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NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards will be held on the evening of Tuesday, 20 November 2018 in Wellington in the Banquet Hall at Parliament.

A review of the Enterprising Rural Women Awards has been completed by the RWNZ Board with feedback from members and participants, external advice, and the awards partners.

The awards have been renamed the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards and NZI is the Premier Partner. The categories have been broadened, the application process has been updated and the judging criteria strengthened.

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards give an outstanding opportunity to showcase your business. The event attracts extensive media coverage and promotional opportunities. All winners will receive a membership of Rural Women New Zealand for one year. All category winners will each receive $1000 in prize money and a trophy, and the Supreme Winner will receive a further $1000 in prize money.

 

“Winning the Supreme Award was such an amazing result. I am proud of my achievements and honoured to be surrounded by such inspiring, talented and strong women,”

- Debra Cruickshank of Tannacrieff Wines, Supreme winner 2017.

 

 

You can download the entry forms below, which contain information regarding entry criteria and conditions of entry. The PDF version can be downloaded, printed, filled out and scanned or posted to National Office. The Word.doc available can be electronically filled out using Microsoft Word and sent as an attachment to National Office. Please send entry forms to [email protected].

First stage entry forms (13, June – 1, August) PDF

First stage entry forms (13, June – 1, August) Word.doc


The categories for the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards 2018 are:

  • Emerging business: Awarded to a business starting out in its journey and achieving exceptional results. Open to businesses that have been running from 2 – 5 years.
  • Love of the Land: Harnessing the potential of New Zealand’s land, environment or products of the land, to create a successful business enterprise.
  • Creative Arts: A business specialising in the creative arts working in a rural environment or using rural materials.
  • Innovation: An enterprise that challenges the status quo to bring something new and innovative to the market or utilising rural resources in an innovative way.
  • Rural Champion: A person or business who champions the rural sector or a rural enterprise – an outstanding contributor who goes above and beyond the normal in their support rural enterprise. Open to anybody.
 

A Supreme winner will be chosen from all category finalists, who has shown excellence and outstanding achievement across all entry criteria.

 

Please find following the relevant dates for entries:

  • Wednesday, 13 June - Launch of awards at National Fieldays, entries open
  • Wednesday, 1 August - Entries close, first round judging starts
  • Friday, 31 August - First round judging complete
  • Saturday, 1 September - First stage finalists contacted and second round entries open
  • Sunday, 30 September - Second stage entries close
  • Monday, 1 October - Second stage judging begins.
  • Tuesday, 20 November - NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards (winners announced).

Please read the media release launching the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards here:

If you are interested in supporting the awards as a category partner, please contact [email protected].

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

Wednesday, October 03, 2018

  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release regarding our involvement to help support communities affected by the M.bovis outbreak. With 38 farms currently infected, and others under movement control, we encourage farmers to contact their local Rural Support Trust and visit MPI’s website for advice and support.

 

Read more about this here.

Read the media release below.

 

RURAL WOMEN NEW ZEALAND OFFERS FULL SUPPORT TO GOVERNMENT

 

  Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has offered their full support to the Government for communities that are affected by the Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) outbreak. This announcement was made in a meeting earlier this week with Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, Minister of Agriculture and Biosecurity Damien O’Connor, and Waikato dairy farmers, then reiterated with industry leaders.

 

“Our rural communities are really hurting in this unprecedented biosecurity outbreak – it is vital they are supported throughout this response, no matter what future plan is decided next week,” says RWNZ National President Fiona Gower.

“From what I saw on Monday and what we are hearing from our members and others in the industry, it is clear that the response to M. bovis is upsetting and we are pleased to have been able to offer our support.

“Since 1925, RWNZ members have been the glue that holds rural communities together and nearly 100 years later we continue by working with Rural Support Trusts, visiting farming families, and offering funding for adverse events.

“The decision to offer our full support comes from recent meetings with industry leaders and the Minister, and from our many years’ experience supporting rural communities.

“We are pleased that RWNZ can continue our tradition of charitable giving and we look forward to working with the Government and industry to ensure rural communities are fully supported through the M. bovis outbreak,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to hear of the death of a nine-year-old boy whilst riding a quad bike in rural Waikato last night and our thoughts are extended to friends and family.

