welcome back, !

 

RECENT NEWS

(Pictured: RWNZ Board Member and National Finance Chair, Rachael Dean, and Manager of Government, Public Sector and Academic Relationships, Angela McLeod presenting to the Primary Production Committee.)

 

RWNZ has released a media release about our oral submission to the Primary Production Committee on the Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Bill.

Please read the media release below.

RUSTLING NEEDS TO BE AN OFFENCE

Rural communities need solid action from Parliament’s Primary Production Select Committee on livestock rustling says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“We presented our oral submission in support of the Sentencing (Livestock Rustling) Amendment Bill to the Primary Production Committee yesterday, and called for more to be done to enable and empower New Zealand’s rural communities,” says RWNZ National Finance Chair, Rachael Dean.

“The Committee as a whole was supportive of the submissions which is great to see, however this support needs to be followed by actions starting with rustling being made an offence.

“Secondly, there needs to be effective punishment and powers to seize, both of which will act as a deterrent to rustlers.

“The current situation with rustling is simply not being dealt with adequately, and it is resulting in significant financial loss for our rural communities.

“In addition to financial loss the emotional and mental wellbeing of rural families is affected by rustling which places additional stress on communities.

“It is critical that legislation exists to provide adequate support and protection for our rural communities - they are the backbone of our country.

“Amendments made to the Sentencing Act as proposed in this bill are crucial, however the fact remains that other pieces of legislation need to be fit-for-purpose. RWNZ wants this latter issue reported back to the House by the Select Committee,” says Ms Dean.

Ends

Kind regards,

Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]

Rustling Needs to be an Offence

Monday, April 16, 2018

 Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release today, outlining our concern with the announcement of a proposal to curtail rescue helicopter service bases in Taupō, Rotorua and Te Anau.

 

Please follow this link to the media which we have responded to. 

 

Read our media release below. 

 

 

RESCUE HELICOPTER DECISION PUTS LIVES AT RISK


Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is concerned with the announcement of a proposal to curtail rescue helicopter service bases in Taupō, Rotorua and Te Anau.

“The closure of these bases will inevitably mean that people who are in need of immediate care are consequently waiting longer for medical attention, which is a concern”, says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“People traveling through, living, working or enjoying outdoor pursuits within these areas are already isolated due to the nature of the geography.

“With winter fast approaching, there will be harsher conditions on the roads and along tracks where accidents are more likely to happen.

“This decision fails to recognise the golden hour – where minutes can mean life or death.

“It is vital that communities and people travelling through areas which are a significant distance to major hospitals can feel safe knowing that medical care is accessible.

“It’s about making sure everyone has access to immediate medical care, and we are concerned that the closure of helicopter bases critically impacts on the emergency services required for travellers and our rural communities in need,” says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

(img source: www.youtube.com)

 

Rescue Helicopter Decision Puts Lives At Risk

Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release today, outlining our concern with the announcement of a proposal to curtail rescue helicopter service bases in Taupō, Rotorua and Te Anau. Read More

Friday, 6 April was the date of the National Rural Health Conference, held in the Pullman, Auckland. 

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) presented at the Conference on the shortage of midwives currently faced by New Zealanders, particularly rural communities.To read more about the conference, you can follow their website here

RWNZ Board Member, and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway has done substantial work in urging support for New Zealand midwives and women living and working rurally. The paper presented at the National Rural Health Conference was written by Mrs Pittaway and presented by RWNZ National President, Fiona Gower.

 

To read the paper, you can download it here

 

 

 

RWNZ Present at the National Rural Health Conference 2018

Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Friday, 6 April was the date of the National Rural Health Conference, held in the Pullman, Auckland.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has released a media release today following RWNZ's oral submission on the Trusts Bill. 

 

Please read the media release below. 

 

RURAL WOMEN NEED TO BE INVOLVED IN DECISION MAKING

 

 

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) influenced positive change for rural families and communities recently, through their oral submission to Parliament on the Trusts Bill.

