welcome back, !

 

RECENT NEWS

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

 

RWNZ has released a media release responding to the introduction of the 5G network in New Zealand.

 

Please read relevant media here.

 

RURAL COMMUNITIES DESERVE BETTER TECHNOLOGY

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are concerned that the roll-out of the 5G network short-changes rural New Zealand as many still struggle with basic cell phone coverage.

“The news that 5G cell phone technology will be rolled out by 2020 is great for some but not for all, and that is what bothers us,” says RWNZ Board Member and Technology Portfolio Convenor, Rachael Dean.

“Many of our rural communities do not have internet or cell phone access at all, let alone that of a high quality standard and the 5G roll-out seems yet another example of doing the easy stuff at the expense of rural New Zealand.

“Approximately half of New Zealand has no cell phone coverage due to geography which leads to isolation and inability to connect in this ever-increasing digital world – and this is not good enough.

“Rural New Zealand deserves high quality technology given the economy’s reliance on primary industries and tourism based in rural areas.

“New Zealand cannot afford for anyone to be left behind in the digital age.

“This lack of consideration of the impact on rural New Zealand is why it is so important for businesses and the Government to rural proof their decisions,” says Ms Dean.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact National Office. 

 

National Office 

Rural Women New Zealand
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

RURAL WOMEN RENEW CALL FOR BUS SIGNS

 

RWNZ have released a press release calling for changes to be made to improve the safety of children, especially those living in rural areas. 

 

As schools return this week, Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is reminding drivers about their legal responsibilities and renewing their call for mandatory signage and flashing lights on school buses.

 

“RWNZ urges the new Government to implement mandatory 20km/h signs and flashing lights on school buses, especially given recent trials have proven both are vital to reducing the speed of traffic passing school buses,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

 

“Rural children are especially vulnerable when drivers speed past school buses, and children have been involved in a number of serious and fatal incidents.

 

“We are back into the swing of the school year, and drivers must remember to follow the Road Code and slow down to 20km/h when passing a school bus that has stopped to pick-up or drop-off children.

 

“As advocates of safer rural roads, RWNZ also asks drivers to watch out for children cycling or walking to school, particularly along highways and main roads, and always remember to slow down to the speed limits indicated in school zones.

 

“It is time to up the game with keeping our rural children safe – let's just do it,” says Ms Gower.'

 

For further information, please contact:

 

[email protected]

 

 

Rural Women Renew Call For Bus Signs

Wednesday, February 07, 2018

 Read More

 

RURAL WOMEN NEED EQUAL PAY TOO

 

Women working in the rural sector need to be included in the discussions of the reconvened Joint Working Group on Pay Equity Principles says Rural Women New Zealand.

 

“Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) welcomes the news that the government is keeping its promise to reduce the gender pay gap, and we hope that by reconvening work on this, they include women in the rural sector,” says Board Chair, Penny Mudford.

 

“The rural sector is male-dominated, there is no doubting that, and our rural women have been working alongside and amongst men as partners for a long time, however for little or no financial reward.

 

“There are many factors affecting salaries and wages of rural women, some which are particular to our farming women, particularly when they are also the primary caregiver.

 

“RWNZ urges the Joint Working Group to consider principles which will reduce the gender pay gap in our farming sector,” says Ms Mudford.

 

 

To read the article to which RWNZ responded, follow this link

 

Please contact us for further information

[email protected]

 

(Image source: www.scoop.co.nz)

 

 

Rural Women Deserve Equal Pay Too

Thursday, January 25, 2018

  Read More

ACWW Country of Study 2018:

We are pleased to announce that the ACWW Country of Study for this year is Iceland. We hope you enjoy learning as much as you can about this diverse and interesting country.

 

Fun fact: Mosquitoes do not exist in Iceland. Find out other curious facts about Iceland.

 

RWNZ was one of the founding members of ACWW. It is one of the largest international development organisations for rural women.