 

“It is very sad, but it need not have occurred. We need to prevent families and friends from the heartbreak of losing a loved one in such tragic circumstances,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

 

“RWNZ are concerned on two levels, one is children riding age appropriate quad bikes unsupervised and the other is children under the age of 16 riding adult-sized quad bikes.

 

“Last nights’ incident is an unfortunate but timely reminder of manufacturers recommendations that children under the age of 16 should not be riding adult-sized quad bikes.

 

“Children do not have the weight, strength or judgement to be operating these vehicles.

 

“Or if young children are riding age appropriate quad bikes, they need to be wearing a helmet and be supervised at all times.

 

“RWNZ encourage that anyone planning to use any form of machinery on farms receive training, and learn safe practices.

 

“It is heart breaking to receive news like this,” says Ms. Gower.

 

To find the media to which we have responded, follow the link here

 

 

 

Please contact us for further information

[email protected]


 

(photo source: www.nzherald.co.nz)

 

Another Preventable Rural Tragedy

Thursday, February 01, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to hear of the death of a nine-year-old boy whilst riding a quad bike in rural Waikato last night and our thoughts are extended to friends and family. Read More

Lack of enforcement and education around freedom camping has led to ongoing issues in our rural communities says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ). 

“This summer has been great for both domestic and foreign tourists, however, freedom camping has once again caused angst in our rural communities,” says Fiona Gower, National President.

 

“Overseas experience shows us that farms can be affected by disease outbreak (such as E. coli) through waste left behind by freedom campers and any loss of income is not acceptable to farming families.

 

“Adverse effects on human health and that of our environment are clearly issues for all New Zealanders.

 

“RWNZ supports the concerns of those communities affected by large numbers of disrespectful freedom campers, especially in tourist hot spots such as Queenstown, Wanaka and others.

 

“RWNZ believes that the government needs to ensure that the legislation is fit for purpose so that rural areas especially road reserve, paper roads and private land are protected from the adverse effects of freedom camping,” says Ms Gower.



To read the article to which RWNZ responded, follow this link

 

For further information, please contact

[email protected]


FREEDOM CAMPING OUT OF SORTS

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Lack of enforcement and education around freedom camping has led to ongoing issues in our rural communities says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).   Read More

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents.

Mr Leggett says the honours are an opportunity to recognise members of the community who give outstanding service to others.

“The recipients use their skills and energy and give their time and talents to a myriad of organisations and causes. They are serving us all by contributing to the greater good and each deserves our grateful thanks,” he said.

Severe earthquakes hit on 14 November 2016 affecting rural people in North Canterbury, Kaikōura and South Marlborough. Melva and Glenda spearheaded delivery of relief supplies to remote rural families.They teamed up with the local Rural Support Trust and Federated Farmers, to contact as many residents as they could to assess what was needed other than food.

“Melva and Glenda’s personal compassion which comes with a loving dollop of practical help, alleviated the sense of isolation and trauma families were experiencing from the Clarence to South Marlborough and the Awatere Valley,” says RWNZ Marlborough member Barbara Stuart. “They took the crisis seriously and did everything in their power to help.”

Glenda and Melva appealed to RWNZ members and the wider community for donations of crockery and dinner sets. They prepared 100 gift baskets of baking, chocolates and soft toys for children and managed to get supplies onto transport that was headed to isolated areas. They even sent a gift basket via helicopter for a family with a new-born baby, who were isolated at the top of the Awatere Valley.

 

The other honours recipients this year are Ross Beech, a farmer-environmentalist and a member of the South Marlborough Landscape Restoration Trust; Jim Thomas, a Lions Club member with a record of service to sport and who has a key role in the local Victim Support service, and Henny Vervaart, a Rotary Club member, Red Cross meals-on-wheels volunteer and a valued part of the Alzheimers Marlborough organisation.

Ends


 

 

Civic Award for Melva Robb and Glenda Robb

Monday, October 09, 2017

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents. Read More

The Justice and Electoral Committee is seeking feedback on the Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill. RWNZ's submission fully supports the Bill and its intent to prevent forced marriages from occurring in New Zealand by requiring minors aged 16 and 17 to gain approval by the Family Court in order to marry.

In our submission, RWNZ cited various international conventions and declarations of which New Zealand is a signatory or party to that do not condone forced marriage. These include the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), and the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). RWNZ expressed that the proposed amendment to New Zealand’s marriage law upholds New Zealand’s commitment to these documents.

