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RECENT NEWS

Congratulations to the Rural Women members who have won council and DHB seats in the 2013 local body elections.  Preliminary results show at least 14 members will be serving their communities for the next three years.

Rural Women National President, Liz Evans, says, "We congratulate these members who have stepped up to ensure that the rural voice is heard. There needs to be strong rural representation on councils, particularly those councils that act as unitary authorities.  Services supplied and rating are very different for rural and urban people.”

Many provincial local authority areas have lost their ward voting opportunities, which can make it much harder for the more isolated farming areas to be represented on urban-based councils.  We see this even in the provinces, which rely for their prosperity on their primary producer ratepayers.

“I am sure these successful candidates will help to raise awareness of rural issues and promote better understanding and fairer outcomes for everyone.”

Several Rural Women members also stood successfully for District Health Board positions. 

With rural health outcomes being affected by distance and access to services, it's so important that people who have a real understanding of the issues are able to advocate for rural communities when funding priorities are set and service decisions are made.


The successful candidates are:

Theresa Stark - Waikato Regional Council

Mary Gamble - Southern District Health Board 

Geoff Evans - Marlborough District Council - Wairau Awatere Ward - Associate Rural Women member

Fiona Gower - Onewhero/Tuakau Community Board

Hilary McNab - Catlins Ward, Clutha District Council - returned unopposed

Sharyn Price - Corriedale Ward, Waitaki District Council

Joan Wilson - Strath-Taieri Community Board - returned unopposed

Kate Wilson - Mosgiel/Taieri Ward, Dunedin City Council 

Ainsley Webb - Central Otago Health Inc board community representative - returned unopposed

Jacqui Church - Awaroa ki Tuakau Ward, Waikato District Council 

Ruth Rainey - Rangitikei District Council

Carolyn McLellan QSO - Golden Bay community board

Rosemarie Costar - Onewhero-Te Akau ward, Waikato District Council

Louise Cloot, MNZM - Otago Regional Council - re-elected for her 9th term 







Local Body Elections 2013 - Rural Women get results! 15-Oct-2013

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Congratulations to the Rural Women members who have won council and DHB seats in the 2013 local body elections.  Preliminary results show at least 14 members will be serving their communities for the next three years. Read More

Sue Wilson is a member of our St Arnaud branch.  She is standing in the Lakes-Murchison ward of the Tasman District Council.

What do you see as the most important qualities for a local councillor?

The qualities I see are about keeping the community in touch so people feel engaged in decision making, rather than only a few that might be involved in the community councils about the district.  I have lived in the area for some five years and met my councillor for the first time at one of the 'meet the candidates' meetings last week.  I intend to keep up my Facebook and Twitter accounts to keep my widespread community involved in open dialogue with what is happening on a micro level, rather than reading announcements in the newspaper.

What are the top three rural issues facing your community?

1.  Tasman District Council justifies its debt as inter-generational equity, synonymous with sustainable development.  However this can only be sustainable if future generations aren't lumbered with a large debt that impedes their ability to service the debt and be able to move forward with any future infrastructure they require.  The proposed Lee Valley Dam has the ability to cause inter-generational debt unless we look at alternative funding models to assist with sharing the load such as public private partnerships.

2.  Growing GE or GMO crops in our district needs to be done through the resource consent process and be publicly notified activity, making GE crop growers pay a sizeable bond so that should there be an outbreak our farmers are adequately protected, otherwise without these protections we will all pay.

3.  TDC's Long Term Plan is about having positive, healthy sustainable outcomes for our community.  The community drives decision making by Council, so I support a collaborative approach in attaining these sustainable outcomes to provide a balanced vision of sustainability in moving the community forward, so we need to be proactive rather than being in damage control with regards to future weather events.  A lot of work has been done on our renowned Waimea Estuary, so allowing sewage overflows or eutrophication from rivers and streams after heavy rain is no longer an option. To keep Richmond's predicted growth sustainable and to protect valuable arable land for food production means Richmond needs quality high density housing to prevent urban sprawl impinging on productive land.

If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

To advocate Council sticks to its sustainable outcomes advocated in the LTP and champion sustainability for all future decisions made so we aren't paying the price for bad decision making going forward. Intensive farming is justified as the way forward for food security on our fertile Waimea Plains, however not all intensive farming practices are for food crops, so when promoting the dam as necessary for food security the community needs to decide if sustainable intensive farming can be a reality in our region.




