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This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World.

It’s a great way to come together, catch up with friends and have some fun and healthy exercise along the way.

The date for the event is Sunday 29 April– ACWW Day - though walks can take place at other dates around that time if more convenient.

Here’s What You Do:

1.Decide on a walk for your group. It can range from a stroll around the park, a hike through the bush, an amble around a neighbourhood or along a walkway.
2.Invite others. This is a great way to reach out to new potential members, and include families and friends.
3.Go to the registration form , fill it in and email [email protected] or post to national office before your walk, so we know what walks are taking place and can promote them.
4.Fund raise through sponsorship, a gold coin donation, or perhaps an afternoon tea or sausage sizzle afterwards.
5.Tally up the number of people who attend and the distance walked.
6.Take photos and send to national office so we can publicise your walks and use on our website and Facebook pages. Email [email protected]
7.Send your funds raised, and details of kilometres walked to national office.

 

 


 

More About The Work Of ACWW

ACWW connects and supports women and communities worldwide by:

• Working in partnership with member societies to offer mutual support
• Connecting at international level through UN representation
• Funding community development projects
• Supporting agricultural initiatives
Find out more about ACWW here.

Women Walk the World 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World. Read More

Wellington-based Radio New Zealand rural journalist, Alexa Cook, has won the inaugural Rural Women New Zealand Rural Connectivity Award at the 2017 awards of the New Zealand Guild of Agricultural Journalists and Communicators.

The Rural Connectivity Award was initiated by Rural Women New Zealand to recognise the importance of connectivity to rural communities and agri-businesses.

 

Alexa also won the supreme award, the Ministry for Primary Industries Rongo Award, for her excellence in agricultural journalism. Her coverage of a week-long muster in Muzzle Station, the first after the Kāikoura earthquake, won her several awards after her articles featured on Morning Report, Checkpoint, Insight programmes, and on the RNZ website.

Congratulations to Sally Rae of the Otago Daily Times who received the Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award for her articles that delivered important messages. The stories about rural women in action in the community were well-written, inspiring and supported by good photography.

At the Beef + Lamb NZ Awards Dinner on Friday 13 October, a total of ten awards were presented, nine for journalism and one for photography.

Other award winners on the night were:

  • The AgResearch Science Writers Award, established to enhance standards of science writing, especially about pastoral agriculture, was won by Alexa Cook and Carol Stiles.
  • The Federated Farmers Broadcast Journalism Award was won jointly by Carol Stiles and Alexa Cook
  • The DairyNZ Dairy Industry Award which recognises the ability to communicate the complexities of the dairy industry, was won by Jackie Harrigan for articles in The Dairy Exporter.
  • The inaugural Zespri Export Journalism Award, which recognises the vital importance of exports to the New Zealand economy, was won by Fairfax Media’s Gerard Hutching.
  • The Alliance Group Ltd Red Meat Industry Journalism Award, which focuses on all aspects of the red meat industry was won by Alexa Cook, of RNZ Rural News
  • The Beef + Lamb New Zealand News Award, which recognises excellence in hard news journalism, focusing on any aspect of the beef and sheep industry, was won by Nigel Stirling for articles in Farmers Weekly and NZX Agri’s Pulse, both on trade talks.
  • The Federated Farmers Rural Photography Award was won by Des Williams, for a photo which appeared in Shearing magazine.
  • The Guild award – the Agricultural Journalism Encouragement Award – is designed to encourage and recognise excellence among journalists with three or less years reporting on agricultural issues. This year, it was won by Brittany Pickett, of Invercargill, for articles which appeared in the NZ Farmer.

For further quotes please contact:
Fiona Gower
National President
Rural Women New Zealand
Email: [email protected]
Mobile: 027 428 3884

 

RWNZ Journalism Award winners 2017

Monday, October 16, 2017

Wellington-based Radio New Zealand rural journalist, Alexa Cook, has won the inaugural Rural Women New Zealand Rural Connectivity Award at the 2017 awards of the New Zealand Guild of Agricultural Journalists and Communicators.  Read More

The Ministry of Health has proposed a new framework for suicide prevention and is seeking feedback. Rural Women New Zealand’s (RWNZ) submission supports the general framework.