“RWNZ submitted that both a rural impact and gender impact analysis be conducted on the legislation and intersectionality so that the Bill does not discriminate against women in any way,” says RWNZ National Chair, Penny Mudford.

“RWNZ research indicates that women can be shut out of a share of the family farm through old trusts that fail to acknowledge them in the family as beneficiaries.

“This can lead to women being discriminated against in the dissolution of a relationship where a trust is used to exclude them from a share in the family farm or farm business.

"These situations should not be happening in 2018 and we urge the government to uphold the international instruments and outcome statements when updating legislation such as with the Trusts Bill currently before the Justice Select Committee.

"In particular, the agreed conclusions that came out of the United Nations 62nd session of the Commission on the Status of Women, which were held in New York in March 2018, make it abundantly clear that government's policies and legislation should not disproportionately disadvantage women and girls living in the rural sector.

"Since trusts are a common type of farm ownership structure in New Zealand we need to be sure they are not being used to disadvantage those who would otherwise be entitled to a share of the farm asset through relationship property or inheritance if the asset was not held in trust," says Ms Mudford.

Ends

 

If you wish to read our oral submission, you can find it here

 


 

Rural women need to be involved in decision making.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has released a media release today following RWNZ's oral submission on the Trusts Bill.  Read More

 

RWNZ has released a media release responding to the introduction of the 5G network in New Zealand.

 

Please read relevant media here.

 

RURAL COMMUNITIES DESERVE BETTER TECHNOLOGY

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are concerned that the roll-out of the 5G network short-changes rural New Zealand as many still struggle with basic cell phone coverage.

“The news that 5G cell phone technology will be rolled out by 2020 is great for some but not for all, and that is what bothers us,” says RWNZ Board Member and Technology Portfolio Convenor, Rachael Dean.

“Many of our rural communities do not have internet or cell phone access at all, let alone that of a high quality standard and the 5G roll-out seems yet another example of doing the easy stuff at the expense of rural New Zealand.

“Approximately half of New Zealand has no cell phone coverage due to geography which leads to isolation and inability to connect in this ever-increasing digital world – and this is not good enough.

“Rural New Zealand deserves high quality technology given the economy’s reliance on primary industries and tourism based in rural areas.

“New Zealand cannot afford for anyone to be left behind in the digital age.

“This lack of consideration of the impact on rural New Zealand is why it is so important for businesses and the Government to rural proof their decisions,” says Ms Dean.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact National Office. 

 

National Office 

Rural Women New Zealand
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

Thursday, 8 March marked this year's International Women's Day. As this year also celebrates 125 years since women in New Zealand won the the right to vote, the day was marked with significance.

Wednesday, 7 March was the launch of the Suffrage125 celebrations which was held at Government House and was attended by RWNZ Board Chair, Penny Mudford, Chief Executive Officer, Penelope England and Office Manager, Felicity Bunny. The launch was hosted by the Governor General, and RWNZ Patron Dame Patsy Reddy. The event was MC'd by journalist, Mihingarangi Forbes, and guest speakers included Minister for Women, Hon Julie Anne Genter and 2017 Young New Zealander of the Year, Rez Gardi.

The following day, Thursday, 8 March marked International Women's Day celebrations. RWNZ attended a breakfast at Parliament hosted by Zonta Wellington and the UN Women. RWNZ Chief Executive Officer Penelope England, and Communications, Marketing & Events Assistant, Catherine Stabb both attended the event.

Discussion topics at the event included recognition of the milestones made by women in New Zealand and the challenges that we still face. Rt Hon Helen Clark spoke of her successes, the obstacles she has faced and the how her rural background contributed to her personal strength, saying "rural people have to be very resilient".

Watch Rt Hon Helen Clark's Q&A with National Council of Women CEO Dr Gill Greer at the breakfast through the link here.

 

(Pictured below: Executive Officer Women’s Institute - Colleen Dryden, National Board Chair - Penny Mudford ONZM, National President Women’s Institute – Kay Hart, RWNZ Chief Executive Officer – Penelope England at the Suffrage125 launch at Government House.)

