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RECENT NEWS

Rural Women New Zealand have released a media release raising our concerns for how data is being collected in this year's census.

Please read the media release below.

CENSUS DATA COLLECTION INTEGRITY QUESTIONED

This year’s census is in danger of not providing the data needed to make good decisions, says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“Whilst we understand and support the excitement of capturing our census data online, our concern is that many people still do not have access to internet while others might not have the capability or capacity to do so,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“The timing of the delivery of access code letters, which indicate that New Zealanders can opt for paper forms presents challenges for our rural communities, given that delivery of mail is taking longer and might only be delivered three days a week.

“The chances of a rural household without internet or with unreliable internet, receiving census paper forms in time for Tuesday, 6 March is slim, and that is concerning.

“RWNZ is doing everything possible to ensure our networks are aware of the new way of doing the Census although surely more thought should have gone in to how the valuable information about the lives and status of New Zealanders would be collected.

“Maybe this year, there could have been a concerted effort to use both electronic collection and paper collection to ensure integrity of the data,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

 

Please contact the National Office for more information.

 

 

National Office

Rural Women New Zealand

 

[email protected]

04 473 5524


 

 

(image source: www.census.govt.nz)

Census Data Collection Integrity Questioned

Monday, February 26, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand have released a media release raising our concerns for how data is being collected in this year's census.  Read More

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World.

It’s a great way to come together, catch up with friends and have some fun and healthy exercise along the way.

The date for the event is Sunday 29 April– ACWW Day - though walks can take place at other dates around that time if more convenient.

Here’s What You Do:

1.Decide on a walk for your group. It can range from a stroll around the park, a hike through the bush, an amble around a neighbourhood or along a walkway.
2.Invite others. This is a great way to reach out to new potential members, and include families and friends.
3.Go to the registration form , fill it in and email [email protected] or post to national office before your walk, so we know what walks are taking place and can promote them.
4.Fund raise through sponsorship, a gold coin donation, or perhaps an afternoon tea or sausage sizzle afterwards.
5.Tally up the number of people who attend and the distance walked.
6.Take photos and send to national office so we can publicise your walks and use on our website and Facebook pages. Email [email protected]
7.Send your funds raised, and details of kilometres walked to national office.

 

 


 

More About The Work Of ACWW

ACWW connects and supports women and communities worldwide by:

• Working in partnership with member societies to offer mutual support
• Connecting at international level through UN representation
• Funding community development projects
• Supporting agricultural initiatives
Find out more about ACWW here.

Women Walk the World 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World. Read More

Wellington-based Radio New Zealand rural journalist, Alexa Cook, has won the inaugural Rural Women New Zealand Rural Connectivity Award at the 2017 awards of the New Zealand Guild of Agricultural Journalists and Communicators.

The Rural Connectivity Award was initiated by Rural Women New Zealand to recognise the importance of connectivity to rural communities and agri-businesses.

 

Alexa also won the supreme award, the Ministry for Primary Industries Rongo Award, for her excellence in agricultural journalism. Her coverage of a week-long muster in Muzzle Station, the first after the Kāikoura earthquake, won her several awards after her articles featured on Morning Report, Checkpoint, Insight programmes, and on the RNZ website.

Congratulations to Sally Rae of the Otago Daily Times who received the Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award for her articles that delivered important messages. The stories about rural women in action in the community were well-written, inspiring and supported by good photography.

At the Beef + Lamb NZ Awards Dinner on Friday 13 October, a total of ten awards were presented, nine for journalism and one for photography.

Other award winners on the night were:

  • The AgResearch Science Writers Award, established to enhance standards of science writing, especially about pastoral agriculture, was won by Alexa Cook and Carol Stiles.
  • The Federated Farmers Broadcast Journalism Award was won jointly by Carol Stiles and Alexa Cook
  • The DairyNZ Dairy Industry Award which recognises the ability to communicate the complexities of the dairy industry, was won by Jackie Harrigan for articles in The Dairy Exporter.
  • The inaugural Zespri Export Journalism Award, which recognises the vital importance of exports to the New Zealand economy, was won by Fairfax Media’s Gerard Hutching.
  • The Alliance Group Ltd Red Meat Industry Journalism Award, which focuses on all aspects of the red meat industry was won by Alexa Cook, of RNZ Rural News
  • The Beef + Lamb New Zealand News Award, which recognises excellence in hard news journalism, focusing on any aspect of the beef and sheep industry, was won by Nigel Stirling for articles in Farmers Weekly and NZX Agri’s Pulse, both on trade talks.
  • The Federated Farmers Rural Photography Award was won by Des Williams, for a photo which appeared in Shearing magazine.
  • The Guild award – the Agricultural Journalism Encouragement Award – is designed to encourage and recognise excellence among journalists with three or less years reporting on agricultural issues. This year, it was won by Brittany Pickett, of Invercargill, for articles which appeared in the NZ Farmer.

