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RECENT NEWS

Rural untracked parcels change

 

From 1 February, New Zealand Post customers will see the cost of sending untracked parcels to rural addresses increase by $3.70.

This charge, which was initially only placed on Tracked, Courier and Courier Signature parcels will now also be applied to untracked parcels sent to a rural address as a means to offset fixed costs associated with deliver to rural locations.

New Zealand Post has stated that these costs are a result of the continuing decrease in letter volumes.

 

Despite ongoing cost reductions made, this change is said to be necessary to continue to operate a sustainable network.

For business account customers, the change will take effect on 1 July 2018 as set out in their contacts.

 

 

Rural Post Prices to Change

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Rural untracked parcels change
 Read More

In March 2017, the Productivity Commission released a report recommending a number of changes to the way the Government funds and delivers Tertiary Education in New Zealand. RWNZ asked members for their feedback on the Productivity Commission’s Report, to inform on our submission to the Commission.
It was disappointing to see that the otherwise excellent report of the Productivity Commission largely bypassed the rural sector, as it is a unique sector with its own challenges.
Without these issues being specifically highlighted in the report, it is unlikely they will be directly addressed in any actions taken by government as a result of the report. Not only are the challenges faced by rural people of all ages seeking tertiary education likely to not be improved, their ability to access tertiary education could be reduced due to unforeseen consequences of changes made, albeit with the best intentions, that have not been rural-proofed. It was largely evident from the outset, and in the wording of the Scope, that the rural sector was not identified as a “priority group.” Where the report provided graphical and statistical information, the categories were either gender based, age based or with Māori/Pasifika, and in some cases Asian, identified as unique categories. Again, it has been identified that the rural sector is not being recognised.
Also concerning, is the perception that in general access to affordable, fast, reliable broadband has been assumed to be available to all learners. If so, then those on the wrong side of the “digital divide” will be further disadvantaged. The 527-page report from the Commission focused heavily on the way education is funded and the constraints and barriers resulting from that. The
benefits of access to quality tertiary education and the wide range of courses, included ACE funded courses, which categorised tertiary education, were also well covered in the report.

RWNZ’s submission with respect to the low number of students graduating with degrees in agricultural based subjects and the mismatch with the demand for skilled workers in primary production,
was also commented on in the report. The recommendations generally were ones that should have a positive impact on access to education, although how much, if at all, the rural sector would
benefit is unknown. This information needs to be specially addressed. In conclusion, RWNZ welcomes the report, and believes some very sensible recommendations were made. It is hoped that some of the proposals that are being considered will first be rural proofed so that impact can be measured. RWNZ would be happy to input into this process.

The Productivity Commission report is here: New models of tertiary education – the final report on the Commission’s tertiary education inquiry.

Background: 

In November 2015, the Government asked the Productivity Commission to examine how well New Zealand’s tertiary education system is set up to respond to, and take advantage of, trends in technology, internationalisation, demographics, tuition costs and demand for skills. We were also asked to identify potential barriers to innovation. 

The Commission’s report and its package of recommendations seek to give providers the scope to innovate in the delivery of tertiary education, and incentives to do so.
Key recommendations include:

  • better quality control and self-accreditation for strong performers;
  • strengthening the role of student demand in allocating funding to providers;
  • making it easier for students to transfer between courses;
  • abolishing University Entrance;
  • better careers education for young people;
  • enabling tertiary institutions to own and control their assets;
  • making it easier for new providers to enter the system; and
  • facilitating more and faster innovation by tertiary education providers.

Rural Women New Zealand published a submission for the Commission to consider in November 2016. Click here to download the Submission

SUBJECT Firearms Community Advisory Forum
DATE Thursday 18 August 2016
TIME 0930 –1210
VENUE Level 15 Conference Rooms 3 &4
ATTENDEES Catherine Petrey, Geoffrey Dunn,Chris Jamieson,Paul Gatland,Rob Ngamoki,Julia Penney,Ray Vine,Alastair (Roly)Williams, Poh Boey, Paul Clark,Helen Morgan,Nicole McKee, Matthew Gibson,John Herbert,Trevor Dyke,Andrew Edgcombe,John Howat,Trent Smith, Rachael Dean
APOLOGIES Chris Scahill, Kirsty Marshall, Debbie Wakker, MFAT
 
MINUTES
ITEM 1 – Welcome and introduction
The Chair welcomed the Forum’s members and introduced two new members, Rachael Dean from Rural Women NZ and Trent Smith from NZ Retail. Members were advised of safety procedures and evacuation protocol. The Chair stated that the forum would be conducted under the Chatham House Rules – members are free to use the information received during the course of the meeting, but neither the identity nor the affiliation of the speakers, may be revealed. The aim of the meeting is to open up lines of communication, and as a result, create a culture of trust.

 

ITEM 2 – Action Points from last Meeting
1. Wildlife (Powers) Amendment Bill
This Bill is currently before the Select Committee, which is reviewing the Departmental Report. The proposed amendments enhance rangers’ ability to detect and investigate offences against the Wildlife Act. Police investigated whether a consequential amendment to the Arms Act was required so that rangers could seize firearms in the course of their duty under the Bill. The Department of Conservation’s view is that there is no need for a special provision in the Bill as section 73 of the Arms Act specifies that “any person who seizes any article, being a firearm, airgun, pistol, imitation firearm, restricted weapon, ammunition, or explosive, in the exercise of a power conferred on him by any Act may have possession of that article so long as he is acting in the exercise of that power and in connection with his official duties”. Police’s legal team also confirmed that this should cover rangers taking possession of firearms in the course of their duty.
2. Permit date recorded on import permits to be date of issue (not date of application)
Police reported that this has been actioned and will now apply to all future applications for import permits.