 


 

 

International Womens Day & Suffrage125

Friday, March 23, 2018

Thursday, 8 March marked this year's International Women's Day. As this year also celebrates 125 years since women in New Zealand won the the right to vote, the day was marked with significance.  Read More

(Pictured: RWNZ Board Member and Health convenor, Margaret Pittaway)

 Rural Women New Zealand are concerned with New Zealand's midwifery shortage, particularly for rural women. Please read our media release below in response to the current media regarding this issue. Board Member and Health convenor, Margaret Pittaway, has been working hard to ensure our concerns for this issue are heard. 

You can find the relevant media here.

 

 

125 YEARS SINCE THE VOTE AND RURAL WOMEN STILL STRUGGLE

It’s ironic that in the 125th year of suffrage, New Zealand women are struggling to gain and retain health services, says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“New Zealand is still hailed as a world leader because New Zealand women won their right to vote in 1893, the first nation in the world, however, we are behind in maternity care,” says Board Member and Health convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“RWNZ has been observing the developing dilemma for midwives and those they care for, with increasing concern.

“Rural midwives are simply not receiving a living wage due to the expectation they travel many more miles to visit patients than their urban counterparts.

“RWNZ holds grave fears for the wellbeing and safety of rural mums-to-be – decisions on maternal care are putting the mother’s life and the life and intellect of new born babies at risk.

“On top of this, is the insidious progression in the closure of small community hospitals and maternity units in the belief that centralisation of essential services is the best method.

“RWNZ firmly believes that not only is it vital to retain community hospitals for the wellbeing of our new mothers and families, but is vital for the sustainability of rural communities.

“The Government needs to empower rural communities by urgently addressing the crisis in rural health services, particularly resignations as midwives seek better and more attractive opportunities,” says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

 

 

125 Years Since the Vote and Rural Women Still Struggle

Thursday, March 22, 2018

(Pictured: RWNZ Board Member and Health convenor, Margaret Pittaway)  Read More

The 5th New Zealand Future Farms Conference was held on Tuesday, 12 – Wednesday, 13 March last week in Palmerston North. The event focused on the direction of farming in New Zealand with insights on the Digital Farmer; developing and diversifying on farm practice; farming’s role in high value food; farm health and strategy, and navigating change.

Board Member, Janet Williams presented on the Future of Farming – Navigating Change and Developing Strategy, focusing on developing rural communities to support the future farmer.

Janet talked about needing a significant increase of skilled people to double the exports by 2025, and emphasised the need to work smarter as primary industries uses 50% of New Zealand land and there is no more room for expansion.

Her examples of strengthening rural communities included Farmlands giving free rugby tickets for a Friday afternoon in Te Kuiti where majority of the small towns population had come to watch.

The game between the Blues and Chiefs was enjoyed by all and the Farmlands Rural Legends Shield was taken home by the Blues (Te Kuiti is the home town of the late Sir Colin Meads). Another example she gave was a local rural school, that planned their swimming sports where unfortunately a plumbing fault led to the pool having no water. Te Awamutu Fonterra filled their tankers with town supply water that they paid for to fill the school pool so the swimming sports could go ahead, and was an enjoyable family day.

She spoke of members who helped after the Kaikoura earthquake, and the Aftersocks campaign which sought to help those who had been affected by the repercussions of the earthquake and contributed to a fund for future adverse events relief. She encouraged people to purchase Aftersocks through the website and at the Central District Fieldays.

RWNZ has provided support (through donations and Aftersocks sales) to people in the Kaikoura area following the 2016 earthquake and those affected by the flooding in Edgecumbe, South Auckland and the Waikato.

Janet emphasised the importance of children being the involved in rural community events and activities such as the Rural Games which were held in Palmerston North prior to Future Farms, with a section – ‘KidsnCountry’. With competitive events such as rolling bales of hay, sack races and tree climbing, all children were able to have fun.