For further quotes please contact:
Fiona Gower
National President
Rural Women New Zealand
Email: [email protected]
Mobile: 027 428 3884

 

RWNZ Journalism Award winners 2017

Monday, October 16, 2017

Wellington-based Radio New Zealand rural journalist, Alexa Cook, has won the inaugural Rural Women New Zealand Rural Connectivity Award at the 2017 awards of the New Zealand Guild of Agricultural Journalists and Communicators.  Read More

The Ministry of Health has proposed a new framework for suicide prevention and is seeking feedback. Rural Women New Zealand’s (RWNZ) submission supports the general framework.

Although expresses concern regarding the lack of concrete targets and detailed methods for how any of the initiatives will be implemented. We are especially concerned about the lack of a strategic plan to lead and fund these activities.

The proposed framework aims to address the devastating impact that suicide has on New Zealand’s communities and the unfortunate reality that over 500 people in New Zealand die by suicide every year. RWNZ supports the framework’s focus on supporting positive wellbeing for all ages, increasing awareness of suicidal behaviour and mental health, strengthening systems already in place to support communities, and improving collaboration among those working to prevent suicidal behaviour.

In our submission, we have addressed the fact that the suicide rate is higher in rural areas than in urban areas, as well as the various factors that place rural communities at an increased risk of mental illness. These factors include vulnerability to economic fluctuations and social isolation, which are compounded by the lack of access to services and support, substandard or no access to reliable and affordable internet and mobile coverage, and the history of inequalities that rural communities face often being overlooked.

RWNZ has suggested that in order to improve mental wellbeing in rural areas, rural health research must become a priority to understand and address the needs of rural communities. We have also urged the Ministry of Health to refrain from relying on technological health services, recognising that not all rural communities have access to reliable and affordable internet and mobile coverage.

Rural Women New Zealand strongly supports the framework’s proposal to involve, train and educate community members on suicide prevention. Rural Women New Zealand has expressed that it is essential for rural communities to be provided with the right tools to improve mental wellbeing within the community and reduce social stigma associated with mental illness.

As further information becomes available, this will be distributed to the members.

 

Click here to download the Submission: June 2017 Suicide Prevention Strategy Submission


 

 

Suicide Prevention Strategy Submission

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

The Ministry of Health has proposed a new framework for suicide prevention and is seeking feedback. Rural Women New Zealand’s (RWNZ) submission supports the general framework. Read More

RWNZ recently sent out a survey on Boarding Bursaries, asking members a series of questions, to enable us to provide evidence-based data around the key issues on how the costs of boarding students and the associated issues impact on our rural families.

The information provided formed the report to the Ministry of Education in response to the review on access and the multiple barriers allowances offered by the Ministry of Education’s Boarding Allowance Scheme. 

Eighty survey responses were received, and while each had its own individual comments, there were some common themes.

Question one asked whether or not people believed the value of access barriers and multiple allowance barriers is sufficient. A minority believe the value is sufficient because it is only an assistance, however the majority believe it falls short of the ever-increasing costs of boarding school and fails to take into account certain family circumstances, such as a one parent household, multiple children or a low income household.

As a result of not attending boarding school, children can face disadvantages such as a limited range of extra-curricular activities, or attending a local school which “may not provide a very high standard of education, holding bright children back from achieving their potential.”

Respondents were also asked whether they believed there were families who are eligible to receive allowances but do not apply. Surprisingly, a majority said that they do know of families in this position. Some parents have had issues in the past, and find the process stressful. Other parents have simply not been aware the allowances exist, and it was suggested schools should have an obligation to advise families about allowances. Some stated the opposite, that in their communities almost everyone applies because the majority are low to middle income earners, and need all financial assistance available.

When asked whether they believed the eligibility criteria are set at the right level, most people disagreed. Those who disagreed believe the distance criteria are too high, and fail to take into account rural areas with rough terrain and narrow windy roads. It can be difficult for families living in isolated areas traveling on gravel roads that are slower to negotiate. However, those who agreed also mentioned there probably needs to be some flexibility for unique cases.