Although expresses concern regarding the lack of concrete targets and detailed methods for how any of the initiatives will be implemented. We are especially concerned about the lack of a strategic plan to lead and fund these activities.

The proposed framework aims to address the devastating impact that suicide has on New Zealand’s communities and the unfortunate reality that over 500 people in New Zealand die by suicide every year. RWNZ supports the framework’s focus on supporting positive wellbeing for all ages, increasing awareness of suicidal behaviour and mental health, strengthening systems already in place to support communities, and improving collaboration among those working to prevent suicidal behaviour.

In our submission, we have addressed the fact that the suicide rate is higher in rural areas than in urban areas, as well as the various factors that place rural communities at an increased risk of mental illness. These factors include vulnerability to economic fluctuations and social isolation, which are compounded by the lack of access to services and support, substandard or no access to reliable and affordable internet and mobile coverage, and the history of inequalities that rural communities face often being overlooked.

RWNZ has suggested that in order to improve mental wellbeing in rural areas, rural health research must become a priority to understand and address the needs of rural communities. We have also urged the Ministry of Health to refrain from relying on technological health services, recognising that not all rural communities have access to reliable and affordable internet and mobile coverage.

Rural Women New Zealand strongly supports the framework’s proposal to involve, train and educate community members on suicide prevention. Rural Women New Zealand has expressed that it is essential for rural communities to be provided with the right tools to improve mental wellbeing within the community and reduce social stigma associated with mental illness.

As further information becomes available, this will be distributed to the members.

 

Click here to download the Submission: June 2017 Suicide Prevention Strategy Submission


 

 

Suicide Prevention Strategy Submission

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

The Ministry of Health has proposed a new framework for suicide prevention and is seeking feedback. Rural Women New Zealand’s (RWNZ) submission supports the general framework. Read More

RWNZ recently sent out a survey on Boarding Bursaries, asking members a series of questions, to enable us to provide evidence-based data around the key issues on how the costs of boarding students and the associated issues impact on our rural families.

The information provided formed the report to the Ministry of Education in response to the review on access and the multiple barriers allowances offered by the Ministry of Education’s Boarding Allowance Scheme. 

Eighty survey responses were received, and while each had its own individual comments, there were some common themes.

Question one asked whether or not people believed the value of access barriers and multiple allowance barriers is sufficient. A minority believe the value is sufficient because it is only an assistance, however the majority believe it falls short of the ever-increasing costs of boarding school and fails to take into account certain family circumstances, such as a one parent household, multiple children or a low income household.

As a result of not attending boarding school, children can face disadvantages such as a limited range of extra-curricular activities, or attending a local school which “may not provide a very high standard of education, holding bright children back from achieving their potential.”

Respondents were also asked whether they believed there were families who are eligible to receive allowances but do not apply. Surprisingly, a majority said that they do know of families in this position. Some parents have had issues in the past, and find the process stressful. Other parents have simply not been aware the allowances exist, and it was suggested schools should have an obligation to advise families about allowances. Some stated the opposite, that in their communities almost everyone applies because the majority are low to middle income earners, and need all financial assistance available.

When asked whether they believed the eligibility criteria are set at the right level, most people disagreed. Those who disagreed believe the distance criteria are too high, and fail to take into account rural areas with rough terrain and narrow windy roads. It can be difficult for families living in isolated areas traveling on gravel roads that are slower to negotiate. However, those who agreed also mentioned there probably needs to be some flexibility for unique cases.

There are many consequences for families who cannot board due to financial reasons. For the child, common consequences include isolation, lack of social contact, lack of friendships and the ability to build new relationships, and a lack of participation in cultural, sporting and other activities. The effect on the whole family includes the cost and stress of relocating, and in some cases dividing the family.

From the survey, the proposed solution is that all children should be given the option to go to boarding school if they wish. They should also have the ability to return back home after their studies as a fulfilled citizen, passionate and influential, with a desire to give back to the community they originated from. The access barriers facing families today that wish to send a child to boarding school are perceived to be a lot harder than in previous years.