The ACWW network allows it to engage at the local, national, and international level with the aim of achieving these goals:

- To raise the standard of living for rural women and their families through education, training and community development programmes.

- To provide practical support to our members and help them set up income-generating schemes.

- To support educational opportunities for women and girls, and help eliminate gender discrimination.

- To give rural women a voice at an international level through our links with UN agencies and bodies.


 

We look forward to hearing how the Branches and members choose to learn more about Iceland and find fun and novel ways to share and learn together.

 

ACWW 2018 Country of Study

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

ACWW Country of Study 2018:

We are pleased to announce that the ACWW Country of Study for this year is Iceland. We hope you enjoy learning as much as you can about this diverse and interesting country.

 

Fun fact: Mosquitoes do not exist in Iceland. Find out other curious facts about Iceland.

 

RWNZ was one of the founding members of ACWW. It is one of the largest international development organisations for rural women.

The ACWW network allows it to engage at the local, national, and international level with the aim of achieving these goals:

- To raise the standard of living for rural women and their families through education, training and community development programmes.

- To provide practical support to our members and help them set up income-generating schemes.

- To support educational opportunities for women and girls, and help eliminate gender discrimination.

- To give rural women a voice at an international level through our links with UN agencies and bodies.


 

We look forward to hearing how the Branches and members choose to learn more about Iceland and find fun and novel ways to share and learn together.

 

 Read More

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.

RWNZ was one of the founding members of ACWW. It is one of the largest international development organisations for rural women.

The ACWW network allows it to engage at the local, national, and international level with the aim of achieving these goals:

- To raise the standard of living for rural women and their families through education, training and community development programmes.

- To provide practical support to our members and help them set up income-generating schemes.

- To support educational opportunities for women and girls, and help eliminate gender discrimination.

- To give rural women a voice at an international level through our links with UN agencies and bodies.

Caption: Delegates from the South Pacific Area Conference in New Plymouth complete the ACWW Walk the World event in April 2017. 

Click here to download an information booklet about ACWW (8MB PDF)

Click here to go to the ACWW website

 

ACWW Study Topic 2017

Friday, June 16, 2017

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.  Read More

The sole Remit at the RWNZ AGM in 2016 was about dog safety, and proposed that dog safety education be a requirement for kindergarten and primary school children.

The issue was discussed at conference and South Canterbury Provincial RWNZ have already ordered 30 books about dog safety to go to all South Canterbury kindergartens and pre-schools.
The book illustrates nine important lessons to help keep children safe around dogs. The story outlines what happens when characters Sam and Susan get a dog, and the basic rules of canine behaviour. After reading the book children will quickly understand why dogs react the way they do and what to do to stay safe.
The book is interactive and fun for young children and can be ordered direct from author Pauline Blomfield
E-mail: [email protected] Cost $15 plus postage.
Please mention you are with RWNZ and Pauline will keep track of which regions have books.
A pamphlet also available for 50 cents and has a good summary of what is in book and can be ordered direct from
author Pauline Blomfield. E-mail: [email protected] For more information go to: www.dogsafety.govt.nz

 

Dog Safety

Friday, January 13, 2017

The sole Remit at the RWNZ AGM in 2016 was about dog safety, and proposed that dog safety education be a requirement for kindergarten and primary school children.  Read More

RWNZ have also been fundraising through the sale of aftersocks™ to help people affected by the earthquakes. 360 pairs of aftersocks™ have been sold in four weeks, and the total sales and donations have exceeded $12,000.

To buy a pair of aftersocks™ and support your community, go to the RWNZ Shop.

The Country Women’s Association (CWA) of New South Wales (NSW) have also generously donated $50,000 to the fund.

"For many women, children and families affected by the earthquake it will be a difficult Christmas. CWA of NSW members recently demonstrated concern for the welfare of these families and are truly hoping to spread a little joy through their donation of $50,000, says Annette Turner State President of CWA of NSW.