 

3. Official Information Act Database
A Police action point is to record all OIA requests on firearm issues and the response to these on our website. This is a work in progress. Police will follow the example of other government agencies and redact the names of the requesters. It was noted that Police deals with far more official information requests than other agencies.
ITEM 3 – Cross-agency Firearms Working Group Update and Next Steps
The Working Group last met at the end of July and is working with Customs, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT), and the Department of Internal Affairs. Customs is reviewing internal processes and the Group is still following up on MFAT (processes between Police and MFAT) and the Department of Internal Affairs (leveraging the use of RealMe). Currently the Working Group is looking for Analysts to develop options. The Group will be looking for stakeholder input.
There was a presentation on the ‘Firearms Administration and Management’ project, where it was suggested that New Zealand’s firearms system is not making the best use of technology. Police is committed to ensuring that the community receives Better Public Services. Since New Zealand’s primary firearms legislation was introduced in 1983, areas of inefficiency have clearly emerged. Opportunities exist to make better use of modern technology, ensure consistency of service across the country, and improve information about firearms in New Zealand. It was theorised that if Police were able to make better use of technology, it will benefit both Police and the wider firearms community. It is envisaged that the Better Business Case framework will ensure clearer thinking and prevent failure in the future.

 

The Firearms Business Case will combine the development of the:
•Strategic case
•Economic case
•Commercial case
•Financial case, and
•Management case.
Multiple government bodies will be involved, including Police, Treasury and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE). As an example, the commercial case relates to procurement, so it will look to MBIE’s expertise, while the financial case would be consulted with Treasury. This consultation is crucial to ensuring the best understanding of ideas. Some members were wary that advice might not be sourced from people with the appropriate skill set, as they believed was the case with the Policing (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill. One member indicated that the Bill gave a blank cheque in what could be charged, as it included terms and phrases such as ‘costs’, ‘indirect costs’ and ‘potential costs of services that are not to be provided directly to the person who pays the fee or charge’. The member indicated that these terms are very broad and give little scope to audit those being charged.
Police is currently consolidating the strategic case and has:
•Completed the Investment logic mapping workshops
•Visited Police Districts to hear from the Firearms team members who provide services; and
•Begun preparing the ground work for the economic case – working on options for early 2017 (not including legislation).
There will be consultation on the economic case, before it is signed off by a Deputy Commissioner. Some members suggested that the underlying direction of the project might overly rely on good
internet access and that this might be problematic for rural communities. The presenter suggested
that internet access is just one aspect to the approach. For this reason, one member proposed that rural communities should have the opportunity to ‘rural-proof’ any options by ensuring they can contribute to the policy making process.
One member queried how much revenue generated from firearm licence fees and endorsements came back to Police. Police advised that firearms licensing1 by Police is funded from a combination of Crown revenue and revenue obtained from fees for applications for firearms licences, dealers’ licences, and firearm licence endorsements. The revenue obtained from fees was $3,103,723 in
2013/14 and $4,226,946 in 2014/15. This covers less than half the cost of firearm licensing, which can be seen from the output expense statements for firearms licensing included in the Police Annual Reports which record that the actual amounts spent on this output were $8,609,000 in 2013/14 and
$10,283,000 in 2014/15. The budget allocation in each of those years, funded from Crown and third party revenue, was $9,576,000 and $11,676,000 respectively.
Police indicated that fees and costs are being further analysed as a part of the Firearms project (also accessible on http://www.police.govt.nz/sites/default/files/publications/firearms-community- advisory-forum-minutes-may-2016.pdf). One member indicated that given concerns around whether the basis for calculating the charges was fair and equitable, the basis for particular fees should be as transparent as possible. One major reason for this is that the firearms community believes that they receive mediocre service. Police confirmed that this is going to be looked at in the project. Any adjustment to the level of Police resources will depend upon greater understanding of the problem and the outcome of the project. Members expressed concern about the amount of time that this will take. On the subject of costs, one member expressed disappointment with the fee-setting process and the inclusion of overheads in the Policing (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill and did not consider this to be the appropriate way to calculate fees.
ITEM 4 – Law and Order Committee Inquiry into illegal possession of firearms
The Law and Order Committee received 98 written submissions on the ‘Inquiry into the illegal possession of firearms’, including four late submissions. On 10, 17 and 24 August, submitters have been presenting oral submissions before the Committee. Police is currently preparing a Departmental Report based on the issues raised in the submissions. There is no clear indication of any recommendations that the Committee might be favouring, although common themes from the submissions include improving burglary resolution rates and noting the serial numbers of firearms in more cases. It is unclear when the committee will report back.
There are no major surprises from the submissions, although there is a fear being expressed by some submitters that members of the public have the ability to hack into Police’s database to find the names and details of firearms licence holders. Police continues to focus on maintaining safe and secure information to minimise the risk of successful hacking.
It is also important to note that it is not within the Committee’s remit to make recommendations about increasing Police numbers generally, or in rural communities. Members also expressed reservations about TradeMe’s submission which asked for access to Police’s national firearms licence register to electronically verify the details of firearms licence holders. Police explained that TradeMe had previously approached Police with a proposal to develop greater security around their firearm sales, and that if a database were developed, ultimately it would be available to commercial traders generally.