RWNZ also noted that the law as it currently stands, which allows minors aged 16 and 17 to marry with parental consent, is insufficient in preventing forced marriage. The proposed amendment serves as a precaution to prevent parental guardians from attempting to facilitate a forced marriage.

As further information becomes available, this will be distributed to the members.

Click here to download the RWNZ submission.

Marriage Amendment Bill

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

The Justice and Electoral Committee is seeking feedback on the Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill. RWNZ's submission fully supports the Bill and its intent to prevent forced marriages from occurring in New Zealand by requiring minors aged 16 and 17 to gain approval by the Family Court in order to marry. Read More

Maternity services have come under the spotlight with the announcement that an anonymous group of midwives has sent a complaint alleging that midwifery is at a crisis point to the Health and Disability Commissioner.

The letter is now being handled by the Ministry of Health (as confirmed to the Otago Daily Times newspaper). While the contents of the 33-page letter are not known to the public, Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has concerns in two areas. 

This letter comes at a time when smaller maternity units are being threatened by closure, meaning that women living in rural areas will no longer have a choice in where they give birth and will have to go to larger urban areas away from home and family.

RWNZ can name maternity hospitals in Te Anau, Lumsden and Tutatapere in the South Island and Te Kuiti in the North that are currently under threat of closure. Government and DHB’s will claim that the services are being under-used, but the reality for newly pregnant women when they must make a choice about where they will give birth, is that the uncertainty of a smaller hospital’s future leaves them with no choice than to go to an urban area.

Rural women are already at a disadvantage with their maternity care. During the first three months of pregnancy, the midwife and the mother must come to an agreement over the number of visits made at home once the baby has been born. It is appreciated that distance and time for midwives to travel to rural areas is an issue and that the seven, or more home visits are unlikely to happen with the current level of recompense that midwives receive. Most will agree to one visit with the expectation that the mother will then be able to travel to a clinic for the aftercare that they are entitled to.

In most cases, the arrangement works unless the new mother has had a caesarean birth and is unable to drive for six weeks. Not only is she deprived of essential aftercare, in some cases they can be isolated from other support services and family. There may be further issues when the new mother is a migrant worker, or English is a second language, or where there is a variable income. The demands of seasonal farm work will often play their part too, and it is not always possible for a farmer to stop work over the six week period of midwife aftercare to transport the new mother and baby to appointments.

Government and DHB’s need to accept responsibility for optimum care for new mothers and babies at a time in life when the need for guidance and advice is crucial. The early days of a baby’s life and the ability of the mother to adapt and cope with new demands are crucial for the future health of the baby. Care delivered at this early stage is an investment in the lifetime health of a child.

Whatever the outcome from the letter the midwives have sent, it will be founded on genuine deep concern for the health of mother and babies, and Rural Women New Zealand is hopeful that their concerns will be considered with that knowledge in mind.

Rural Women New Zealand believes that all women regardless of their geographical location deserve equity of maternity services.

Note: Midwives letter referenced in Otago Daily Times, published 29 May 2017.

 

 

Concerns for equity of maternity services in rural areas

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Maternity services have come under the spotlight with the announcement that an anonymous group of midwives has sent a complaint alleging that midwifery is at a crisis point to the Health and Disability Commissioner. Read More

Here is a list of the winners of the National Conference Competitions for 2016. Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to all the entrants.

Best Provincial President Report: Sandra Curd, Mid Canterbury.

Best Branch President Report: Gendie Somerville-Ryan, Awana Branch.

International Officer Report Award (Talbot Trophy) Judged by Val Tarrant OBE Winner: Colleen Tiller, Thames Valley Provincial Region 5. Commended: Melva Robb, Marlbrough Provincial, Region 3.

ACWW Cora Wilding Competition: An English Rose

First prize: Jennie Purdon, South Taranaki
Second prize: Thelma Luxton, Motinui
Third prize: Helen Jones, Toko.

An English Rose - must be red, using any medium, for example felted, knitted, icing, ceramic, painting, or on something like a cushion, wall hanger etc. Can make a bud leaves to go with it.

Sold at Conference by silent auction for Pennies for Friendship.