She spoke of St Pauls Collegiate School in Hamilton who are teaching years 12 and 13 Agribusiness, and the rural industries and businesses who are supporting these classes. December last year saw this course was accredited as a NZQA subject. Last year there were 37 agribusiness students in year 13, and around 30 went into tertiary agribusiness study. This year saw 93 students at St Pauls College in years 12 and 13 taking Agribusiness; they are part of the 500 students in 35 schools across New Zealand studying the subject. It is expected that 1500 students will study Agribusiness in 2019, these students are the future of the rural sector where they will bring modern approaches, become leaders, and market our value through adding export products.

Janet talked of boarding allowances, bursaries and sponsorship available to those from rural communities and/or wishing to pursue tertiary study in Agriculture or similar fields, including 16 of these from RWNZ. She gave light to alternate study or apprenticeship options for school leavers and those perhaps wanting a career change or gain new skills. Reliable and accessible internet is crucial for talented young people to collect the data necessary for precise farming decisions.

She concluded with emphasising the importance of education and technology, along with having resilient strong vibrant rural people to ensure the farming future can grow from strength to strength.

Dame Margaret Millard was at the conference, and her presence was widely appreciated by other delegates. The conference also provided great networking opportunities.

Although smaller than last years, the Future Farms Conference was more interactive, particularly when Minister for Agriculture and Rural Communities, Hon Damien O’Connor dropped by. It was great to see him take a seat on stage and join in on a panel discussion.

 

Future Farms Conference 2018

Wednesday, March 21, 2018

 Read More

(Pictured: Sticksn'Stones Chairperson Ashleigh Smith with RWNZ National President, Fiona Gower in the UN General Assembly at the CSW62 Opening on Monday). 

 The opening of the 62nd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW62) was held on Monday, 12 March 2018 at the United Nations in New York. The Commission's priority theme for this year is 'Challenges and opportunities in achieving gender equality and the empowerment of rural women and girls'. The work of the Commission is to review the progress made by governments to improve the lives of women and girls in rural areas.

CSW62 is being held in the UN General Assembly and 175 member and observer states are represented. Along with the member states there are 10,000 delegates from 400 Non-Government Organisations (NGO) attending numerous events as part of the CSW62's activities.

The day commenced with the session being opened by the CSW Chair Ambassador Geraldine Byrne Nason from Ireland. She is also Ireland's Permanent Representative at the UN. Her address was followed by the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, and the President of the UN General Assembly Miroslav Lajcak. Other speakers included the Chair of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), a Representative of the Youth, and a Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences.

National Chair, Penny Mudford also attended the opening in her role as Civil Society Representative on the New Zealand Government delegation. Both Fiona and Penny attended the opening inside the General Assembly where only government delegations and selected NGO delegates are eligible to attend. It was a great privilege that RWNZ was represented in person at the opening of CSW62.

CSW62 runs until Friday, 23 March 2018 where it is expected to culminate in an Outcome Document which will capture the agreed outcomes in relation to rural women and girls for governments to implement resulting from the work done at this session of the Commission.

New Zealand also held a side event led by Dr Jackie Blue, NZ Human Rights Commission responsible for Womens Rights. The panel comprised Minister for Women Hon Julie Anne Genter, Renee Graham (Ministry for Women Chief Executive), Fiona Gower, Jo Finer (Fonterra), plus representatives from Argentina and Australia. The panel spoke on the topic of Case Studies of Economic Empowerment of Rural Women in New Zealand, Australia, and Argentina. The session was full with over 100 delegates from all around the world attending the panel session. There was keen interest in our message.

National Chair, Penny Mudford. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CSW62 Well Underway

Thursday, March 15, 2018

(Pictured: Sticksn'Stones Chairperson Ashleigh Smith with RWNZ National President, Fiona Gower in the UN General Assembly at the CSW62 Opening on Monday).   Read More

Read All NewsRecent news

(Pictured: Sticksn'Stones Chairperson Ashleigh Smith with RWNZ National President, Fiona Gower in the UN General Assembly at the CSW62 Opening on Monday). 