 

A member also raised concerns about the current mail order system (as required in section 43A of the Arms Act) and its inefficiencies, particularly in rural communities. Firearms users and sellers may not necessarily have a mobile or email address, but the forms require these details to purchase
1 This output covers the processing of applications for firearms licences, the issuing of licences, the verification of compliance with endorsed licences, enforcement, and the revocation of firearms licences. It also covers the work to ensure people who licences have expired have lawfully disposed of any firearms they have possessed.
a firearm. The forms are also not very easy to use, and may need to be altered. Members also questioned general duty constables’ knowledge of firearms. Police acknowledged that the system could be more user friendly. One member was of the view that the mail order system works for the most part. Police commented that people should consider going to their Arms Officer. However, one member indicated that this may involve considerable travel and cost for rural communities. The list of Arms Officers can found at http://www.police.govt.nz/advice/firearms/firearms- licensing-contact-details.
One member read from a copy of an email sent to Wellington Police by a person intending to purchase online using the available form who outlined considerable difficulties in completing the process, although Police advised that the person’s issues have been resolved.
Action point:
-Police to do some tidying up of the mail order system to ensure it can work smoothly. This issue can be revisited at the next meeting. Police will try to notify the forum ahead of this time if there are any changes.

 

ITEM 5 – Mountain Safety Council review
Police is not involved in the Mountain Safety Council’s (MSC) review and would prefer not to comment on it at this stage.
The MSC advised that it continues to review its programme, which includes engaging with relevant sector organisations that have a vested interested in firearms education. Its main focus remains on educating the firearms community and educating prospective firearm licence holders. A member expressed a desire for MSC to engage with the rural community, and the MSC suggested that they have already started doing so, having met Federated Farmers. The MSC have also run 22 workshops, where they have been able to engage with the firearm instructor network, many of whom have strong ties to rural communities.

 

ITEM 6 – Update on Firearms legislation
There have been no changes since the previous forum. The Minister of Police is likely to discuss this with Police at some point, but this will not happen until the completion of the Select Committee’s
‘inquiry into the illegal possession of firearms’. One possibility is that Police will produce a public discussion paper before any amendments proceed further, but this will depend on the Minister’s view. A possible legislative change that will proceed before other amendments to the Arms Act relates to introducing Firearm Prohibition Orders. A separate paper on this is being prepared for Government.
Police confirmed that it has not been proposing the formal registration of all firearms that might be in the system. In the past Police has not supported full registration of firearms if it was to try to capture the serial numbers of all firearms currently held by firearm licensees, partly because it would be very impractical to do so. Nevertheless, universal registration remains an idea, and will likely be considered by the Select Committee Inquiry. Recording more serial numbers than is currently the case, does have the potential to assist Police with matching more seized firearms with those lost through theft/burglaries.
Members expressed doubts about the idea of universal registration. There is a general fear, although one with no basis, that full registration will lead to confiscation of firearms. One member argued
that universal registration has not worked in any country and that Police databases are quite inaccurate anyway.
Police confirmed that there is no proposal being finalised with Government to reclassify all semi- automatic weapons as E category. Police is in the process of noting issues and coming up with possible options to present to the Minister.
If there were to be a public discussion paper it would be unusual to consult extensively prior to its release as that would be achieved through a widely available discussion paper that the public is consulted on, where it has a chance to present alternative options.

 

ITEM 7 – Other Business
Members advised that the public wants more information on safes and storage requirements. The firearms community is frustrated with the requirements behind what constitutes a legitimate safe. Some expressed concerns that some safes were deemed legitimate 2-3 years ago, but now fail tests. Police, however, notes that there are no new storage requirements – the same criteria continue to apply. If security standards are not met, then the onus is on the owner to prove that the safe is secure, as approved by a certified engineer. Police must also be satisfied that the engineer inspecting the safe has sufficient knowledge to certify that the safe is adequate. If someone has an issue with a decision relating to a safe, they should discuss the issue with an Arms officer who will contact Police National Headquarters. People can always email Police National Headquarters as well
– Police will do its best to resolve the certification issue. Forum members should expect to hear
more on this in the next few weeks, although this could be longer if an appeals process needs to be ironed out. A checklist for firearm officers and dealers on safe specifications is being prepared in the shorter term.

 

Action point:
Police to send out to the Forum the safe requirements checklist and to advise the Forum of the certification expectations when that exercise is completed.
There is general dissatisfaction with how long it takes to get firearm import permits. Often people are getting lawyers involved because it is a slow and onerous process. There is a sense that Police is very poorly resourced in this area. Police commented that it is in the process of resolving this issue, and that the waiting time has reduced significantly. The remaining permits that have lengthy waiting periods should be processed in the next couple of weeks.
Last year there were some issues with firearms licence renewals, with one person’s licence taking eight months to renew. This issue stemmed from staffing issues within Police and the peak in the applications for renewals. This has now been reduced to normal waiting times.
It was mentioned that there was a rumour that dealers’ fees were about to be substantially increased. Police advised that it is not possible for Police to unilaterally and arbitrarily raise fees associated with getting firearms or dealers’ licences – Police has to demonstrate to Government that increases are based on costs that are necessary and reasonable. It was noted that Police collected
$4,226,946 from fees for firearm licences, which accounted for approximately 50% of Police’s costs
in administering the Arms Act.
The next meeting is scheduled for 8 December 2016, 9:30am – 12:30pm.