Great Barrier Island

There were a large number of responses from Great Barrier Island where the issue of boarding allowances is a “hot topic”, and because they are a small and close-knit community, families regularly engage in open and frank discussions. While correspondence is an option, there were many issues, and are still, with the Correspondence School: Te Kura. Also, correspondence does not fit with every child’s learning needs.

These children take correspondence due to lack of money, and it is felt on the island that they are not receiving a proper education. To make matters worse, this increases their chance of gravitating towards and becoming involved in social activities with negative outcomes.

Great Barrier Island believe that the allowances should also be area-based, and not subject to distance criteria.

 

 

 

Boarding Allowance Scheme Survey

Monday, June 19, 2017

RWNZ recently sent out a survey on Boarding Bursaries, asking members a series of questions, to enable us to provide evidence-based data around the key issues on how the costs of boarding students and the associated issues impact on our rural families. Read More

Budget 2017 had several areas of interest for rural, in particular for the farming sector, where there is additional funding for the Ministry of Primary Industries on biosecurity, irrigation, and trade facilitation.

The Budget’s focus on spending on public services, social investment, and infrastructure will also benefit rural people. Changes to tax brackets, Working for Families and Accommodation Supplements targeted at lower and middle income families is also important.

A $4.0 billion infrastructure package includes $812 million capital investment to reinstate the earthquake damaged sections of State Highway 1 from Picton to Christchurch. $548 million is also being invested in the rail network.

Roading infrastructure spending has been given a boost with items such as the Huntly and Hamilton sections of the Waikato Expressway; the Whirokino trestle bridge replacement in Manawatu-Whanganui; the Mt Messenger-Awakino Gorge corridor in Taranaki; and the Motu Bridge replacement in Gisborne.

Tourism infrastructure will receive $44.6 million in operations funding and $41 million in capital to ease pressure on Department of Conservation land and facilities, with an additional $9.7 million capital allocation beyond the four-year period.

Primary industries benefit from an increase of $30.5 million of operating funding to upgrade and modernise the fisheries management system. Setting aside $100 million of under-utilised Crown land to build houses, means less horticultural land is likely to be used for housing.

An additional $59.2 million over four years has been set aside to ensure all road ambulance call outs are double crewed by 2021, by creating 375 new emergency medical and paramedic roles across the country. This will directly benefit a number of rural districts in New Zealand.

Budget 2017 also allocated additional grant funding of $26.7 million over the next three years, plus a capital boost of $63 million towards irrigation projects.

Click here to download RWNZ's full Budget 2017 report written by Craig Matthews, freelance writer and editor.

Budget 2017

Friday, May 26, 2017

Budget 2017 had several areas of interest for rural, in particular for the farming sector, where there is additional funding for the Ministry of Primary Industries on biosecurity, irrigation, and trade facilitation. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) remind drivers that school buses are back on the roads, remember the 20km/h speed limit when passing a stopped school bus.

“It is very important in all communities, particularly in rural areas, that drivers are aware of the rule and safe speed limit of 20km/h passing a stopped school bus,” says Fiona Gower, National President of RWNZ.

Additionally, the organisation NZ School Speeds is encouraging government to consider lowering speed limits to a maximum of 30km/h in school zones at peak times, to bring these in line with the 20km/h School Bus rule. "It is hoped that all political parties will agree to a speed restriction outside schools at peak times," says Lucinda Rees of NZ School Speeds.

RWNZ also advocate for parents and caregivers to teach children about road safety when they are getting on and off the bus, at the gate or at the designated point on the road. Accompany children to the bus stop and ensure that they understand what to do. When picking up children, park on the same side of the road as the bus stop. Let friends and neighbours know that the buses are back on the roads and to watch out for children.


 

Safety around school zones and school buses

Friday, January 27, 2017

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) remind drivers that school buses are back on the roads, remember the 20km/h speed limit when passing a stopped school bus. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has issued a submission to the Government expressing concerns about the impact of the Education (Update) Amendment Bill for rural schools.