“The Country Women's Association of NSW and RWNZ share a long and proud history. In April 2017 the Associated Country Women of the World will be holding the South Pacific Triennial conference in NZ of which many CWA of NSW members will be attending as well."

The RWNZ Adverse Events and Relief Fund grants can be applied for from today. The fund is available to individuals, communities and groups to apply for, with a particular emphasis on rural women and children. Click here for the application information.

All requests for funding will be reviewed by the committee: RWNZ Board member, Margaret Pittaway Region 1, Sharron Davie-Martin, Trustee of the Rural Support Trust, Region 2 and Area Leadership Councillor, Melva Robb Region 3. The ex-officio are National President Fiona Gower and National Finance Chair, Rachael Dean.

Many thanks to former Prime Minister John Key who modelled the socks at a Federated Farmers event in Waikato in early December, with thanks also to RWNZ Board Member Janet Williams (pictured). Photo credit: Barbara Kuriger.

 

 

Donate to RWNZ's Adverse Events Relief Fund
The funds are used for emergency purposes and will also be available to support people in coming months. To donate to the fund please deposit money into:
RWNZ Bank Account: 06 0501-0778590-00 ref. earthquake. To access the fund contact us


To access funds or grants see information below: 


RWNZ Adverse Events and Relief Fund
To provide financial assistance to persons or groups where there is an identified urgent need due the recent earthquakes.

 

Grants may be awarded as follows:

To assist families in time of natural disaster.
To assist the elderly, the young or any family or person for their particular need.
To assist community groups and organisations in need.

Click here to download the application information.  

 


RWNZ Community Fund
 A fund to provide help to persons or groups . To assist families in time of nature disaster, to assist the elderly, the young or any family or person for their particular need.

Eligibility criteria: Applications by RWNZ members only, but may be made on behalf of another person or group. Applications Considered: At each RWNZ Council meeting. In matters of urgency the President and Finance Chair in consultation may make an immediate grant. Value: Up to $1,000 per grant. Click here for full criteria and application details.

Scotlands Te Kiteroa Charitable Grant
Grants are primarily directed towards individuals, groups and organisations in country areas and rural towns. Grants are made for projects and activities in the following categories: children, care, elderly, community, conservation, counselling, education, up to a maximum grant of $1,500. Applications close: 18 December. Value: $1,500. Click here for application form.

 

 

Each year classrooms teach health to children throughout New Zealand. This year they expect to teach more than 260,000 children from 1,500 schools.

In rural areas approximately 80% of children aged 6-13 years will participate in lessons with Harold the Giraffe this year, learning about what it means to be a good friend, how to have a healthy diet and how to keep themselves safe, to name just a few topics.

“We’re absolutely thrilled Rural Women New Zealand have chosen to support Life Education Trust as their national project this year. Rural Women New Zealand have been an important part of our history, spanning back 28 years, and the challenges for children growing up today are certainly no less than in 1988,” says John O’Connell, Chief Executive of Life Education Trust (NZ).

“We’re really looking forward to working together with Rural Women New Zealand and getting out to meet as many of you as possible, working together in partnership for the children of New Zealand.”

------

Rural Women New Zealand request all branches and groups fundraise for the Life Education Trust and send their monies to National Office of Rural Women New Zealand. The total raised will be given to Life Education Trust to share among their community trusts around New Zealand. 

National Project: Life Education Trust

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Each year classrooms teach health to children throughout New Zealand. This year they expect to teach more than 260,000 children from 1,500 schools. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand members can feel proud of their organisation’s achievements in its 90th year. 

You have been fundraising, baking and knitting for a variety of causes, including rescue helicopters, ambulance services, women’s refuges, rural firefighters, education providers and seasonal workers. Poppies were knitted and donated to the WW1 Centenary project and are on display at Waiouru Museum.

The work continues to improve the social and economic outcomes for rural women and their communities. This year many of you attended seminars raising awareness of the signs of family violence in rural communities. The New Zealand Parliament was lobbied to amend the Domestic Violence Act 1995 to explicitly allow the protection of animals. Campaigning continues on school bus speed restrictions, equity in health services, education and access to broadband.