 

 

Summary of the Firearms Community Advisory Forum Meeting: Thursday 18 August 2016

1. THE MINUTES OF THE PREVIOUS MEETING WERE CONFIRMED
2. ACTION POINTS FROM LAST MEETING
a) WILDLIFE (POWERS) AMENDMENT BILL: The Select Committee is currently considering this Bill. The proposed amendments enhance rangers’ ability to detect and investigate offences against the Wildlife Act. No consequential amendment to the Arms Act required. Rangers already have the ability to seize firearms in the course of their duty under the Wildlife Act and the current section 73 of the Arms Act covers the situation.
b) PERMIT DATE RECORDED ON IMPORT PERMITS TO BE DATE OF ISSUE (NOT DATE OF APPLICATION): Police reported that this has been actioned and will now apply to all future applications for import permits.
c) OFFICIAL INFORMATION ACT DATABASE: A Police action point is to record all OIA requests on firearm issues and the response to these on its website. Police will follow the example of other government agencies and redact the names of the requesters. It should be noted that Police deals with far more official information requests than other agencies.
3. CROSS-AGENCY FIREARMS WORKING GROUP UPDATE AND NEXT STEPS: The Working Group is working with Customs, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade (MFAT), and the Department of Internal Affairs. Customs is reviewing internal processes and the Group is still following up on MFAT and the Department of Internal Affairs. A bulletin was sent to Police staff on 16 August, and the Group seeks input from relevant stakeholders.
The firearms system suffers from a number of clear inefficiencies. In theory, Police believes that better use of technology would benefit both Police and the wider firearms community. The Better Business Case framework will ensure clearer thinking and prevent failure in the future. There are five key sections that have been identified for development in the Firearms Business Case, including strategic, economic, commercial, financial and management cases. Multiple government bodies will be involved, including Police, Treasury and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE). Police is currently consolidating the strategic case and has completed Investment Logic Mapping workshops, visited Districts to hear from the Firearms team members who provide services, and begun preparing the ground work for the economic case. There will be consultation on the strategic case before it is signed off by a Deputy Commissioner.
Police outlined that $4,226,946 was collected in 2014/15 from firearm licence fees and endorsements, and indicated that fees and costs are being further analysed as a part of the Firearms project. This figure can also be found at http://www.police.govt.nz/sites/default/files/publications/firearms-community-advisory-forum-minutes-may-2016.pdf. Police confirmed that fee transparency is going to be looked at in the project.
4. LAW AND ORDER COMMITTEE INQUIRY INTO ILLEGAL POSSESSION OF FIREARMS: On 10, 17 and 24 August, oral submissions on the ‘Inquiry into issues relating to the illegal possession of firearms’ were presented to the Law and Order Committee. Police is currently preparing a Departmental Report based on the issues raised in the written and oral submissions. Common themes from the submissions include improving burglary resolution rates and more frequently noting the serial numbers of firearms. It is unclear when the Committee will report back. A number of submitters fear that Police’s firearms database is vulnerable to being hacked. Police continues to focus on maintaining safe and secure information to minimise the risk of successful hacking. There have also been several comments about Police resourcing of firearm matters. Police acknowledged that the mail order system, required in section 43A of the Arms Act, could be more user friendly. Police will tidy up the mail order system to ensure that it will be run more smoothly.
5. MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL REVIEW: MSC continues to review its programme, which includes engaging with partners and anybody that has a vested interested in firearms. Its main focus remains on educating the firearms community and educating prospective firearm licence holders. MSC has started consulting the rural community. Police is not involved in the review.
6. UPDATE ON FIREARMS LEGISLATION: There have been no changes since the previous forum. The Minister of Police will probably discuss this with Police, but it is unlikely to happen until after the completion of the Select Committee’s ‘Inquiry into issues relating to the illegal possession of firearms’. Firearm Prohibition Orders may potentially proceed before other amendments to the Arms Act. A separate paper on this is being prepared for Government. Police confirmed that it has not been recommending a formal registration of all firearms that might be in the system. However, registration will probably be considered by the Select Committee. There is a general fear within the firearms community that full registration will lead to confiscation of firearms, but this has no basis. Recording more serial numbers may potentially assist Police with matching more seized firearms with those lost in burglaries. Police confirmed that there is no proposal being finalised with Government for the reclassification of all semi-automatic weapons. Police is in the process of noting issues and mooting possible options to present to the Minister.
OTHER BUSINESS:
7. SAFES: Members were advised that the public wants more information on safes and storage requirements. The firearms community is frustrated with the requirements for what constitutes a legitimate safe. Some expressed concerns that some safes were deemed legitimate 2-3 years ago, but now fail tests. Police, however, notes that there are no new storage requirements – the same criteria continue to apply. If security standards are not met, then the onus is on the owner to prove that the safe is secure, as approved by a suitable engineer. If someone has an issue with a decision relating to a safe, they should discuss the issue with an Arms officer who will contact Police National Headquarters. Forum members should expect to hear more on this issue in the next few weeks, although this could be longer if an appeals process needs to be ironed out. A checklist for firearm officers and dealers on safe specifications is being prepared in the shorter term.
8. IMPORT PERMITS: There is general dissatisfaction with how long it takes to get firearm import permits. Often lawyers are getting involved because it is a slow and onerous process. Police commented that it is working to resolve this issue, and that the waiting time has reduced significantly. Remaining permits that have lengthy waiting periods should be processed in the next two weeks.
9. FIREARMS LICENCE RENEWALS: Last year there were some issues with firearm licence renewals, which stemmed from staffing issues within Police and having reached the peak of the ten year bell curve relating to the number of applications received. Delays have now been reduced to normal waiting times.
10. DEALERS FEES: There have been rumours that dealers’ fees will be increased substantially. Police advised that it is not possible for them to unilaterally and arbitrarily raise fees associated with getting firearms or dealers’ licences.

 

From November 1st, New Zealand Post is making changes to rural deliveries in some regions.