The Bill proposes some significant changes to the Act, including allowing for the accreditation of private online charter schools. Under this proposal children as young as five years old will have the ability to elect to receive some or all of their education online. “The risk of online charter schools diverting both students and much needed government funding away from rural schools is something we are concerned about.” says former National President, Wendy McGowan. “Rural schools perform a vital role in their communities, yet many are struggling to cope with the unique challenges of providing education in isolated areas. The Government’s first priority should be in further supporting these schools, rather than seeking out alternative providers, which could challenge their viability” says Wendy McGowan.

In its submission RWNZ says that it doesn’t think that online schools are an acceptable substitute to traditional schools. “In general, we think most children benefit from being able to learn within a traditional school setting where they have the opportunity to socialize and interact with their peers. This is particularly true in rural communities where isolation is a major concern” says Wendy McGowan. “A further limiting factor of online schools is their reliance on a decent level of internet connectivity, something that is lacking in many remote parts of the country” says Wendy McGowan. RWNZ’s submission also outlines concerns that taking children out of the school environment could increase their vulnerability to abuse, neglect in the home and missing out on important primary health interventions, like vaccinations. Research from the United States showing that the academic performance of students at online charter schools is lagging behind those in traditional schools is also referenced in its submission.

RWNZ’S submission also addresses the Bill’s proposal to shift Career Services into the Tertiary Education Commission. “We support the Government in wanting to improve career services to students, but we’re not sure how creating another unit within government will achieve this”, says Wendy McGowan. Changes which RWNZ do support include the introduction of a Statement of National Education and Learning Priorities and changes in the Bill to clarify government expectations around boards of trustees. “These changes will hopefully provide more certainty for schools, as well as consistency for students,” says Wendy McGowan.

Click here to download the submission


Submission on the Education (Update) Amendment Bill

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has issued a submission to the Government expressing concerns about the impact of the Education (Update) Amendment Bill for rural schools. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has issued a submission expressing its support for the Government’s Land Transport Amendment Bill whilst also expressing concern about the recent spike in New Zealand’s road toll and current levels of policing.

“On the whole the changes in the bill are directed towards improving road safety and we support them on that basis” says National President, Wendy McGowan.The Bill sets harsher penalties for offenders who flee the police and also makes it mandatory for high-alcohol offenders and repeat-drink and drivers to have breath testing alcohol devices installed in their cars. “However, we also note recent spikes in the road toll over the last three years, which we think do raise questions about the adequacy of current policing levels”. According to figures from the Ministry of Transport, the road toll in 2015 involved the highest number of fatalities on New Zealand’s roads since 2010. “We think the question of whether current policing levels are appropriate for road safety purposes should be examined as part of this Bill. The changes introduced in this Bill will only be effective with the right level of police enforcement ” says Wendy McGowan.

In its submission, RWNZ also recommend that the Committee further examine the competition effects of new changes the Bill introduces to “small passenger services”. These changes will require the likes of Uber to be subject to the same licensing regime as taxi drivers, with the intention of creating a more level playing field. However, according to RWNZ’s submission the playing field in rural areas is already heavily skewed towards taxi drivers, which have a significant competitive hold on the market and the ability to charge extortionate prices. The lack of affordable taxi services in rural areas is a strong contributor to isolation in rural areas, particularly for vulnerable population groups like the elderly. “We want to make sure that these changes will encourage competition in the market, rather than imposing additional compliance costs on potential new players” says Wendy McGowan.

Click here to download the submission

Media Release Land Transport Amendment Bill

Monday, November 07, 2016

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has issued a submission expressing its support for the Government’s Land Transport Amendment Bill whilst also expressing concern about the recent spike in New Zealand’s road toll and current levels of policing. Read More

After two weeks of having children at home for the term break, it is time for them to head back to school for the final term of the year. Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) remind drivers that school buses are back on the roads and that sometimes unpredictable things happen around school buses when they are stopped.

“It is very important in all communities, particularly in rural areas, that drivers adhere to the rule and slow down to 20km/h passing a stopped school bus, no matter which side of the road you are driving on,” says Wendy McGowan, National President of RWNZ.