This festive season, many farming families are under pressure due to financial strains resulting from adverse events such as drought, increased fire risk and low dairy pay-outs. Mental well-being and farm safety have been topics of discussion. Rural Women New Zealand also acknowledge the recent intense media coverage focused on farming practices.

Rural Women New Zealand's vision is to be a positive influence on the environment for rural women and their communities. I urge you to connect with your rural community and show your support for farming families who may be experiencing difficult times or need company over the festive season.

Photo: The 90th birthday cake was made by Melva Robb and cut by Jeanette, Kath and Peggy.
 

 

90th Anniversary end of year recap

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Rural Women New Zealand members can feel proud of their organisation’s achievements in its 90th year.  Read More

Read All NewsRecent news


 

WINNERS OF THE NZ GUILD OF AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISTS AND COMMUNICATORS ANNOUNCED

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) presented two awards at the 60th New Zealand Guild of Agricultural Journalists and Communicators Awards (Guild's).

“RWNZ believes that the Guild’s are an important opportunity to recognise the talent which connects and strengthens New Zealand’s rural communities,” says National Chair, Penny Mudford.

“As an organisation, we sponsored two awards at this year’s Guilds – the Rural Connectivity Award and the RWNZ Journalism Award.

“RWNZ established the Rural Connectivity Award to recognise the importance of connectivity to rural communities and agri-businesses in rural areas, celebrating journalism that helps raise awareness about the issues and benefits of rural connectivity.

“This year, Gerald Piddock of Stuff NZ wins the Rural Connectivity Award for his work on how strengthening connections in rural communities is a way of supporting and attracting new farmers to the industry.

“The Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award was established to recognise the important contribution women make (and have always made) in the rural community, either through their role in the farming sector or to the general rural environment, in its broadest interpretation.

“Carol Stiles of Radio New Zealand’s Country Life Programme, wins the Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award 2018 for her work on broadcasts which highlighted how one women’s dream of sheep farming came to fruition and another who is changing the lives of retired farm dogs.

“RWNZ is proud to be involved with the Guild’s and look forward to hearing and seeing more from the entrants and winners who grow, connect and support our rural communities,” says Ms Mudford.

Ends

For more information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Rural Women New Zealand

National Office

[email protected]

 

 

 

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria. 

 

 

RURAL SCHOOL BUS SERVICE REVIEW NEEDED

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is calling for a review of the school bus eligibility criteria, particularly in the rural areas.

“The safest way for children to get to school in rural New Zealand is by bus, however, the current eligibility criteria for the service means that children are being put in dangerous situations,” says Education Portfolio Convenor and Board Member, Sue Higgins.

“If children live within two kilometres of a rural school they are not eligible for the local bus service where there is one, and are forced to walk or cycle on roads with no shoulders, often used by logging trucks, stock trucks and milk tankers, making it treacherous for our children.

“RWNZ understands that parents are responsible for ensuring their children go to school, however, the rural bus is vital for farming families who have both a busy working life and distance, for those who live further away, to contend with.

“A review of the criteria applied to children’s eligibility for their local rural school bus service is needed – school by school.

“It’s time the Government showed leadership on keeping our rural children safe on their journey to and from school,” says Mrs Higgins.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 

Rural school bus service review needed.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria.  Read More

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit. 

 

MEDIA RELEASE

16 August 2018
For immediate release

 

RURAL MATERNITY CARE IN CRISIS

The downgrading of maternity care in rural Otago and Southland will be catastrophic says Rural Women New Zealand(RWNZ).

“On top of the news that Lumsden’s birthing unit has been downgraded to a pre- and post-natal care unit, RWNZ understands that Wanaka has lost its bid to have a primary birthing unit and this does not bode well for rural communities,” says Board Member and Health Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Whilst RWNZ is somewhat pleased that Lumsden will retain care facilities for any woman with pre- and post-natal needs, women ready to give birth will need to travel at least 50 kilometres to the nearest delivery suite.