Changes to the Deed of Understanding with the Government in 2013 allowed New Zealand Post to move to five day delivery in rural areas. From 1 November, more delivery runs will move from six to five days a week. Currently about 15% of rural customers are on five day delivery and this will increase to about 25%.

“We’ve been able to maintain a six day service for three quarters of our rural customers nationwide, but in some places, we don’t have enough items coming through the network for a six day service to be sustainable,” says Mark Stewart, Chief Operating Officer, Customer Service Delivery.

“We’ll be notifying rural delivery customers affected by this change in the next few weeks,” says Mark Stewart. “They’ll continue to be able to send and receive parcels and letters Monday to Friday.”

“We’re working hard to give our rural customers the best possible service at the same time as maintaining a commercially sound rural delivery network,” says Mark Stewart.

“With the growth in online shopping, we’re also improving sending, delivering and tracking options for our rural customers,” says Mark Stewart. “The majority of rural contractors are now equipped with scanners, providing customers with better tracking information and the convenience of being able to know when parcels will arrive.”

New Zealand Post is in the process of talking to its rural contractors about the changes. The runs affected are mainly in Southland and Otago as well as parts of Tasman, Nelson, the West Coast, North Canterbury, Hawke’s Bay and Gisborne.

 


 

 

NZ Post announce changes to rural deliveries

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

From November 1st, New Zealand Post is making changes to rural deliveries in some regions. Read More

Nomination forms have been posted to the branches. The forms have been emailed to members with email addresses and will soon be available in the member’s section of the website. The forms in the booklet may be copied or torn out and posted back to National Office.

Along with the forms, the following documents have been posted and emailed to branches and are in the members’ section of the website:

- The Area Committee and Leadership Council Terms of Reference

- Statement of Finance and Independent Review

- By-laws and Policy.

The following time frame is applicable:

After May - meeting Call for Nominations

1 August - Nominations close

September - Voting papers prepared

15 September - Voting Papers out

31 October - Voting closes.

 

Are you passionate about growing rural communities? Improving the lives of women?

Would you like to be involved in setting the future direction of Rural Women New Zealand? This is a valuable opportunity for you to contribute to our goal of building and supporting people in our rural communities.

We are looking for people who have some of the following skills and experience:

  • Strategic expertise: the ability to guide and review strategy through constructive questioning and suggestion
  • Accounting and finance: the ability to read and understand the not-for-profit accounts and financial material presented to the board
  • Managing risk: experience in managing areas of risk for organisations
  • Marketing: experience in marketing and promotions
  • Cyber/digital innovation and expertise: the ability to govern our organisation to navigate successfully in the digital world
  • Legal expertise: legal experience and knowledge
  • Experience: experience in similar not-for-profit organisations, sectors or industries, such as health, education, social services and land issues
  • Common sense: the ability to find pragmatic solutions to issues, and to work constructively with your peers
  • Passion: a genuine passion for the cause.

The Board’s accountability involve:

  • Strategy: providing strategic direction for Rural Women New Zealand 
  • Governance: ensuring Rural Women New Zealand is governed robustly and has appropriate policies to comply with legal requirements 
  • Auditing and Monitoring: appointing auditors and monitoring management of Rural Women New Zealand. 

Each board member must also meet certain standards of conduct:

  • Duty of Care: aboard member must exercise ‘reasonable care’ when he or she makes a decision for Rural Women New Zealand. In this case, ‘reasonable’ is what a prudent person in a similar situation might do.
  • Duty of Integrity: a board member must never use information gained through his or her position for personal gain, but must always act in the best interests of Rural Women New Zealand.
  • Duty of Loyalty: a board member must be faithful to the Rural Women New Zealand’s mission, and cannot act in a way that is inconsistent with our goals.

Being a board member also involves meeting legal obligations, including the following:

  • Health and Safety: a board member must exercise due diligence to ensure Rural Women New Zealand complies with its health and safety duties and obligations
  • Ensuring Solvency: a board member must not allow the Rural Women New Zealand to embark on a path that carries serious risk of non-payment to creditors.

 

If this sounds like the sort of challenge that would interest you, please apply for this exciting opportunity today using the nomination forms.


 

Nomination Forms for the Board

Thursday, May 26, 2016
 Read More

A $3000 education scholarship is available for health professionals with an interest in the rural sector. 

The Rural Women New Zealand and Access Scholarship is aimed at applicants who are working in the health field with rural connections, and wish to further their studies in health or disability studies. Preference will be given to applicants who are studying at post-graduate level.

“Access is proud to support ongoing professional development for health professionals working in the rural community, and we are pleased to continue to offer the scholarship alongside Rural Women New Zealand,” says Simon Lipscombe, Chief Executive of Access.

Wendy McGowan, National President of Rural Women New Zealand says the organisation is committed to offering the scholarship to rural health professionals. “We advocate for equity in health services in rural communities on a par with urban areas. That includes upskilling our health professionals to offer quality information and advice to rural patients,” says Wendy McGowan.

Last year the scholarship was awarded to Heather Leong, a Community Registered Nurse based in Waikato. Heather intended to use the scholarship to fund her studies to complete an International Integrative Nurse Coach Certificate in the United States.

Heather planned to apply the skills gained from her studies in her nursing work in the Waikato rural community.

Applications close on 1 July 2016.

Click here for application information and form.

 

Applications closing soon for health education scholarship

Friday, April 22, 2016

A $3000 education scholarship is available for health professionals with an interest in the rural sector.  Read More

Women Walk the World is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World.