Theresa Stark received resounding support from voters who have re-elected her to the Waikato Regional Council for the Waikato general constituency under the 'Rates Control Team' banner. Preliminary results put her as the most preferred candidate by several hundred votes.

What inspired you to put your hand up for local body politics? 
Frustration in dealing with local councils for core services, unaffordable rates increases, and my advocacy roles within Federated Farmers led me to put my hand up for local body politics.
Has being a Rural Women NZ member influenced your decision to stand?
Being a member of Rural Women NZ at the time also gave me a sense of empowerment as they are a strong and respected lobbying voice and are successfully influencing policy.  In general, women from the rural sector don't always realize how much power they do have until they start to exercise it.  Rural women need to support each other taking up the challenges of 'putting oneself out there' as it can be daunting.
What do you see as the most important qualities for a local councillor?
The most important qualities are integrity and representation.  These are crucial.  Integrity, in that you must keep your word and be honest about what your thinking is - no game playing.  I made a pledge to the community through the Rates Control Team that I would aim to keep any rates rises at or below inflation, any more than that is unaffordable as incomes cannot keep pace.  Representation - once on council, councillors are informed that through the oath they take, they must act for the overall good of the region, rather than the constituency that elected them.  I firmly believe that it is for the good of the overall region to represent the view of the people who elected you to represent them.  
What are the top three rural issues facing your community?
The top three rural issues are water, affordability and local government reforms.  We all want clean water and enough of it for drinking, recreation, our businesses etc.  It is the essence of life.  The delicate balance will be in cleaning up lakes and rivers affordably, making sure everyone has enough water for their needs, and developing water storage policies to allay the effects of the terrible droughts the Waikato has suffered.  Local government reforms are in the wind.  It is crucial communities have their say in how they want to be governed. Talk of amalgamations are in the wind, but local views must remain in local government.
If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your term in office, what would it be?
I would like to see our council undergo a culture change to an ethos of true public service.  That is our reason for being, but all too often, bureaucracy overtakes common sense.  There is a lot of stress in the rural community derived from council policies and how they are implemented.  I want to see a 'how can I help you?' attitude, not a 'Rule 2.4b states you can't do that' attitude.











First time candidate and Onewhero Rural Women member, Jacqui Church, has romped home with the highest number of votes in the Awaroa ki Tuakau Ward of Waikato District Council, according to preliminary results.  The ward spans a large rural area from south of Auckland right to the Waikato river.

What inspired you to put your hand up for local body politics?

Being honoured with the Franklin's Finest Person Award for 2012 has set me on this path.  I am putting my money where my mouth is for a better way!  We need a vigorous, much more consultative and inclusive culture and voice at council than we current have on the Waikato District Council.

Has being a Rural Women member influenced your decision to stand?

Yes!  I realise how precious our rural lifestyle and values are and how very cool the rural women are I have had the privilege to meet since moving to the country from Auckland over 15 years ago.  This very powerful thought gave me the strength to 'put myself out here', to hopefully add value in the long term to our community.  Rural Women gives me strength of purpose and I feel supported!

What do you see as the most important qualities for a local councillor?

My reputation is based on a philosophy of being counted upon when the going gets tough; loyalty, honesty and integrity; supporting positive change and growth; and a no-nonsense, common sense and business-like approach, while always on the look out for some fun!

What are the top three issues facing your district ward?

1.  Reverse sensitivity issues that are rapidly increasing with the rapid growth throughout the ward.  Horticulture is growing in the ward as current quality land use is changing over to housing and infrastructure needs.  We seriously need some overall strategic planning, not the past usual haphazard ad-hoc planning decisions that have occurred.

2.  As a mixed ward split approximately half and half rural and town, there is a generally held feeling of dis-enfranchisement with local government, its policies and the ever-increasing rates being charged throughout the area.

3.  Managing the growth and getting our heads around understanding that we are on the ever-growing Auckland border.  We need to get on board with the Auckland Unitary Plan and ensure there are cohensive and logical plans in Waikato that maximise our 'riding the growth wave' while sustaining and protecting our past heritage, environment and farming and rural lifestyles.

If you could change one thing affecting your rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

I would like to see an appreciable increase in the amount of people excited and engaged again in our ward. That this silent majority is heard and considered properly in the consultation process, whereby the present culture of 'ticking the box' of consultation is actively taken seriously and the will of the many in our democracy actually works again.  Have we women and particularly our younger women forgotten how we fought and won the vote?  How we were the first women in the world to vote?  This is such a precious gift of our own to honour.  I believe the many make for a better, well-rounded society and future.