There are many consequences for families who cannot board due to financial reasons. For the child, common consequences include isolation, lack of social contact, lack of friendships and the ability to build new relationships, and a lack of participation in cultural, sporting and other activities. The effect on the whole family includes the cost and stress of relocating, and in some cases dividing the family.

From the survey, the proposed solution is that all children should be given the option to go to boarding school if they wish. They should also have the ability to return back home after their studies as a fulfilled citizen, passionate and influential, with a desire to give back to the community they originated from. The access barriers facing families today that wish to send a child to boarding school are perceived to be a lot harder than in previous years.

Great Barrier Island

There were a large number of responses from Great Barrier Island where the issue of boarding allowances is a “hot topic”, and because they are a small and close-knit community, families regularly engage in open and frank discussions. While correspondence is an option, there were many issues, and are still, with the Correspondence School: Te Kura. Also, correspondence does not fit with every child’s learning needs.

These children take correspondence due to lack of money, and it is felt on the island that they are not receiving a proper education. To make matters worse, this increases their chance of gravitating towards and becoming involved in social activities with negative outcomes.

Great Barrier Island believe that the allowances should also be area-based, and not subject to distance criteria.

 

 

 

Boarding Allowance Scheme Survey

Monday, June 19, 2017

RWNZ recently sent out a survey on Boarding Bursaries, asking members a series of questions, to enable us to provide evidence-based data around the key issues on how the costs of boarding students and the associated issues impact on our rural families. Read More

Budget 2017 had several areas of interest for rural, in particular for the farming sector, where there is additional funding for the Ministry of Primary Industries on biosecurity, irrigation, and trade facilitation.

The Budget’s focus on spending on public services, social investment, and infrastructure will also benefit rural people. Changes to tax brackets, Working for Families and Accommodation Supplements targeted at lower and middle income families is also important.

A $4.0 billion infrastructure package includes $812 million capital investment to reinstate the earthquake damaged sections of State Highway 1 from Picton to Christchurch. $548 million is also being invested in the rail network.

Roading infrastructure spending has been given a boost with items such as the Huntly and Hamilton sections of the Waikato Expressway; the Whirokino trestle bridge replacement in Manawatu-Whanganui; the Mt Messenger-Awakino Gorge corridor in Taranaki; and the Motu Bridge replacement in Gisborne.

Tourism infrastructure will receive $44.6 million in operations funding and $41 million in capital to ease pressure on Department of Conservation land and facilities, with an additional $9.7 million capital allocation beyond the four-year period.

Primary industries benefit from an increase of $30.5 million of operating funding to upgrade and modernise the fisheries management system. Setting aside $100 million of under-utilised Crown land to build houses, means less horticultural land is likely to be used for housing.

An additional $59.2 million over four years has been set aside to ensure all road ambulance call outs are double crewed by 2021, by creating 375 new emergency medical and paramedic roles across the country. This will directly benefit a number of rural districts in New Zealand.

Budget 2017 also allocated additional grant funding of $26.7 million over the next three years, plus a capital boost of $63 million towards irrigation projects.

Click here to download RWNZ's full Budget 2017 report written by Craig Matthews, freelance writer and editor.

Budget 2017

Friday, May 26, 2017

Budget 2017 had several areas of interest for rural, in particular for the farming sector, where there is additional funding for the Ministry of Primary Industries on biosecurity, irrigation, and trade facilitation. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) remind drivers that school buses are back on the roads, remember the 20km/h speed limit when passing a stopped school bus.

“It is very important in all communities, particularly in rural areas, that drivers are aware of the rule and safe speed limit of 20km/h passing a stopped school bus,” says Fiona Gower, National President of RWNZ.

Additionally, the organisation NZ School Speeds is encouraging government to consider lowering speed limits to a maximum of 30km/h in school zones at peak times, to bring these in line with the 20km/h School Bus rule. "It is hoped that all political parties will agree to a speed restriction outside schools at peak times," says Lucinda Rees of NZ School Speeds.

RWNZ also advocate for parents and caregivers to teach children about road safety when they are getting on and off the bus, at the gate or at the designated point on the road. Accompany children to the bus stop and ensure that they understand what to do. When picking up children, park on the same side of the road as the bus stop. Let friends and neighbours know that the buses are back on the roads and to watch out for children.