It’s a great way to come together, catch up with friends and have some fun and healthy exercise along the way.

The date for the event is Friday 29 April– ACWW Day - though walks can take place at other dates around that time if more convenient.

Here’s What You Do:

1.Decide on a walk for your group. It can range from a stroll around the park, a hike through the bush, an amble around a neighbourhood or along a walkway.
2.Invite others. This is a great way to reach out to new potential members, and include families and friends.
3.Go to the online registration form, fill it in and email [email protected] or post to national office before your walk, so we know what walks are taking place and can promote them.
4.We have t shirts and pedometers for groups that register. Initially one set per group on a first-come, first-served basis. These will be sent on receipt of your registration form.
5.The idea is to raise funds. This could be done through sponsorship, a gold coin donation, or perhaps an afternoon tea or sausage sizzle afterwards. Here is a sponsorship form you can use.
6.Tally up the number of people who attend and the distance walked.
7.Take photos and send to national office so we can publicise your walks and use on our website and Facebook pages. Email [email protected]
8.Send your funds raised, and details of kilometres walked to national office.

 

Photos from Walk the world events to come!

 

 

More About The Work Of ACWW

ACWW connects and supports women and communities worldwide by:

• Working in partnership with member societies to offer mutual support
• Connecting at international level through UN representation
• Funding community development projects
• Supporting agricultural initiatives
Find out more about ACWW here.

 

Women Walk the World 2016

Thursday, January 21, 2016

Women Walk the World is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World. Read More

Joanne Taylor’s rural lifestyle magazine Latitude has won the supreme award at the Enterprising Rural Women Awards held in Nelson on Saturday 21 November.

“In the seven years of this competition we have seen vibrant rural businesses increasingly appeal to urban residents, tourists and the rural community. This has been reflected in the winning rural business woman Joanne Taylor, who has succeeded in pursuing her publishing dream, while also supporting New Zealand’s rural communities,” says Wendy McGowan, National President, Rural Women New Zealand.


Joanne Taylor was the NZ Post sponsored ‘Making it in Rural’ category winner (watch Joanne's video here); however, there were three other exceptional category winners:

 

  • Help, I Need Somebody category winner (Sponsored by Irricon Resource Solutions): Bronwyn Muir for providing farmers health and safety advice through OnFarmSafety NZ. Watch Bronwyn's Video here.

  • Love of the Land category winner (sponsored by Agrisea): Marie Taylor for her restoration of native plants through her nursery Plant Hawkes Bay Limited. Watch Marie's Video here.

  • Stay, Play Rural category winner (sponsored by Rural Women NZ): Kate Belcher for her Glenorchy outdoor adventure bike tour company, Revolution Tours. Watch Kate's Video here. 

“This year the judges have awarded additional certificates of special recognition for two dynamic rural women who are contributing to their local community through their entrepreneurial spirit,” says Wendy McGowan.

“Chanelle Purser owner of Carvin Streetwear in Gore impressed us with her retail success and commitment to youth in rural communities. The judges awarded her a Certificate for Emerging Enterprising Young Rural Woman at the awards ceremony. Watch Chanelle's Video here.

We also recognised another outstanding businesswoman Bridget Canning of WizWireless Limited, for her contribution to rural telecommunications services for Wairarapa residents. The judges admired her dedication and ingenuity, and awarded her a Certificate of Special Recognition as an Enterprising Rural Woman." Watch Bridget's Video here

Photo caption, left to right: Chanelle Purser, Marie Taylor, Joanne Taylor, RWNZ National President Wendy McGowan, Kate Belcher, Bronwyn Muir and  Bridget Canning. 

For award winners profile information click here.

For further quotes contact:

Wendy McGowan, National President, Rural Women NZ

Ph: (07) 332 3586 or 027 222 7015


Now's time to embrace your New Year’s resolutions! Register for the free REVEAL course being held at the Whangarei Showgrounds on 10 March 2015.


REVEAL is a one day course that will inspire and challenge you to reach your potential, designed by 2013 NEXT Businesswoman of the Year and executive director of the Agri-Women’s Development Trust, Lindy Nelson.  
Lindy Nelson is being brought to Northland by Rural Women New Zealand at the instigation of Dargaville member and CEO of the Kaipara Community Health Trust, Debbie Evans. 

Debbie says, “In 2014 I attended the Rural Women New Zealand Growing Dynamic Leaders course in Wellington, which Lindy Nelson helped facilitate. I came away from Lindy’s presentation challenged and re-energised, thinking ‘I need to bring this fabulous woman to Northland to inspire others.’

“We have so many volunteers putting in hours of effort to enhance our communities, schools, service and sports clubs, emergency services etc, but many rural people don’t get the opportunity for facilitated personal development.”

The REVEAL course will help women recognise their unique skills and strengths, build confidence and help them reach their full potential.

“You’ll learn new tips that help recharge your batteries and receive confirmation and acknowledgement of the skills you already have and regularly use,” says Debbie.

The Whangarei REVEAL course is free to participants, thanks to funding from the Lottery Grants Board and Community Organisations Grants Scheme and is limited to 150 attendees.

Debbie urges, “Arrange a day’s annual leave, find a baby sitter, bring your mother, neighbour, sister along - everyone over the age of 16 is welcome. You don’t need to be a Rural Women® member to attend”.

Women from the Far North to Franklin Districts are encouraged to register by 28 February by emailing Kath on [email protected] or phone/texting Debbie on 027 558 6272.