Ainsley Webb will be serving another term as the community representative on the Central Otago Health Inc Board, as she was unopposed in the recent elections.  Ainsley is the current Chair of Central Otago Health Inc and is a member of Cromwell Rural Women.

What does Otago Health Inc do?

Central Otago Health Inc provides a link between the Dunstan Hospital and the regions in the Central Otago community. Central Otago Health Inc is the sole shareholder of Central Otago Health Services Ltd, which operates Dunstan Hospital. So this role is at the governance level for Dunstan Hospital in Clyde.

What inspired you to stand for the board?

I first stood in 2004.  As I have a background in health and have lived in the area now for over 40 years, I thought I could be an informed voice for rural people and the Cromwell community.

Has being a Rural Women member influenced your decision to stand?

Having been a member of Rural Women NZ for almost 40 years, this gives me a broad base of opinions from the rural sector, as well as a network of contacts for gauging future needs.

What do you see as the most important qualities for this role?

The ability to listen to the community, to listen to the needs from within the hospital and allied health departments, to research and understand all information presented and to make decisions in the best interests of the health needs of the community.

What are the top three issues facing your rural community in terms of health?

The main issues facing both Central Otago Health Inc (which owns all the shares in Central Otago Health Services Ltd) and Central Otago Health Services Ltd (which manages the running of Dunstan Hospital) are:

1.  Distance from the main centre - isolation

2.  Inequitable funding for rural areas

3.  The inability of some urban-based administrators to understand the differing issues facing the rural sector.

What achievement are you most proud of, having served three terms in office?

The most proud achievements have been in my last term of office, when we were able to purchase and install a CT scanner, funded totally by the community.  It was officially opened on 10 August 2013 by Sir Eion Edgar, as part of the 150 year celebrations of continuous health service at Dunstan Hospital, that I was Chairman of.

If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your next term in office, what would it be?

I would like to see more available funding to help keep rural people in their own homes, particularly at week-ends, whyile the need nursing care, e.g. more District Nurse funding, more Palliative Care funding and acknowledgement of real travel costs (for care workers).


Congratulations to Kate Wilson, who was successful in being re-elected to the Mosgiel/Taieri ward of the Dunedin City Council in the 2013 elections. Kate is a member of Middlemarch Rural Women.

Kate, what inspired you to put your hand up for local body politics?

I believe it is very important that all voices are represented around a Council table, and as a rural woman, albeit one who was brought up in the centre of the city, and now living on the far outreaches, I think I bring an interesting blend of views and experience.

What do you see as the most important qualities for a local councillor?

An ability to listen, an ability to consider social, cultural and environmental issues alongside financial and economic considerations.  Being from a strong rural community and seeing how community can do more for less, and employing locals first informs me well for challenging other entrenched models of doing things in a city.

What are the top three rural issues facing your community?

1.  Employment

2.  Rates issues related to property values, rather than provision of services, and low targetted rate use

3.  Certainty of water management issues in the next 10 years.

If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your term in office, what would it be.

A vastly improved District Plan.

Joan Wilson has been on the Strath Taieri Community Board for the last 12 years, nine of those as Deputy-Chiar.  She will be representing the Strath Taieri community again after the September local body elections, as there are six nominations for the six places on the Board. Joan is a member of Middlemarch Rural Women.

Has being a Rural Women NZ member influenced your decision to serve on the board?

Yes, as an extension of my Rural Women membership.  I have been involved in voluntary organisations for many years, and the Community Board is just an extension of this.

What do you see as the most important qualities for a local body representative?

Honesty, integrity and ability to see the big picture.

What are the top three issues facing your community?

1. As one of the two rural boards within Dunedin City, we endeavour to put forward a rural voice, which may at times be a little different to the urban voice.  We are a small community, and fairly independent and just do things and get them done!

2. Medical services

3. Educational opportunities

If you could influence one thing affecting your rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

We are part of Dunedin city, though 80kms away, and we are entitled to a reasonable level of service.




Local Elections 2013 - Joan Wilson - Strath Taieri Community Board 04-Sep-2013

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Joan Wilson has been on the Strath Taieri Community Board for the last 12 years, nine of those as Deputy-Chiar.  She will be representing the Strath Taieri community again after the September local body elections, as there are six nominations for the six places on the Board. Joan is a member of Middlemarch Rural Women. Read More

Congratulations to Sharyn Price, who secured one of two seats in the Corriedale ward of the Waitaki District Council in the 2013 elections.  Sharyn is a Kauru Hill Rural Women NZ member.