 

Safety around school zones and school buses

Friday, January 27, 2017

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) remind drivers that school buses are back on the roads, remember the 20km/h speed limit when passing a stopped school bus. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has issued a submission to the Government expressing concerns about the impact of the Education (Update) Amendment Bill for rural schools.

The Bill proposes some significant changes to the Act, including allowing for the accreditation of private online charter schools. Under this proposal children as young as five years old will have the ability to elect to receive some or all of their education online. “The risk of online charter schools diverting both students and much needed government funding away from rural schools is something we are concerned about.” says former National President, Wendy McGowan. “Rural schools perform a vital role in their communities, yet many are struggling to cope with the unique challenges of providing education in isolated areas. The Government’s first priority should be in further supporting these schools, rather than seeking out alternative providers, which could challenge their viability” says Wendy McGowan.

In its submission RWNZ says that it doesn’t think that online schools are an acceptable substitute to traditional schools. “In general, we think most children benefit from being able to learn within a traditional school setting where they have the opportunity to socialize and interact with their peers. This is particularly true in rural communities where isolation is a major concern” says Wendy McGowan. “A further limiting factor of online schools is their reliance on a decent level of internet connectivity, something that is lacking in many remote parts of the country” says Wendy McGowan. RWNZ’s submission also outlines concerns that taking children out of the school environment could increase their vulnerability to abuse, neglect in the home and missing out on important primary health interventions, like vaccinations. Research from the United States showing that the academic performance of students at online charter schools is lagging behind those in traditional schools is also referenced in its submission.

RWNZ’S submission also addresses the Bill’s proposal to shift Career Services into the Tertiary Education Commission. “We support the Government in wanting to improve career services to students, but we’re not sure how creating another unit within government will achieve this”, says Wendy McGowan. Changes which RWNZ do support include the introduction of a Statement of National Education and Learning Priorities and changes in the Bill to clarify government expectations around boards of trustees. “These changes will hopefully provide more certainty for schools, as well as consistency for students,” says Wendy McGowan.

Click here to download the submission


Submission on the Education (Update) Amendment Bill

Thursday, November 24, 2016

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has issued a submission to the Government expressing concerns about the impact of the Education (Update) Amendment Bill for rural schools. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has issued a submission expressing its support for the Government’s Land Transport Amendment Bill whilst also expressing concern about the recent spike in New Zealand’s road toll and current levels of policing.

“On the whole the changes in the bill are directed towards improving road safety and we support them on that basis” says National President, Wendy McGowan.The Bill sets harsher penalties for offenders who flee the police and also makes it mandatory for high-alcohol offenders and repeat-drink and drivers to have breath testing alcohol devices installed in their cars. “However, we also note recent spikes in the road toll over the last three years, which we think do raise questions about the adequacy of current policing levels”. According to figures from the Ministry of Transport, the road toll in 2015 involved the highest number of fatalities on New Zealand’s roads since 2010. “We think the question of whether current policing levels are appropriate for road safety purposes should be examined as part of this Bill. The changes introduced in this Bill will only be effective with the right level of police enforcement ” says Wendy McGowan.

In its submission, RWNZ also recommend that the Committee further examine the competition effects of new changes the Bill introduces to “small passenger services”. These changes will require the likes of Uber to be subject to the same licensing regime as taxi drivers, with the intention of creating a more level playing field. However, according to RWNZ’s submission the playing field in rural areas is already heavily skewed towards taxi drivers, which have a significant competitive hold on the market and the ability to charge extortionate prices. The lack of affordable taxi services in rural areas is a strong contributor to isolation in rural areas, particularly for vulnerable population groups like the elderly. “We want to make sure that these changes will encourage competition in the market, rather than imposing additional compliance costs on potential new players” says Wendy McGowan.

Click here to download the submission

Media Release Land Transport Amendment Bill

Monday, November 07, 2016

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has issued a submission expressing its support for the Government’s Land Transport Amendment Bill whilst also expressing concern about the recent spike in New Zealand’s road toll and current levels of policing. Read More

After two weeks of having children at home for the term break, it is time for them to head back to school for the final term of the year. Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) remind drivers that school buses are back on the roads and that sometimes unpredictable things happen around school buses when they are stopped.

“It is very important in all communities, particularly in rural areas, that drivers adhere to the rule and slow down to 20km/h passing a stopped school bus, no matter which side of the road you are driving on,” says Wendy McGowan, National President of RWNZ.