 

Wool Competition:

First prize: Gwen Nicol, Skinner Road
Second prize: Margaret Vickers, Midhurst
Third prize: Diane Higgins, Brightwater

 

Four pictorial Peggy Squares. Can be knitted or crocheted 40 stitches and 80 rows of garter stitch. Double knitting wool on number 8 or 4mm knitting needles. Square to be 20cm.

Either 4 individual then stitched together as a block, or knitted or crocheted all four at once to make a block.

 

Marlborough Short Story and Olive Burdekin advanced writers:

Winner: Jennifer Gravatt for her story 'The Wireless' judged by Marion Day.

Olive Burdekin Prize
Winner: Kate Rivett Taylor for 'Twist in Time' judged by Joy Cowley.

Must start with “It all began when….” You can use your own topic and title 1000-1500 words for Marlborough Short Story and 1500- 2000 for Olive Burdekin. Please send your stories to Helen Godsiff Ferndale, RD2 Picton 7372 by the 31st August 2016.
 

Speech:

Winner: Jenny Malcolm
Second prize: Alex Thompson
Third: Peggy Lawton

 

Val Tarrant Bell open to all entrants.

Tutaenui Bell for first time participants.

Topic “I may be gone for some time….” Time 3-5 minutes.

 

Lady Blundell Trophy:

First place: Mid Canterbury Provincial, Region 2
Commended: Awana Branch, Region 7


 

 

 

 


 

 

Conference competition winners 2016

Monday, May 23, 2016

Here is a list of the winners of the National Conference Competitions for 2016. Congratulations to all the winners and thank you to all the entrants. Read More


Central Southland Provincial Rural Women have held the 34th Bride of the Year.

Entrants included 18 Brides and 9 Bridesmaids.  A successful evening was enjoyed by over 300 in attendance, lace showed in many of the wedding gowns, and a variety of colours, length and styles in the bridesmaids' dresses.

Results Bride of the Year for 2016 (photo above)

Winner: Sally Driscoll nee: O’Brien (on right)

Second: Erin Milne nee: McGimpsey (on Left)

Third: Rachael Devlin nee: Crawford (Centre)

 

Bridesmaids Final (see photo below)

 

Left No 6 Amanda Paul (Placed Third) Bridesmaid for Erin Milne

Centre No 7 Kerry O’Brien (Placed Second) Bridesmaid for Sally Driscoll

Right No 9 Lauren Edgley (Winner) Bridesmaid for Megan McGregor

 

 

Bride of the Year Heats (below)

Left No 8 Paula Eckhold nee: Crighton

Centre No 9 Catherine McFadzien nee: Butt

Right No 7 Rachael Devlin nee: Crawford

 

Brides Heats Two

Left No 14 Suzanne Taylor nee: Richards

Centre No 15 Erin Milne nee: McGimpsey

Right No 13 Hannah Jozko nee: Hamilton (Daughter of the Hokonui President Neroli and Christopher Hamilton, Hannah travelled from Christchurch to enter as did her bridesmaid.)

 

 

 

 

Bridesmaid heats

Left No 5 Paula Anderson Bridesmaid for Suzanne Taylor

Centre No 7 Kerry O’Brien Bridesmaid for Sally Driscoll

Right No 6 Amanda Paul Bridesmaid for Erin Milne


 

 


We would like to acknowledge the Fiordland Advocate for supplying the photos. 

 

Do you know of any young children who have been very ill with E.coli O157:H7?

How did they catch it? How soon after it was caught was it diagnosed? How bad was it for the child and their family? 

As a rural mother, National Councillor Fiona Gower recognises the need to keep children safe. She knows the dangers of quad bikes, tractors, water and animals as well as other hazards seen daily. But what of those that can’t be seen? Such as minute organisms hiding in mud and water and in animal urine and faeces. These are the bugs that if not dealt with can cause major illness and in some cases irreparable damage and even death. How do we protect our families from them?

Rural Women NZ members are aware of Leptospirosis thanks to fundraising and awareness campaigns. But what about Salmonella and Rotovirus? The latest of the organisms to be targeted by awareness campaigns and research is E. coli O157:H7.

What is E.coli O157?

E.coli O157:H7 (STEC or VTEC) is an intestinal pathogen that causes severe outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness with symptoms ranging from diarrhea to severe bleeding from the bowel, to renal failure leading to transplants or dialysis. It has the most severe effect on children aged under 5 with 10% of cases hospitalised. There was one death in 2014.