What inspired you to put your hand up for local body politics?

A wise man once told me, "Service is the rent we pay for living".  Having been approached by several people whose opinions I value, I decided it was time to pay my dues.

Has being a Rural Women NZ member influenced your decision to stand?

Definitely!  I am inspired by the many strong, capable Rural Women NZ members already in office around the country.  Local members are very supportive and provide an excellent network for gathering community views - a great advantage for women candidates.

What do you see as the most important qualities for a local councillor?

My top picks are passion for the district - putting the community's interest first - and the ability to negotiate, especially where urban representatives outnumber rural voices around the table.  Being approachable and taking time to listen are also important, but councillors must weigh local opinions against detailed information not always widely available - a delicate balancing act.

What are the top three rural issues facing your community?

1. Rates fairness and value for money are utterly essential.  Rural ratepayers have seen much larger percentage increases in rates than Council's annual averges, thanks to farm development and increasing capital values, while town values fail to keep pace.  Paying ever more for a shrinking share of services is not reasonable.  Extracting maximum value on a limited budget is in everyone's interest.

2.  Maintaining quality infrastructure is a huge challenge for our geographically large, sparsely populated district.  High agricultural output and tourist traffic demand good roads, but national government contributions are dwindling.  Other infrastructure also needs attention to keep Waitaki a safe, attractive place to live and do business.

3.  Easy access to major services such as health care, education and access to government agencies is taken for granted in larger centres, but is easily lost from smaller districts like ours.  Call centres and internet access (for those who can get it) never replace the real thing.  It's essential to keep pressure on government to maintain local services and avoid becoming 'isolated' despite our central location.

If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

There is no good reason why we can't have a transparent rating policy that ensures each ward contributes the appropriate proportion to each budget item, regardless of changes in land/capital values over time.  Contributions to each item should reflect the ward's share of the benefit from spending, rather than fluctuating with movements in rateable value (especially where relative movements differ greatly between rural and urban properties). 

Independent Rural Women NZ member, Libby Jones, is standing for the Northland District Health Board director position.  She is currently an elected member of Northland DHB, since being elected in 2010.

What inspired you to put your hand up for local body politics?

In have spent a lot of the last 15 years since having children involved in the local rural community in a variety of organisations.  I have been on the local primary school board of trustees as chair for many years, and this has given me an interest in governance.  I have since joined the high school board.  My professional health social work background meant that my interest in local government is with people and health, so the district health board fitted well.

Has being a Rural Women NZ member influenced your decision to stand?

I am a relatively new Rural Women NZ member and am keen to support other rural women getting involved in local politics.  Being a rural woman certainly gives a keener understanding of community issues, and the ability to work out solutions that may not be obvious to others.

What do you see as the most important qualities for a DHB member?

Ability to listen to all points of view and to be confident to express your view even if it seems different to others.  Ask questions and have a perspective that looks at all the stakeholders, not just some.  Have integrity and be professional.  Have clarity around the purpose and role of governance, which is looking at the big picture, not the day to day management.

What are the top rural issues facing your DHB?

1. Community - unemployment. Lack of economic development. Economic sustainability of farming and difficulty for young people to get into farm ownership.

2. DHB - ageing population and associated costs of health care; increase in chronic illness - diabetes, heart disease; preventable illnesses in children and young people - respiratory disease, rheumatic fever, dental decay, teen suicide.

If you could change one thing affecting your rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

Increase the physical and emotional well-being of the region's young people.

What achievement are you most proud of during your first term in office?

The reduction in waiting times for surgery and specialist appointments and the increased focus on health promotion and illness prevention.

Local Elections 2013 - Libby Jones standing for Northland DHB 02-Sep-2013

Monday, September 02, 2013

Independent Rural Women NZ member, Libby Jones, is standing for the Northland District Health Board director position.  She is currently an elected member of Northland DHB, since being elected in 2010. Read More

Sue Matthews says she has a 'heart for health' and >is standing for the Bay of Plenty District Health Board, having served as a councillor for the Maketu Ward of the BOP District Council for the last six years.

Sue, what inspired you to put your hand up for election?