“Wanaka is expecting 200 births this coming year and there will be no primary birthing unit, and like Lumsden, will become a hub.

“The Otago-Southland region has a huge hinterland with many young parents who are choosing to have families and raise them in this wonderful part of the world and are at risk due to distance from the maternity care they are entitled to.

"No consideration has been given to those parents who have needed the services provided at Lumsden and already travelling up to two hours, now having an extra 50 kilometres added.

“When assessing maternity needs there is always two lives to consider, the mother and the child, and its outrageous that at the time in their lives when they should be close to their families they are not able to be, due to poor decision-making.

“It is not acceptable that pregnant women in rural areas of the South Island are now miles away from anywhere that can support them to have safe births, something a rural impact analysis would have highlighted.

“It’s time the Government and DHB ensured rural communities have the same access to maternity care as urban communities expect,” says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

For more information, please contact National Office.

[email protected]

04 473 5524

 

 

 

 

 

Rural maternity care in crisis

Thursday, August 16, 2018

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit.  Read More

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

New Zealand's farming women celebrating 125 years on

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

 

 

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards will be held on the evening of Tuesday, 20 November 2018 in Wellington in the Banquet Hall at Parliament.

A review of the Enterprising Rural Women Awards has been completed by the RWNZ Board with feedback from members and participants, external advice, and the awards partners.

The awards have been renamed the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards and NZI is the Premier Partner. The categories have been broadened, the application process has been updated and the judging criteria strengthened.

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards give an outstanding opportunity to showcase your business. The event attracts extensive media coverage and promotional opportunities. All winners will receive a membership of Rural Women New Zealand for one year. All category winners will each receive $1000 in prize money and a trophy, and the Supreme Winner will receive a further $1000 in prize money.

 

“Winning the Supreme Award was such an amazing result. I am proud of my achievements and honoured to be surrounded by such inspiring, talented and strong women,”

- Debra Cruickshank of Tannacrieff Wines, Supreme winner 2017.

 

 

You can download the entry forms below, which contain information regarding entry criteria and conditions of entry. The PDF version can be downloaded, printed, filled out and scanned or posted to National Office. The Word.doc available can be electronically filled out using Microsoft Word and sent as an attachment to National Office. Please send entry forms to [email protected].

First stage entry forms (13, June – 1, August) PDF

First stage entry forms (13, June – 1, August) Word.doc


The categories for the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards 2018 are:

  • Emerging business: Awarded to a business starting out in its journey and achieving exceptional results. Open to businesses that have been running from 2 – 5 years.
  • Love of the Land: Harnessing the potential of New Zealand’s land, environment or products of the land, to create a successful business enterprise.
  • Creative Arts: A business specialising in the creative arts working in a rural environment or using rural materials.
  • Innovation: An enterprise that challenges the status quo to bring something new and innovative to the market or utilising rural resources in an innovative way.
  • Rural Champion: A person or business who champions the rural sector or a rural enterprise – an outstanding contributor who goes above and beyond the normal in their support rural enterprise. Open to anybody.
 

A Supreme winner will be chosen from all category finalists, who has shown excellence and outstanding achievement across all entry criteria.

 

Please find following the relevant dates for entries:

  • Wednesday, 13 June - Launch of awards at National Fieldays, entries open
  • Wednesday, 1 August - Entries close, first round judging starts
  • Friday, 31 August - First round judging complete
  • Saturday, 1 September - First stage finalists contacted and second round entries open
  • Sunday, 30 September - Second stage entries close
  • Monday, 1 October - Second stage judging begins.
  • Tuesday, 20 November - NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards (winners announced).

Please read the media release launching the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards here:

If you are interested in supporting the awards as a category partner, please contact [email protected].

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

Wednesday, October 03, 2018

  Read More