“The roads in our rural communities are not always quiet roads and we need to be responsible for playing our part to make the roads safer for everyone who uses the roads, especially our children.”

RWNZ also advocate for parents and caregivers to teach children about road safety when they are getting on and off the bus at the gate or at the designated point on the road. Accompany children to the bus stop and ensure that they understand what to do. Let friends and neighbours know that the buses are back on the roads and to watch out for children.

Back to school, look out for school children

Friday, October 07, 2016

After two weeks of having children at home for the term break, it is time for them to head back to school for the final term of the year. Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) remind drivers that school buses are back on the roads and that sometimes unpredictable things happen around school buses when they are stopped. Read More

Read All NewsRecent news

(Pictured: Sticksn'Stones Chairperson Ashleigh Smith with RWNZ National President, Fiona Gower in the UN General Assembly at the CSW62 Opening on Monday). 

 The opening of the 62nd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW62) was held on Monday, 12 March 2018 at the United Nations in New York. The Commission's priority theme for this year is 'Challenges and opportunities in achieving gender equality and the empowerment of rural women and girls'. The work of the Commission is to review the progress made by governments to improve the lives of women and girls in rural areas.

CSW62 is being held in the UN General Assembly and 175 member and observer states are represented. Along with the member states there are 10,000 delegates from 400 Non-Government Organisations (NGO) attending numerous events as part of the CSW62's activities.

The day commenced with the session being opened by the CSW Chair Ambassador Geraldine Byrne Nason from Ireland. She is also Ireland's Permanent Representative at the UN. Her address was followed by the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, and the President of the UN General Assembly Miroslav Lajcak. Other speakers included the Chair of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), a Representative of the Youth, and a Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences.

National Chair, Penny Mudford also attended the opening in her role as Civil Society Representative on the New Zealand Government delegation. Both Fiona and Penny attended the opening inside the General Assembly where only government delegations and selected NGO delegates are eligible to attend. It was a great privilege that RWNZ was represented in person at the opening of CSW62.

CSW62 runs until Friday, 23 March 2018 where it is expected to culminate in an Outcome Document which will capture the agreed outcomes in relation to rural women and girls for governments to implement resulting from the work done at this session of the Commission.

New Zealand also held a side event led by Dr Jackie Blue, NZ Human Rights Commission responsible for Womens Rights. The panel comprised Minister for Women Hon Julie Anne Genter, Renee Graham (Ministry for Women Chief Executive), Fiona Gower, Jo Finer (Fonterra), plus representatives from Argentina and Australia. The panel spoke on the topic of Case Studies of Economic Empowerment of Rural Women in New Zealand, Australia, and Argentina. The session was full with over 100 delegates from all around the world attending the panel session. There was keen interest in our message.

National Chair, Penny Mudford. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CSW62 Well Underway

Thursday, March 15, 2018

(Pictured: Sticksn'Stones Chairperson Ashleigh Smith with RWNZ National President, Fiona Gower in the UN General Assembly at the CSW62 Opening on Monday).   Read More

Thursday, 8 March marked this year's International Women's Day. As this year also celebrates 125 years since women in New Zealand won the the right to vote, the day was marked with significance.

Wednesday, 7 March was the launch of the Suffrage125 celebrations which was held at Government House and was attended by RWNZ Board Chair, Penny Mudford, Chief Executive Officer, Penelope England and Office Manager, Felicity Bunny. The launch was hosted by the Governor General, and RWNZ Patron Dame Patsy Reddy. The event was MC'd by journalist, Mihingarangi Forbes, and guest speakers included Minister for Women, Hon Julie Anne Genter and 2017 Young New Zealander of the Year, Rez Gardi.

The following day, Thursday, 8 March marked International Women's Day celebrations. RWNZ attended a breakfast at Parliament hosted by Zonta Wellington and the UN Women. RWNZ Chief Executive Officer Penelope England, and Communications, Marketing & Events Assistant, Catherine Stabb both attended the event.

Discussion topics at the event included recognition of the milestones made by women in New Zealand and the challenges that we still face. Rt Hon Helen Clark spoke of her successes, the obstacles she has faced and the how her rural background contributed to her personal strength, saying "rural people have to be very resilient".

Watch Rt Hon Helen Clark's Q&A with National Council of Women CEO Dr Gill Greer at the breakfast through the link here.

 

(Pictured below: Executive Officer Women’s Institute - Colleen Dryden, National Board Chair - Penny Mudford ONZM, National President Women’s Institute – Kay Hart, RWNZ Chief Executive Officer – Penelope England at the Suffrage125 launch at Government House.)