I was the first women to stand for the Maketu Ward and was warned that “it is all Federated Farmers out there” and “I wouldn’t have a chance”.  Someone forgot that women vote!!! I had worked at the Te Puke Maternity Annexe for 8 years and Plunket nurse for 10 – which in a small rural community meant that I had been involved in every family with a new baby for 18 years.


I have felt that I have made a positive contribution to the Western Bay of Plenty District Council in the past six years.  One of the ways is as Chair for the Community Partnerships Committee.  I changed the delivery of this committee from people coming into the chamber to present to us – we now go and engage with rural communities (especially those not represented by a community Board) and having our meetings in community halls and on Marae.


This is an exciting time to stand for the DHB – both Tauranga and Whakatane Hospitals have extensive building programmes. There is an increased focus on the role of Primary Health at a MOH level plus DHB and PHO level – which is exciting and necessary to improve the health outcomes for our communities.


What do you see as the most important qualities for a Board member?

Good governance and leadership skills.

Good connections with the communities and be approachable, listen and enable solutions to be achieved


Ability to read and research topics provided with the agenda to ensure  that the full picture is gained and the impacts of decisions are fully comprehended – including the social as well as budgetary implications.


Ability to interpret the budget and to ask the questions around prudent budgeting and identify areas for risk management early – enable a proactive approach.


Ensuring that the appropriate Key Performance Indicators are in the CEOs performance management to provide equitable, accessible, effective, high quality health care.


What are the top three issues affecting your DHB
  1. Strengthening integration between and within primary and secondary health services.  While continuing to manage and balance increasing expensive technology at one end of the health care spectrum to ensuring that there are resources to support health lifestyle choices that reduce the need for expensive health care in the future - can be generational change.
  2. Engaging vulnerable communities, e.g under 4 year olds, over 65s, youth and Maori, to ensure positive health outcomes are achieved across the whole Bay of Plenty, including those rurally isolated communities.  These communities have both strengths and challenges.
  3. Reducing ischemic heart disease rates, lung cancer, motor vehicle crashes and suicide, as these are the top four leading causes of avoidable mortality.  Reducing avoidable hospital admission rates for respiratory infections, dental caries, gastroenteritis and ears, nose and throat conditions.

If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

There are lots of models that are being trailed to improve the integration of health care and this will be extremely important in rural communities where adequate resources are often a challenge, eg rural health alliance in the Eastern Bay of Plenty is one model being trailed

Providing holistic health hubs within rural communities - Heartlands type approach where there is one admin for all the services – and includes social workers, budget advisors and competent nurses working with the nurse practitioner and health care assistants/ home based carers and where mental wellness is better understood and supported within rural communities.

I would like to see strategic leadership position established in the form of a Director of Primary and Community Health Care - appointed across the three Primary Health organisations to enable some traction to be gained to be able to lead integrated care to be delivered across the whole Bay of Plenty.

Local Elections 2013 - Sue Matthews stands for BOP DHB 31-Aug-2013

Saturday, August 31, 2013

Sue Matthews says she has a 'heart for health' and >is standing for the Bay of Plenty District Health Board, having served as a councillor for the Maketu Ward of the BOP District Council for the last six years. Read More

Read All NewsRecent news


 

RURAL WOMAN LEADER ELECTED CHAIR OF LANDCARE TRUST

 

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is delighted that National President Fiona Gower has been elected Chair of the New Zealand Landcare Trust.

RWNZ has been a trustee organisation since the Trust’s inception over twenty years ago and continues to support its work in promoting sustainable land and water quality locally through its Members.

“Fiona is well-suited for the role of Chair of NZ Landcare Trust – she has been RWNZ’s representative on the Trust since 2016, has a deep understanding of farming and is very passionate about sustainable land use and improving water quality,” says National Chair, Penny Mudford.

“RWNZ works to build and support rural leaders and to provide opportunities for leadership development and growth.

“Fiona's experience as RWNZ National President, Board Member, and a former co-ordinator of the rural environment portfolio provides a great foundation for her new role at NZ Landcare Trust.

“We are delighted that Fiona was elected as Chair of New Zealand Landcare Trust and we will continue to support her,” says Ms Mudford.

ENDS

For more information or to schedule an interview please contact Penny Mudford ONZM on 027 246 1936

 

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria. 

 

 

RURAL SCHOOL BUS SERVICE REVIEW NEEDED

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is calling for a review of the school bus eligibility criteria, particularly in the rural areas.