Details: Whangarei Showgrounds, 10 March, 10am-4pm

Northland REVEAL Leadership Programme 10 March 2015

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Now's time to embrace your New Year’s resolutions! Register for the free REVEAL course being held at the Whangarei Showgrounds on 10 March 2015. Read More

A movie premiere was a stylish way to end the 2014 UN International Year of Family Farming celebrations, in which Rural Women New Zealand has played a central part. 

Our national president Wendy McGowan was at the Wellington launch on 25 November, along with national office staff.

The movie "Family Farming in New Zealand - Our Stories" uses historic footage showing vignettes of family farming from the 1940s through to today. It was directed by Hugh Macdonald, and we hope to have copies on sale through our website shop as soon as they are available.

At the launch Brendan Hoare, chair of the 2014 UN International Year of Family Farming NZ co-ordinating committee that commissioned the film, says his committee is thrilled to have been able to make this original and significant contribution to documenting the history and importance of family farming in New Zealand. He also acknowledged that Rural Women New Zealand was the most committed organisation to celebrate the International Year of Family Farming, "as one would expect."

“Family farming is currently facing threats and challenges right around the world,” said Mr Hoare. “That's why the United Nations agreed it was worth dedicating a whole year to raising its profile, and encouraging governments and civil society organisations to support the valuable contribution family farming has made and can make to economic, social and environmental well-being.”

Rural Women New Zealand also ran its own photo and story competition, in conjunction with Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), which will be used to promote the New Zealand farming story in our overseas markets. View the wonderful photos that came in.

We also held a series of roadshows around the country in the first half of the year.

Acknowledging Rural Women New Zealand's lead role in the year, Brendan Hoare says: 

"Big thanks, deep gratitude and sincere appreciation for your contribution to the 2014 UN IYFF. 

We did well given the 100% voluntary contribution of our work. Our performance included: Investigative workshops, a launch at Parliament, multiple engagements over a range of means through conferencing, investigations, presentations, lobbying, media, publications, editorials and attendance at international conferences.

The NZ team celebrated the completed the 2014 UN's International Year of Family Farming with the premier of our commissioned movie 'Family Farming in New Zealand: Our Stories.' This was a tremendous achievement given our budget and time-frame. Some of the footage Hugh Macdonald and his team were able to conjure together is a remarkable and valuable reflection of whom we once were, and how fast times are changing. Sector leaders at the premier commented on how little we know of our past and important it is to document the past and present. Ka pai Hugh."

A Wrap for IYFF 26-Nov-2014

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

A movie premiere was a stylish way to end the 2014 UN International Year of Family Farming celebrations, in which Rural Women New Zealand has played a central part.  Read More

Read All NewsRecent news

Congratulations to the National Competition Winners for 2017

Tarrant Bell & Tutaenui Bell Speech contest topic: “Why Not?”

Tutaenui Bell and Tarrant Bell

1st Place Alex Thompson, Amuri Dinner Branch, Region 2

2nd Place Leona Trimble, Hampden Branch, Region 1


Marlborough Short Story & Olive Burdekin short story “ What a Fuss”

1000-1500 words for Marlborough Short Story – Kerry France, Moa Flat Branch, Region 1 for “Guess what I am.” Dominion Essay Tray and voucher from Region 3

 

1500- 2000 words for Olive Burdekin – Chrissy Sumby, Kenepuru Branch, Region 3 for “Bay Swimming” Voucher from Region 3

 

Cora Wilding- insulated Pot Stand - any medium

Melva Robb – Marlborough Provincial, 1st Place, Region 3


Olive Craig Trophy Member of Excellence (Judged by the National Board) Sue Hall Region 6


Talbot Trophy- best Provincial, Branch or Group International Officer report

International Officer - Melva Robb – Marlborough Provincial, 1st Place, Region 3

 

The Honora O’Neill Gong is for the best Provincial, Sandra Curd, Mid Canterbury Region 2

 

Branch or Group President’s Report: Carolyn McLellan, Bainham Branch Region 3

The Lady Blundell Tray Competition

for the most innovative project completed by an individual, Group, Branch, Provincial or Region.

Winner: Amuri Dinner Group.


 

National Competition Winners 2017

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Congratulations to the National Competition Winners for 2017 Read More

Rural untracked parcels change

 

From 1 February, New Zealand Post customers will see the cost of sending untracked parcels to rural addresses increase by $3.70.

This charge, which was initially only placed on Tracked, Courier and Courier Signature parcels will now also be applied to untracked parcels sent to a rural address as a means to offset fixed costs associated with deliver to rural locations.

New Zealand Post has stated that these costs are a result of the continuing decrease in letter volumes.

 

Despite ongoing cost reductions made, this change is said to be necessary to continue to operate a sustainable network.

For business account customers, the change will take effect on 1 July 2018 as set out in their contacts.

 

 

Rural Post Prices to Change

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Rural untracked parcels change
 Read More

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events.

The Rural Support Trust advise farmers to ensure stock and domestic animals have food, water, and shelter where necessary, and are secure. Ensure that all stock injuries are promptly attended too, after human needs are met.

If your farm or rural property or stock has been affected by an adverse event and you need assistance, contact your local Rural Support Trust on 0800 787 254 (0800 RURAL HELP) with information on the impacts on your farm, or requests for help.

The Rural Women New Zealand Adverse Events and Relief Fund is available to individuals, communities and groups, with a particular emphasis on rural women and children. The fund provides financial assistance to persons or groups, where there is an identified urgent need due to recent adverse events such as drought, fires, floods or earthquakes.

Click here to read more about applying for the fund.

Contact details for support agencies:

The Rural Support Trust (RST organise community events and one-on-one mentoring, as well as targeted support services in emergency situations)  
http://www.rural-support.org.nz Ph: 0800 787 254.