“The roads in our rural communities are not always quiet roads and we need to be responsible for playing our part to make the roads safer for everyone who uses the roads, especially our children.”

RWNZ also advocate for parents and caregivers to teach children about road safety when they are getting on and off the bus at the gate or at the designated point on the road. Accompany children to the bus stop and ensure that they understand what to do. Let friends and neighbours know that the buses are back on the roads and to watch out for children.

Back to school, look out for school children

Friday, October 07, 2016

After two weeks of having children at home for the term break, it is time for them to head back to school for the final term of the year. Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) remind drivers that school buses are back on the roads and that sometimes unpredictable things happen around school buses when they are stopped. Read More

The awards have been refreshed for this year to encourage a range of applications from emerging business or community leaders, successful entrepreneurs and innovators in technology. There will be four prizes in total, including a Supreme Award. We encourage applications from a range of enterprising rural women and even past winners who have moved to a higher level with their business or service to the rural community.

Award Name Award Category
1.Emerging Enterprising Rural Woman Award Inspiring leader in rural business or a community influencer.
2.Innovative Enterprising Rural Woman Award Use of new technology, and adapting to rural location.
3.Entrepreneurial Enterprising Rural Woman Award Business success in horticulture, agricultural, dairy, tourism or other rural sector. Demonstrates commercial viability from rural enterprise.
4.Supreme Award: Enterprising Rural Woman Achievement Award Selected from the three category winners (Must have significant achievement or success in rural community/business/technology/social influence).

Thank you to our partners for the Awards

    


 

Six rural businesses are competing to win one of three categories this year and the supreme award. Each category winner receives $1,000 in prize money and a trophy, with a further $1,000 being awarded to the supreme winner who is judged as an outstanding rural businesswomen.

Barbara Faulls: Smiths Farm Holiday Camp, Picton
Smiths Farm in proud to offer a quality holiday with space, peace and the clean country air and has been rated as 4+STAR and Enviro Silver by Qualmark. Situated on a working beef farm, the park is a base from which to relax, explore the Marlborough Sounds.

Bernadette Jackson: LaValla Estate, Tuakau
A function and event centre with accommodation and a theatre. The venue recently hosted the Fieldays Bachelor Breakfast with Rural Women New Zealand. The key deliverables for the venue are rest, feast, play and focus.

Marian Hirst: Bay Blueberries, Hastings
Passionate about producing quality apples and blueberries in an environmentally friendly and sustainable manner. Recipient of the 2016 Balance Farm Environmental Supreme Award for the East Coast Region.

Monique Neeson and Lyn Neeson: Shear Warmth, Taumarunui
Shear Warmth produce top quality wool blankets, made in New Zealand and can be traced back to wool grown on the family farm. The sheep and beef farm Awarima recently featured on Country Calendar.

Helen Slattery: Slattery Contracting Limited, Matamata
The Slattery Family has been involved in Ag Contracting since the mid 1950’s, starting hay making and cultivating land. The business has grown from harvesting conventional hay bales, ploughing and undersowing to a wide range of services.

Amy Dibley: Physio Direct, Rotorua
Amy started Physio Direct when she realised that many small rural areas do not have adequate physiotherapy services. Amy grew up on a dairy farm in Ngongotaha on the outskirts of Rotorua. She understands the physical demands of a rural life and believes everyone should have the right to health services which is why she offers physiotherapy to small communities.

The winners will be announced at the Enterprising Rural Women Awards ceremony on Saturday 12 November in Wellington. 

 

 

 

 

Enterprising Rural Women Awards 2016

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

 Read More

Read All NewsRecent news

Congratulations to the National Competition Winners for 2017

Tarrant Bell & Tutaenui Bell Speech contest topic: “Why Not?”