 


 

 

International Womens Day & Suffrage125

Friday, March 23, 2018

Thursday, 8 March marked this year's International Women's Day. As this year also celebrates 125 years since women in New Zealand won the the right to vote, the day was marked with significance.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has released a media release today following RWNZ's oral submission on the Trusts Bill. 

 

Please read the media release below. 

 

RURAL WOMEN NEED TO BE INVOLVED IN DECISION MAKING

 

 

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) influenced positive change for rural families and communities recently, through their oral submission to Parliament on the Trusts Bill.

“RWNZ submitted that both a rural impact and gender impact analysis be conducted on the legislation and intersectionality so that the Bill does not discriminate against women in any way,” says RWNZ National Chair, Penny Mudford.

“RWNZ research indicates that women can be shut out of a share of the family farm through old trusts that fail to acknowledge them in the family as beneficiaries.

“This can lead to women being discriminated against in the dissolution of a relationship where a trust is used to exclude them from a share in the family farm or farm business.

"These situations should not be happening in 2018 and we urge the government to uphold the international instruments and outcome statements when updating legislation such as with the Trusts Bill currently before the Justice Select Committee.

"In particular, the agreed conclusions that came out of the United Nations 62nd session of the Commission on the Status of Women, which were held in New York in March 2018, make it abundantly clear that government's policies and legislation should not disproportionately disadvantage women and girls living in the rural sector.

"Since trusts are a common type of farm ownership structure in New Zealand we need to be sure they are not being used to disadvantage those who would otherwise be entitled to a share of the farm asset through relationship property or inheritance if the asset was not held in trust," says Ms Mudford.

Ends

 

If you wish to read our oral submission, you can find it here

 


 

Rural women need to be involved in decision making.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has released a media release today following RWNZ's oral submission on the Trusts Bill.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand have released a media release raising our concerns for how data is being collected in this year's census.

Please read the media release below.

CENSUS DATA COLLECTION INTEGRITY QUESTIONED

This year’s census is in danger of not providing the data needed to make good decisions, says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“Whilst we understand and support the excitement of capturing our census data online, our concern is that many people still do not have access to internet while others might not have the capability or capacity to do so,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“The timing of the delivery of access code letters, which indicate that New Zealanders can opt for paper forms presents challenges for our rural communities, given that delivery of mail is taking longer and might only be delivered three days a week.

“The chances of a rural household without internet or with unreliable internet, receiving census paper forms in time for Tuesday, 6 March is slim, and that is concerning.

“RWNZ is doing everything possible to ensure our networks are aware of the new way of doing the Census although surely more thought should have gone in to how the valuable information about the lives and status of New Zealanders would be collected.

“Maybe this year, there could have been a concerted effort to use both electronic collection and paper collection to ensure integrity of the data,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

 

Please contact the National Office for more information.

 

 

National Office

Rural Women New Zealand

 

[email protected]

04 473 5524


 

 

(image source: www.census.govt.nz)

Census Data Collection Integrity Questioned

Monday, February 26, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand have released a media release raising our concerns for how data is being collected in this year's census.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to hear of the death of a nine-year-old boy whilst riding a quad bike in rural Waikato last night and our thoughts are extended to friends and family.

 

“It is very sad, but it need not have occurred. We need to prevent families and friends from the heartbreak of losing a loved one in such tragic circumstances,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

 

“RWNZ are concerned on two levels, one is children riding age appropriate quad bikes unsupervised and the other is children under the age of 16 riding adult-sized quad bikes.

 

“Last nights’ incident is an unfortunate but timely reminder of manufacturers recommendations that children under the age of 16 should not be riding adult-sized quad bikes.

 

“Children do not have the weight, strength or judgement to be operating these vehicles.

 

“Or if young children are riding age appropriate quad bikes, they need to be wearing a helmet and be supervised at all times.

 

“RWNZ encourage that anyone planning to use any form of machinery on farms receive training, and learn safe practices.

 

“It is heart breaking to receive news like this,” says Ms. Gower.

 

To find the media to which we have responded, follow the link here

 

 

 

Please contact us for further information

[email protected]


 

(photo source: www.nzherald.co.nz)

 

Another Preventable Rural Tragedy

Thursday, February 01, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to hear of the death of a nine-year-old boy whilst riding a quad bike in rural Waikato last night and our thoughts are extended to friends and family. Read More