 The opening of the 62nd Session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW62) was held on Monday, 12 March 2018 at the United Nations in New York. The Commission's priority theme for this year is 'Challenges and opportunities in achieving gender equality and the empowerment of rural women and girls'. The work of the Commission is to review the progress made by governments to improve the lives of women and girls in rural areas.

CSW62 is being held in the UN General Assembly and 175 member and observer states are represented. Along with the member states there are 10,000 delegates from 400 Non-Government Organisations (NGO) attending numerous events as part of the CSW62's activities.

The day commenced with the session being opened by the CSW Chair Ambassador Geraldine Byrne Nason from Ireland. She is also Ireland's Permanent Representative at the UN. Her address was followed by the UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, and the President of the UN General Assembly Miroslav Lajcak. Other speakers included the Chair of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), a Representative of the Youth, and a Special Rapporteur on violence against women, its causes and consequences.

National Chair, Penny Mudford also attended the opening in her role as Civil Society Representative on the New Zealand Government delegation. Both Fiona and Penny attended the opening inside the General Assembly where only government delegations and selected NGO delegates are eligible to attend. It was a great privilege that RWNZ was represented in person at the opening of CSW62.

CSW62 runs until Friday, 23 March 2018 where it is expected to culminate in an Outcome Document which will capture the agreed outcomes in relation to rural women and girls for governments to implement resulting from the work done at this session of the Commission.

New Zealand also held a side event led by Dr Jackie Blue, NZ Human Rights Commission responsible for Womens Rights. The panel comprised Minister for Women Hon Julie Anne Genter, Renee Graham (Ministry for Women Chief Executive), Fiona Gower, Jo Finer (Fonterra), plus representatives from Argentina and Australia. The panel spoke on the topic of Case Studies of Economic Empowerment of Rural Women in New Zealand, Australia, and Argentina. The session was full with over 100 delegates from all around the world attending the panel session. There was keen interest in our message.

National Chair, Penny Mudford. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CSW62 Well Underway

Thursday, March 15, 2018

(Pictured: Sticksn'Stones Chairperson Ashleigh Smith with RWNZ National President, Fiona Gower in the UN General Assembly at the CSW62 Opening on Monday).   Read More

Thursday, 8 March marked this year's International Women's Day. As this year also celebrates 125 years since women in New Zealand won the the right to vote, the day was marked with significance.

Wednesday, 7 March was the launch of the Suffrage125 celebrations which was held at Government House and was attended by RWNZ Board Chair, Penny Mudford, Chief Executive Officer, Penelope England and Office Manager, Felicity Bunny. The launch was hosted by the Governor General, and RWNZ Patron Dame Patsy Reddy. The event was MC'd by journalist, Mihingarangi Forbes, and guest speakers included Minister for Women, Hon Julie Anne Genter and 2017 Young New Zealander of the Year, Rez Gardi.

The following day, Thursday, 8 March marked International Women's Day celebrations. RWNZ attended a breakfast at Parliament hosted by Zonta Wellington and the UN Women. RWNZ Chief Executive Officer Penelope England, and Communications, Marketing & Events Assistant, Catherine Stabb both attended the event.

Discussion topics at the event included recognition of the milestones made by women in New Zealand and the challenges that we still face. Rt Hon Helen Clark spoke of her successes, the obstacles she has faced and the how her rural background contributed to her personal strength, saying "rural people have to be very resilient".

Watch Rt Hon Helen Clark's Q&A with National Council of Women CEO Dr Gill Greer at the breakfast through the link here.

 

(Pictured below: Executive Officer Women’s Institute - Colleen Dryden, National Board Chair - Penny Mudford ONZM, National President Women’s Institute – Kay Hart, RWNZ Chief Executive Officer – Penelope England at the Suffrage125 launch at Government House.)

 


 

 

International Womens Day & Suffrage125

Friday, March 23, 2018

Thursday, 8 March marked this year's International Women's Day. As this year also celebrates 125 years since women in New Zealand won the the right to vote, the day was marked with significance.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has released a media release today following RWNZ's oral submission on the Trusts Bill. 

 

Please read the media release below. 