Tutaenui Bell and Tarrant Bell

1st Place Alex Thompson, Amuri Dinner Branch, Region 2

2nd Place Leona Trimble, Hampden Branch, Region 1


Marlborough Short Story & Olive Burdekin short story “ What a Fuss”

1000-1500 words for Marlborough Short Story – Kerry France, Moa Flat Branch, Region 1 for “Guess what I am.” Dominion Essay Tray and voucher from Region 3

 

1500- 2000 words for Olive Burdekin – Chrissy Sumby, Kenepuru Branch, Region 3 for “Bay Swimming” Voucher from Region 3

 

Cora Wilding- insulated Pot Stand - any medium

Melva Robb – Marlborough Provincial, 1st Place, Region 3


Olive Craig Trophy Member of Excellence (Judged by the National Board) Sue Hall Region 6


Talbot Trophy- best Provincial, Branch or Group International Officer report

International Officer - Melva Robb – Marlborough Provincial, 1st Place, Region 3

 

The Honora O’Neill Gong is for the best Provincial, Sandra Curd, Mid Canterbury Region 2

 

Branch or Group President’s Report: Carolyn McLellan, Bainham Branch Region 3

The Lady Blundell Tray Competition

for the most innovative project completed by an individual, Group, Branch, Provincial or Region.

Winner: Amuri Dinner Group.


 

National Competition Winners 2017

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Congratulations to the National Competition Winners for 2017 Read More

Rural untracked parcels change

 

From 1 February, New Zealand Post customers will see the cost of sending untracked parcels to rural addresses increase by $3.70.

This charge, which was initially only placed on Tracked, Courier and Courier Signature parcels will now also be applied to untracked parcels sent to a rural address as a means to offset fixed costs associated with deliver to rural locations.

New Zealand Post has stated that these costs are a result of the continuing decrease in letter volumes.

 

Despite ongoing cost reductions made, this change is said to be necessary to continue to operate a sustainable network.

For business account customers, the change will take effect on 1 July 2018 as set out in their contacts.

 

 

Rural Post Prices to Change

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Rural untracked parcels change
 Read More

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events.

The Rural Support Trust advise farmers to ensure stock and domestic animals have food, water, and shelter where necessary, and are secure. Ensure that all stock injuries are promptly attended too, after human needs are met.

If your farm or rural property or stock has been affected by an adverse event and you need assistance, contact your local Rural Support Trust on 0800 787 254 (0800 RURAL HELP) with information on the impacts on your farm, or requests for help.

The Rural Women New Zealand Adverse Events and Relief Fund is available to individuals, communities and groups, with a particular emphasis on rural women and children. The fund provides financial assistance to persons or groups, where there is an identified urgent need due to recent adverse events such as drought, fires, floods or earthquakes.

Click here to read more about applying for the fund.

Contact details for support agencies:

The Rural Support Trust (RST organise community events and one-on-one mentoring, as well as targeted support services in emergency situations)  
http://www.rural-support.org.nz Ph: 0800 787 254.

DairyNZ: Sharemilkers support http://www.dairynz.co.nz/farm/tactics/support-for-sharemilkers/

Federated Farmers http://www.fedfarm.org.nz/ Ph: 0800 327 646 or drought feedline 0800 376 844.

Doug Avery’s Resilient Farmer http://www.resilientfarmer.co.nz/

Farmstrong http://www.farmstrong.co.nz


If you just want to talk, or know someone who is at risk, there are a range of support options available, including counselling services:

Lifeline: 0800 543 354 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling

Youthline: 0800 376 633 or free text 234 - Provides 24 hour telephone and text counselling services for young people

Samaritans: 0800 726 666 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling.

Women's Refuge: 0800 REFUGE (733 843) a 24/7 crisis and support line provide advice and information.

Shakti New Zealand 0800SHAKTI (0800 742 584) If you are in a situation of domestic violence call our 24-hour crisis line, and multi-lingual staff will provide information.

Tautoko: 0508 828 865 - provides support, information and resources to people at risk of suicide, and their family, whānau and friends.

What'sup: 0800 942 8787 (0800 What’s Up) is a counselling helpline for children and young people, aged 5-18. Phone Mon-Fri 1-10pm, Sat-Sun 3-10pm.

Kidsline: 0800 543 754, it is a 24/7 helpline for children and teens, run by specially trained youth volunteers.