“The safest way for children to get to school in rural New Zealand is by bus, however, the current eligibility criteria for the service means that children are being put in dangerous situations,” says Education Portfolio Convenor and Board Member, Sue Higgins.

“If children live within two kilometres of a rural school they are not eligible for the local bus service where there is one, and are forced to walk or cycle on roads with no shoulders, often used by logging trucks, stock trucks and milk tankers, making it treacherous for our children.

“RWNZ understands that parents are responsible for ensuring their children go to school, however, the rural bus is vital for farming families who have both a busy working life and distance, for those who live further away, to contend with.

“A review of the criteria applied to children’s eligibility for their local rural school bus service is needed – school by school.

“It’s time the Government showed leadership on keeping our rural children safe on their journey to and from school,” says Mrs Higgins.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 

Rural school bus service review needed.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria.  Read More

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit. 

 

MEDIA RELEASE

16 August 2018
For immediate release

 

RURAL MATERNITY CARE IN CRISIS

The downgrading of maternity care in rural Otago and Southland will be catastrophic says Rural Women New Zealand(RWNZ).

“On top of the news that Lumsden’s birthing unit has been downgraded to a pre- and post-natal care unit, RWNZ understands that Wanaka has lost its bid to have a primary birthing unit and this does not bode well for rural communities,” says Board Member and Health Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Whilst RWNZ is somewhat pleased that Lumsden will retain care facilities for any woman with pre- and post-natal needs, women ready to give birth will need to travel at least 50 kilometres to the nearest delivery suite.

“Wanaka is expecting 200 births this coming year and there will be no primary birthing unit, and like Lumsden, will become a hub.

“The Otago-Southland region has a huge hinterland with many young parents who are choosing to have families and raise them in this wonderful part of the world and are at risk due to distance from the maternity care they are entitled to.

"No consideration has been given to those parents who have needed the services provided at Lumsden and already travelling up to two hours, now having an extra 50 kilometres added.

“When assessing maternity needs there is always two lives to consider, the mother and the child, and its outrageous that at the time in their lives when they should be close to their families they are not able to be, due to poor decision-making.

“It is not acceptable that pregnant women in rural areas of the South Island are now miles away from anywhere that can support them to have safe births, something a rural impact analysis would have highlighted.

“It’s time the Government and DHB ensured rural communities have the same access to maternity care as urban communities expect,” says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

For more information, please contact National Office.

[email protected]

04 473 5524

 

 

 

 

 

Rural maternity care in crisis

Thursday, August 16, 2018

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit.  Read More

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

New Zealand's farming women celebrating 125 years on

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

 

 

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards will be held on the evening of Tuesday, 20 November 2018 in Wellington in the Banquet Hall at Parliament.

A review of the Enterprising Rural Women Awards has been completed by the RWNZ Board with feedback from members and participants, external advice, and the awards partners.

The awards have been renamed the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards and NZI is the Premier Partner. The categories have been broadened, the application process has been updated and the judging criteria strengthened.

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards give an outstanding opportunity to showcase your business. The event attracts extensive media coverage and promotional opportunities. All winners will receive a membership of Rural Women New Zealand for one year. All category winners will each receive $1000 in prize money and a trophy, and the Supreme Winner will receive a further $1000 in prize money.

 

 

“Winning the Supreme Award was such an amazing result. I am proud of my achievements and honoured to be surrounded by such inspiring, talented and strong women,”

- Debra Cruickshank of Tannacrieff Wines, Supreme winner 2017.

 

The categories for the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards 2018 are:

  • Emerging business: Awarded to a business starting out in its journey and achieving exceptional results. Open to businesses that have been running from 2 – 5 years.
  • Love of the Land: Harnessing the potential of New Zealand’s land, environment or products of the land, to create a successful business enterprise.
  • Creative Arts: A business specialising in the creative arts working in a rural environment or using rural materials.
  • Innovation: An enterprise that challenges the status quo to bring something new and innovative to the market or utilising rural resources in an innovative way.
  • Rural Champion: A person or business who champions the rural sector or a rural enterprise – an outstanding contributor who goes above and beyond the normal in their support rural enterprise. Open to anybody.
 

A Supreme winner will be chosen from all category finalists, who has shown excellence and outstanding achievement across all entry criteria.

Please read the media release launching the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards here:

If you are interested in supporting the awards as a category partner, please contact [email protected].

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

Wednesday, October 03, 2018

  Read More