only placed on Tracked, Courier and Courier Signature parcels will now also be applied to untracked parcels sent to a rural address as a means to offset fixed costs associated with deliver to rural locations.

New Zealand Post has stated that these costs are a result of the continuing decrease in letter volumes.

 

Despite ongoing cost reductions made, this change is said to be necessary to continue to operate a sustainable network.

For business account customers, the change will take effect on 1 July 2018 as set out in their contacts.

 

 

Rural Post Prices to Change

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Rural untracked parcels change
 Read More

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events.

The Rural Support Trust advise farmers to ensure stock and domestic animals have food, water, and shelter where necessary, and are secure. Ensure that all stock injuries are promptly attended too, after human needs are met.

If your farm or rural property or stock has been affected by an adverse event and you need assistance, contact your local Rural Support Trust on 0800 787 254 (0800 RURAL HELP) with information on the impacts on your farm, or requests for help.

The Rural Women New Zealand Adverse Events and Relief Fund is available to individuals, communities and groups, with a particular emphasis on rural women and children. The fund provides financial assistance to persons or groups, where there is an identified urgent need due to recent adverse events such as drought, fires, floods or earthquakes.

Click here to read more about applying for the fund.

Contact details for support agencies:

The Rural Support Trust (RST organise community events and one-on-one mentoring, as well as targeted support services in emergency situations)  
http://www.rural-support.org.nz Ph: 0800 787 254.

DairyNZ: Sharemilkers support http://www.dairynz.co.nz/farm/tactics/support-for-sharemilkers/

Federated Farmers http://www.fedfarm.org.nz/ Ph: 0800 327 646 or drought feedline 0800 376 844.

Doug Avery’s Resilient Farmer http://www.resilientfarmer.co.nz/

Farmstrong http://www.farmstrong.co.nz


If you just want to talk, or know someone who is at risk, there are a range of support options available, including counselling services:

Lifeline: 0800 543 354 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling

Youthline: 0800 376 633 or free text 234 - Provides 24 hour telephone and text counselling services for young people

Samaritans: 0800 726 666 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling.

Women's Refuge: 0800 REFUGE (733 843) a 24/7 crisis and support line provide advice and information.

Shakti New Zealand 0800SHAKTI (0800 742 584) If you are in a situation of domestic violence call our 24-hour crisis line, and multi-lingual staff will provide information.

Tautoko: 0508 828 865 - provides support, information and resources to people at risk of suicide, and their family, whānau and friends.

What'sup: 0800 942 8787 (0800 What’s Up) is a counselling helpline for children and young people, aged 5-18. Phone Mon-Fri 1-10pm, Sat-Sun 3-10pm.

Kidsline: 0800 543 754, it is a 24/7 helpline for children and teens, run by specially trained youth volunteers.

Thelowdown.co.nz - Free Text 5626, watch videos or contact for support. 

depression.org.nz National Depression Initiative (for adults), 0800 111 757 - 24 hour service 

Ministry for Children Oranga Tamariki If you're worried about a child or family that you know, there are ways you can help, contact Child, Youth and Family.

For information about suicide prevention, see http://www.spinz.org.nz .

If it is an emergency, or you feel yourself, or someone you know is at risk, please call 111.

Rural community support services

Thursday, April 06, 2017

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events. Read More

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World.

It’s a great way to come together, catch up with friends and have some fun and healthy exercise along the way.

The date for the event is Sunday 29 April– ACWW Day - though walks can take place at other dates around that time if more convenient.

Here’s What You Do:

1.Decide on a walk for your group. It can range from a stroll around the park, a hike through the bush, an amble around a neighbourhood or along a walkway.
2.Invite others. This is a great way to reach out to new potential members, and include families and friends.
3.Go to the registration form , fill it in and email [email protected] or post to national office before your walk, so we know what walks are taking place and can promote them.
4.Fund raise through sponsorship, a gold coin donation, or perhaps an afternoon tea or sausage sizzle afterwards.
5.Tally up the number of people who attend and the distance walked.
6.Take photos and send to national office so we can publicise your walks and use on our website and Facebook pages. Email [email protected]
7.Send your funds raised, and details of kilometres walked to national office.

 

 


 

More About The Work Of ACWW

ACWW connects and supports women and communities worldwide by:

• Working in partnership with member societies to offer mutual support
• Connecting at international level through UN representation
• Funding community development projects
• Supporting agricultural initiatives
Find out more about ACWW here.

Women Walk the World 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World. Read More

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.

RWNZ was one of the founding members of ACWW. It is one of the largest international development organisations for rural women.

The ACWW network allows it to engage at the local, national, and international level with the aim of achieving these goals:

- To raise the standard of living for rural women and their families through education, training and community development programmes.

- To provide practical support to our members and help them set up income-generating schemes.

- To support educational opportunities for women and girls, and help eliminate gender discrimination.

- To give rural women a voice at an international level through our links with UN agencies and bodies.

Caption: Delegates from the South Pacific Area Conference in New Plymouth complete the ACWW Walk the World event in April 2017. 

Click here to download an information booklet about ACWW (8MB PDF)

Click here to go to the ACWW website

 

ACWW Study Topic 2017

Friday, June 16, 2017

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.  Read More

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents.

Mr Leggett says the honours are an opportunity to recognise members of the community who give outstanding service to others.

“The recipients use their skills and energy and give their time and talents to a myriad of organisations and causes. They are serving us all by contributing to the greater good and each deserves our grateful thanks,” he said.

Severe earthquakes hit on 14 November 2016 affecting rural people in North Canterbury, Kaikōura and South Marlborough. Melva and Glenda spearheaded delivery of relief supplies to remote rural families.They teamed up with the local Rural Support Trust and Federated Farmers, to contact as many residents as they could to assess what was needed other than food.

“Melva and Glenda’s personal compassion which comes with a loving dollop of practical help, alleviated the sense of isolation and trauma families were experiencing from the Clarence to South Marlborough and the Awatere Valley,” says RWNZ Marlborough member Barbara Stuart. “They took the crisis seriously and did everything in their power to help.”

Glenda and Melva appealed to RWNZ members and the wider community for donations of crockery and dinner sets. They prepared 100 gift baskets of baking, chocolates and soft toys for children and managed to get supplies onto transport that was headed to isolated areas. They even sent a gift basket via helicopter for a family with a new-born baby, who were isolated at the top of the Awatere Valley.

 

The other honours recipients this year are Ross Beech, a farmer-environmentalist and a member of the South Marlborough Landscape Restoration Trust; Jim Thomas, a Lions Club member with a record of service to sport and who has a key role in the local Victim Support service, and Henny Vervaart, a Rotary Club member, Red Cross meals-on-wheels volunteer and a valued part of the Alzheimers Marlborough organisation.

Ends


 

 

Civic Award for Melva Robb and Glenda Robb

Monday, October 09, 2017

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents. Read More