Thelowdown.co.nz - Free Text 5626, watch videos or contact for support. 

depression.org.nz National Depression Initiative (for adults), 0800 111 757 - 24 hour service 

Ministry for Children Oranga Tamariki If you're worried about a child or family that you know, there are ways you can help, contact Child, Youth and Family.

For information about suicide prevention, see http://www.spinz.org.nz .

If it is an emergency, or you feel yourself, or someone you know is at risk, please call 111.

Rural community support services

Thursday, April 06, 2017

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events. Read More

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World.

It’s a great way to come together, catch up with friends and have some fun and healthy exercise along the way.

The date for the event is Sunday 29 April– ACWW Day - though walks can take place at other dates around that time if more convenient.

Here’s What You Do:

1.Decide on a walk for your group. It can range from a stroll around the park, a hike through the bush, an amble around a neighbourhood or along a walkway.
2.Invite others. This is a great way to reach out to new potential members, and include families and friends.
3.Go to the registration form , fill it in and email [email protected] or post to national office before your walk, so we know what walks are taking place and can promote them.
4.Fund raise through sponsorship, a gold coin donation, or perhaps an afternoon tea or sausage sizzle afterwards.
5.Tally up the number of people who attend and the distance walked.
6.Take photos and send to national office so we can publicise your walks and use on our website and Facebook pages. Email [email protected]
7.Send your funds raised, and details of kilometres walked to national office.

 

 


 

More About The Work Of ACWW

ACWW connects and supports women and communities worldwide by:

• Working in partnership with member societies to offer mutual support
• Connecting at international level through UN representation
• Funding community development projects
• Supporting agricultural initiatives
Find out more about ACWW here.

Women Walk the World 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World. Read More

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.

RWNZ was one of the founding members of ACWW. It is one of the largest international development organisations for rural women.

The ACWW network allows it to engage at the local, national, and international level with the aim of achieving these goals:

- To raise the standard of living for rural women and their families through education, training and community development programmes.

- To provide practical support to our members and help them set up income-generating schemes.

- To support educational opportunities for women and girls, and help eliminate gender discrimination.

- To give rural women a voice at an international level through our links with UN agencies and bodies.

Caption: Delegates from the South Pacific Area Conference in New Plymouth complete the ACWW Walk the World event in April 2017. 

Click here to download an information booklet about ACWW (8MB PDF)

Click here to go to the ACWW website

 

ACWW Study Topic 2017

Friday, June 16, 2017

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.  Read More

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents.

Mr Leggett says the honours are an opportunity to recognise members of the community who give outstanding service to others.

“The recipients use their skills and energy and give their time and talents to a myriad of organisations and causes. They are serving us all by contributing to the greater good and each deserves our grateful thanks,” he said.

Severe earthquakes hit on 14 November 2016 affecting rural people in North Canterbury, Kaikōura and South Marlborough. Melva and Glenda spearheaded delivery of relief supplies to remote rural families.They teamed up with the local Rural Support Trust and Federated Farmers, to contact as many residents as they could to assess what was needed other than food.

“Melva and Glenda’s personal compassion which comes with a loving dollop of practical help, alleviated the sense of isolation and trauma families were experiencing from the Clarence to South Marlborough and the Awatere Valley,” says RWNZ Marlborough member Barbara Stuart. “They took the crisis seriously and did everything in their power to help.”

Glenda and Melva appealed to RWNZ members and the wider community for donations of crockery and dinner sets. They prepared 100 gift baskets of baking, chocolates and soft toys for children and managed to get supplies onto transport that was headed to isolated areas. They even sent a gift basket via helicopter for a family with a new-born baby, who were isolated at the top of the Awatere Valley.

 

The other honours recipients this year are Ross Beech, a farmer-environmentalist and a member of the South Marlborough Landscape Restoration Trust; Jim Thomas, a Lions Club member with a record of service to sport and who has a key role in the local Victim Support service, and Henny Vervaart, a Rotary Club member, Red Cross meals-on-wheels volunteer and a valued part of the Alzheimers Marlborough organisation.

Ends


 

 

Civic Award for Melva Robb and Glenda Robb

Monday, October 09, 2017

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents. Read More