DairyNZ: Sharemilkers support http://www.dairynz.co.nz/farm/tactics/support-for-sharemilkers/

Federated Farmers http://www.fedfarm.org.nz/ Ph: 0800 327 646 or drought feedline 0800 376 844.

Doug Avery’s Resilient Farmer http://www.resilientfarmer.co.nz/

Farmstrong http://www.farmstrong.co.nz


If you just want to talk, or know someone who is at risk, there are a range of support options available, including counselling services:

Lifeline: 0800 543 354 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling

Youthline: 0800 376 633 or free text 234 - Provides 24 hour telephone and text counselling services for young people

Samaritans: 0800 726 666 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling.

Women's Refuge: 0800 REFUGE (733 843) a 24/7 crisis and support line provide advice and information.

Shakti New Zealand 0800SHAKTI (0800 742 584) If you are in a situation of domestic violence call our 24-hour crisis line, and multi-lingual staff will provide information.

Tautoko: 0508 828 865 - provides support, information and resources to people at risk of suicide, and their family, whānau and friends.

What'sup: 0800 942 8787 (0800 What’s Up) is a counselling helpline for children and young people, aged 5-18. Phone Mon-Fri 1-10pm, Sat-Sun 3-10pm.

Kidsline: 0800 543 754, it is a 24/7 helpline for children and teens, run by specially trained youth volunteers.

Thelowdown.co.nz - Free Text 5626, watch videos or contact for support. 

depression.org.nz National Depression Initiative (for adults), 0800 111 757 - 24 hour service 

Ministry for Children Oranga Tamariki If you're worried about a child or family that you know, there are ways you can help, contact Child, Youth and Family.

For information about suicide prevention, see http://www.spinz.org.nz .

If it is an emergency, or you feel yourself, or someone you know is at risk, please call 111.

Rural community support services

Thursday, April 06, 2017

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events. Read More

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World.

It’s a great way to come together, catch up with friends and have some fun and healthy exercise along the way.

The date for the event is Sunday 29 April– ACWW Day - though walks can take place at other dates around that time if more convenient.

Here’s What You Do:

1.Decide on a walk for your group. It can range from a stroll around the park, a hike through the bush, an amble around a neighbourhood or along a walkway.
2.Invite others. This is a great way to reach out to new potential members, and include families and friends.
3.Go to the registration form , fill it in and email [email protected] or post to national office before your walk, so we know what walks are taking place and can promote them.
4.Fund raise through sponsorship, a gold coin donation, or perhaps an afternoon tea or sausage sizzle afterwards.
5.Tally up the number of people who attend and the distance walked.
6.Take photos and send to national office so we can publicise your walks and use on our website and Facebook pages. Email [email protected]
7.Send your funds raised, and details of kilometres walked to national office.

 

 


 

More About The Work Of ACWW

ACWW connects and supports women and communities worldwide by:

• Working in partnership with member societies to offer mutual support
• Connecting at international level through UN representation
• Funding community development projects
• Supporting agricultural initiatives
Find out more about ACWW here.

Women Walk the World 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World. Read More

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.

RWNZ was one of the founding members of ACWW. It is one of the largest international development organisations for rural women.

The ACWW network allows it to engage at the local, national, and international level with the aim of achieving these goals:

- To raise the standard of living for rural women and their families through education, training and community development programmes.

- To provide practical support to our members and help them set up income-generating schemes.

- To support educational opportunities for women and girls, and help eliminate gender discrimination.

- To give rural women a voice at an international level through our links with UN agencies and bodies.

Caption: Delegates from the South Pacific Area Conference in New Plymouth complete the ACWW Walk the World event in April 2017. 

Click here to download an information booklet about ACWW (8MB PDF)

Click here to go to the ACWW website

 

ACWW Study Topic 2017

Friday, June 16, 2017

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.  Read More

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents.

Mr Leggett says the honours are an opportunity to recognise members of the community who give outstanding service to others.

“The recipients use their skills and energy and give their time and talents to a myriad of organisations and causes. They are serving us all by contributing to the greater good and each deserves our grateful thanks,” he said.

Severe earthquakes hit on 14 November 2016 affecting rural people in North Canterbury, Kaikōura and South Marlborough. Melva and Glenda spearheaded delivery of relief supplies to remote rural families.They teamed up with the local Rural Support Trust and Federated Farmers, to contact as many residents as they could to assess what was needed other than food.

“Melva and Glenda’s personal compassion which comes with a loving dollop of practical help, alleviated the sense of isolation and trauma families were experiencing from the Clarence to South Marlborough and the Awatere Valley,” says RWNZ Marlborough member Barbara Stuart. “They took the crisis seriously and did everything in their power to help.”

Glenda and Melva appealed to RWNZ members and the wider community for donations of crockery and dinner sets. They prepared 100 gift baskets of baking, chocolates and soft toys for children and managed to get supplies onto transport that was headed to isolated areas. They even sent a gift basket via helicopter for a family with a new-born baby, who were isolated at the top of the Awatere Valley.

 

The other honours recipients this year are Ross Beech, a farmer-environmentalist and a member of the South Marlborough Landscape Restoration Trust; Jim Thomas, a Lions Club member with a record of service to sport and who has a key role in the local Victim Support service, and Henny Vervaart, a Rotary Club member, Red Cross meals-on-wheels volunteer and a valued part of the Alzheimers Marlborough organisation.

Ends


 

 

Civic Award for Melva Robb and Glenda Robb

Monday, October 09, 2017

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents. Read More