 

RURAL WOMEN NEED TO BE INVOLVED IN DECISION MAKING

 

 

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) influenced positive change for rural families and communities recently, through their oral submission to Parliament on the Trusts Bill.

“RWNZ submitted that both a rural impact and gender impact analysis be conducted on the legislation and intersectionality so that the Bill does not discriminate against women in any way,” says RWNZ National Chair, Penny Mudford.

“RWNZ research indicates that women can be shut out of a share of the family farm through old trusts that fail to acknowledge them in the family as beneficiaries.

“This can lead to women being discriminated against in the dissolution of a relationship where a trust is used to exclude them from a share in the family farm or farm business.

"These situations should not be happening in 2018 and we urge the government to uphold the international instruments and outcome statements when updating legislation such as with the Trusts Bill currently before the Justice Select Committee.

"In particular, the agreed conclusions that came out of the United Nations 62nd session of the Commission on the Status of Women, which were held in New York in March 2018, make it abundantly clear that government's policies and legislation should not disproportionately disadvantage women and girls living in the rural sector.

"Since trusts are a common type of farm ownership structure in New Zealand we need to be sure they are not being used to disadvantage those who would otherwise be entitled to a share of the farm asset through relationship property or inheritance if the asset was not held in trust," says Ms Mudford.

Ends

 

If you wish to read our oral submission, you can find it here

 


 

Rural women need to be involved in decision making.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has released a media release today following RWNZ's oral submission on the Trusts Bill.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand have released a media release raising our concerns for how data is being collected in this year's census.

Please read the media release below.

CENSUS DATA COLLECTION INTEGRITY QUESTIONED

This year’s census is in danger of not providing the data needed to make good decisions, says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“Whilst we understand and support the excitement of capturing our census data online, our concern is that many people still do not have access to internet while others might not have the capability or capacity to do so,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“The timing of the delivery of access code letters, which indicate that New Zealanders can opt for paper forms presents challenges for our rural communities, given that delivery of mail is taking longer and might only be delivered three days a week.

“The chances of a rural household without internet or with unreliable internet, receiving census paper forms in time for Tuesday, 6 March is slim, and that is concerning.

“RWNZ is doing everything possible to ensure our networks are aware of the new way of doing the Census although surely more thought should have gone in to how the valuable information about the lives and status of New Zealanders would be collected.

“Maybe this year, there could have been a concerted effort to use both electronic collection and paper collection to ensure integrity of the data,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

 

Please contact the National Office for more information.

 

 

National Office

Rural Women New Zealand

 

[email protected]

04 473 5524


 

 

(image source: www.census.govt.nz)

Census Data Collection Integrity Questioned

Monday, February 26, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand have released a media release raising our concerns for how data is being collected in this year's census.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to hear of the death of a nine-year-old boy whilst riding a quad bike in rural Waikato last night and our thoughts are extended to friends and family.

 

“It is very sad, but it need not have occurred. We need to prevent families and friends from the heartbreak of losing a loved one in such tragic circumstances,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

 

“RWNZ are concerned on two levels, one is children riding age appropriate quad bikes unsupervised and the other is children under the age of 16 riding adult-sized quad bikes.

 

“Last nights’ incident is an unfortunate but timely reminder of manufacturers recommendations that children under the age of 16 should not be riding adult-sized quad bikes.

 

“Children do not have the weight, strength or judgement to be operating these vehicles.

 

“Or if young children are riding age appropriate quad bikes, they need to be wearing a helmet and be supervised at all times.

 

“RWNZ encourage that anyone planning to use any form of machinery on farms receive training, and learn safe practices.

 

“It is heart breaking to receive news like this,” says Ms. Gower.

 

To find the media to which we have responded, follow the link here

 

 

 

Please contact us for further information

[email protected]


 

(photo source: www.nzherald.co.nz)

 

Another Preventable Rural Tragedy

Thursday, February 01, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to hear of the death of a nine-year-old boy whilst riding a quad bike in rural Waikato last night and our thoughts are extended to friends and family. Read More