The most common risk factors reported for VTEC/STEC infection cases in 2014 were contact with pets, farm animals and animal manure.

  • Kids on farms can be infected with E. coli O157:H7
  • Children under 5 years old most susceptible to serious illness.

This infection has been increasing since 1997 with 187 cases notified last year.

STEC infects cattle and sheep, however animals will appear healthy.

How to keep your children safe:

  • As a veterinarian, RWNZ National Councillor Liz Hancock stresses that hygiene awareness is really important with any of these bugs. Thorough hand washing when coming inside from farm and basic hygiene (leave dirty gumboots and overalls outside) will reduce the opportunity for infection.
  • Parents need to be aware of how to try to prevent their children picking up these bugs. At this time of the year it is important to encourage hand washing, with children spending time in calf sheds and pet day animals and plenty of mud and water around. There are lots of opportunity to pick up bugs by ingestion or through the eyes and nose or cuts and grazes.
  • If a child has diarrhoea and has been in contact with animals, ask a doctor to test for E. coli O157:H7. If your child is very unwell, ask them to check for all the diseases. It is better to push for the test and be negative, than miss it and your child end up in hospital with complications from the disease.
  • Doctors who look after rural patients need to be aware of these organisms and be prepared to test.

Rural Women NZ are interested in your E.coli O157:H7 stories (names and places will be changed to ensure confidentiality) please email [email protected]. 

Contact for enquiries:

Fiona Gower
National Vice President

Rural Women NZ
Ph: 027 428 3884
Email: [email protected]  

Children and E.coli

Friday, February 05, 2016
 Read More

Read All NewsRecent news


 

WINNERS OF THE NZ GUILD OF AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISTS AND COMMUNICATORS ANNOUNCED

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) presented two awards at the 60th New Zealand Guild of Agricultural Journalists and Communicators Awards (Guild's).

“RWNZ believes that the Guild’s are an important opportunity to recognise the talent which connects and strengthens New Zealand’s rural communities,” says National Chair, Penny Mudford.

“As an organisation, we sponsored two awards at this year’s Guilds – the Rural Connectivity Award and the RWNZ Journalism Award.

“RWNZ established the Rural Connectivity Award to recognise the importance of connectivity to rural communities and agri-businesses in rural areas, celebrating journalism that helps raise awareness about the issues and benefits of rural connectivity.

“This year, Gerald Piddock of Stuff NZ wins the Rural Connectivity Award for his work on how strengthening connections in rural communities is a way of supporting and attracting new farmers to the industry.

“The Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award was established to recognise the important contribution women make (and have always made) in the rural community, either through their role in the farming sector or to the general rural environment, in its broadest interpretation.

“Carol Stiles of Radio New Zealand’s Country Life Programme, wins the Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award 2018 for her work on broadcasts which highlighted how one women’s dream of sheep farming came to fruition and another who is changing the lives of retired farm dogs.

“RWNZ is proud to be involved with the Guild’s and look forward to hearing and seeing more from the entrants and winners who grow, connect and support our rural communities,” says Ms Mudford.

Ends

For more information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Rural Women New Zealand

National Office

[email protected]

 

 

 

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria. 

 

 

RURAL SCHOOL BUS SERVICE REVIEW NEEDED

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is calling for a review of the school bus eligibility criteria, particularly in the rural areas.

“The safest way for children to get to school in rural New Zealand is by bus, however, the current eligibility criteria for the service means that children are being put in dangerous situations,” says Education Portfolio Convenor and Board Member, Sue Higgins.

“If children live within two kilometres of a rural school they are not eligible for the local bus service where there is one, and are forced to walk or cycle on roads with no shoulders, often used by logging trucks, stock trucks and milk tankers, making it treacherous for our children.

“RWNZ understands that parents are responsible for ensuring their children go to school, however, the rural bus is vital for farming families who have both a busy working life and distance, for those who live further away, to contend with.

“A review of the criteria applied to children’s eligibility for their local rural school bus service is needed – school by school.

“It’s time the Government showed leadership on keeping our rural children safe on their journey to and from school,” says Mrs Higgins.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 

Rural school bus service review needed.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria.  Read More

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit. 

 

MEDIA RELEASE

16 August 2018
For immediate release

 

RURAL MATERNITY CARE IN CRISIS

The downgrading of maternity care in rural Otago and Southland will be catastrophic says Rural Women New Zealand(RWNZ).

“On top of the news that Lumsden’s birthing unit has been downgraded to a pre- and post-natal care unit, RWNZ understands that Wanaka has lost its bid to have a primary birthing unit and this does not bode well for rural communities,” says Board Member and Health Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Whilst RWNZ is somewhat pleased that Lumsden will retain care facilities for any woman with pre- and post-natal needs, women ready to give birth will need to travel at least 50 kilometres to the nearest delivery suite.

“Wanaka is expecting 200 births this coming year and there will be no primary birthing unit, and like Lumsden, will become a hub.

“The Otago-Southland region has a huge hinterland with many young parents who are choosing to have families and raise them in this wonderful part of the world and are at risk due to distance from the maternity care they are entitled to.

"No consideration has been given to those parents who have needed the services provided at Lumsden and already travelling up to two hours, now having an extra 50 kilometres added.

“When assessing maternity needs there is always two lives to consider, the mother and the child, and its outrageous that at the time in their lives when they should be close to their families they are not able to be, due to poor decision-making.

“It is not acceptable that pregnant women in rural areas of the South Island are now miles away from anywhere that can support them to have safe births, something a rural impact analysis would have highlighted.

“It’s time the Government and DHB ensured rural communities have the same access to maternity care as urban communities expect,” says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

For more information, please contact National Office.

[email protected]

04 473 5524

 

 

 

 

 

Rural maternity care in crisis

Thursday, August 16, 2018

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit.  Read More

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

New Zealand's farming women celebrating 125 years on

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

 

 

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards will be held on the evening of Tuesday, 20 November 2018 in Wellington in the Banquet Hall at Parliament.

A review of the Enterprising Rural Women Awards has been completed by the RWNZ Board with feedback from members and participants, external advice, and the awards partners.

The awards have been renamed the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards and NZI is the Premier Partner. The categories have been broadened, the application process has been updated and the judging criteria strengthened.

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards give an outstanding opportunity to showcase your business. The event attracts extensive media coverage and promotional opportunities. All winners will receive a membership of Rural Women New Zealand for one year. All category winners will each receive $1000 in prize money and a trophy, and the Supreme Winner will receive a further $1000 in prize money.

 

“Winning the Supreme Award was such an amazing result. I am proud of my achievements and honoured to be surrounded by such inspiring, talented and strong women,”

- Debra Cruickshank of Tannacrieff Wines, Supreme winner 2017.

 

 

You can download the entry forms below, which contain information regarding entry criteria and conditions of entry. The PDF version can be downloaded, printed, filled out and scanned or posted to National Office. The Word.doc available can be electronically filled out using Microsoft Word and sent as an attachment to National Office. Please send entry forms to [email protected].

First stage entry forms (13, June – 1, August) PDF

First stage entry forms (13, June – 1, August) Word.doc


The categories for the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards 2018 are:

  • Emerging business: Awarded to a business starting out in its journey and achieving exceptional results. Open to businesses that have been running from 2 – 5 years.
  • Love of the Land: Harnessing the potential of New Zealand’s land, environment or products of the land, to create a successful business enterprise.
  • Creative Arts: A business specialising in the creative arts working in a rural environment or using rural materials.
  • Innovation: An enterprise that challenges the status quo to bring something new and innovative to the market or utilising rural resources in an innovative way.
  • Rural Champion: A person or business who champions the rural sector or a rural enterprise – an outstanding contributor who goes above and beyond the normal in their support rural enterprise. Open to anybody.
 

A Supreme winner will be chosen from all category finalists, who has shown excellence and outstanding achievement across all entry criteria.

 

Please find following the relevant dates for entries:

  • Wednesday, 13 June - Launch of awards at National Fieldays, entries open
  • Wednesday, 1 August - Entries close, first round judging starts
  • Friday, 31 August - First round judging complete
  • Saturday, 1 September - First stage finalists contacted and second round entries open
  • Sunday, 30 September - Second stage entries close
  • Monday, 1 October - Second stage judging begins.
  • Tuesday, 20 November - NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards (winners announced).

Please read the media release launching the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards here:

If you are interested in supporting the awards as a category partner, please contact [email protected].

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

Wednesday, October 03, 2018

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