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RECENT NEWS

Congratulations to the Rural Women members who have won council and DHB seats in the 2013 local body elections.  Preliminary results show at least 14 members will be serving their communities for the next three years.

Rural Women National President, Liz Evans, says, "We congratulate these members who have stepped up to ensure that the rural voice is heard. There needs to be strong rural representation on councils, particularly those councils that act as unitary authorities.  Services supplied and rating are very different for rural and urban people.”

Many provincial local authority areas have lost their ward voting opportunities, which can make it much harder for the more isolated farming areas to be represented on urban-based councils.  We see this even in the provinces, which rely for their prosperity on their primary producer ratepayers.

“I am sure these successful candidates will help to raise awareness of rural issues and promote better understanding and fairer outcomes for everyone.”

Several Rural Women members also stood successfully for District Health Board positions. 

With rural health outcomes being affected by distance and access to services, it's so important that people who have a real understanding of the issues are able to advocate for rural communities when funding priorities are set and service decisions are made.


The successful candidates are:

Theresa Stark - Waikato Regional Council

Mary Gamble - Southern District Health Board 

Geoff Evans - Marlborough District Council - Wairau Awatere Ward - Associate Rural Women member

Fiona Gower - Onewhero/Tuakau Community Board

Hilary McNab - Catlins Ward, Clutha District Council - returned unopposed

Sharyn Price - Corriedale Ward, Waitaki District Council

Joan Wilson - Strath-Taieri Community Board - returned unopposed

Kate Wilson - Mosgiel/Taieri Ward, Dunedin City Council 

Ainsley Webb - Central Otago Health Inc board community representative - returned unopposed

Jacqui Church - Awaroa ki Tuakau Ward, Waikato District Council 

Ruth Rainey - Rangitikei District Council

Carolyn McLellan QSO - Golden Bay community board

Rosemarie Costar - Onewhero-Te Akau ward, Waikato District Council

Louise Cloot, MNZM - Otago Regional Council - re-elected for her 9th term 







Local Body Elections 2013 - Rural Women get results! 15-Oct-2013

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

Congratulations to the Rural Women members who have won council and DHB seats in the 2013 local body elections.  Preliminary results show at least 14 members will be serving their communities for the next three years. Read More

Sue Wilson is a member of our St Arnaud branch.  She is standing in the Lakes-Murchison ward of the Tasman District Council.

What do you see as the most important qualities for a local councillor?

The qualities I see are about keeping the community in touch so people feel engaged in decision making, rather than only a few that might be involved in the community councils about the district.  I have lived in the area for some five years and met my councillor for the first time at one of the 'meet the candidates' meetings last week.  I intend to keep up my Facebook and Twitter accounts to keep my widespread community involved in open dialogue with what is happening on a micro level, rather than reading announcements in the newspaper.

What are the top three rural issues facing your community?

1.  Tasman District Council justifies its debt as inter-generational equity, synonymous with sustainable development.  However this can only be sustainable if future generations aren't lumbered with a large debt that impedes their ability to service the debt and be able to move forward with any future infrastructure they require.  The proposed Lee Valley Dam has the ability to cause inter-generational debt unless we look at alternative funding models to assist with sharing the load such as public private partnerships.

2.  Growing GE or GMO crops in our district needs to be done through the resource consent process and be publicly notified activity, making GE crop growers pay a sizeable bond so that should there be an outbreak our farmers are adequately protected, otherwise without these protections we will all pay.

3.  TDC's Long Term Plan is about having positive, healthy sustainable outcomes for our community.  The community drives decision making by Council, so I support a collaborative approach in attaining these sustainable outcomes to provide a balanced vision of sustainability in moving the community forward, so we need to be proactive rather than being in damage control with regards to future weather events.  A lot of work has been done on our renowned Waimea Estuary, so allowing sewage overflows or eutrophication from rivers and streams after heavy rain is no longer an option. To keep Richmond's predicted growth sustainable and to protect valuable arable land for food production means Richmond needs quality high density housing to prevent urban sprawl impinging on productive land.

If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

To advocate Council sticks to its sustainable outcomes advocated in the LTP and champion sustainability for all future decisions made so we aren't paying the price for bad decision making going forward. Intensive farming is justified as the way forward for food security on our fertile Waimea Plains, however not all intensive farming practices are for food crops, so when promoting the dam as necessary for food security the community needs to decide if sustainable intensive farming can be a reality in our region.




Theresa Stark received resounding support from voters who have re-elected her to the Waikato Regional Council for the Waikato general constituency under the 'Rates Control Team' banner. Preliminary results put her as the most preferred candidate by several hundred votes.

What inspired you to put your hand up for local body politics? 
Frustration in dealing with local councils for core services, unaffordable rates increases, and my advocacy roles within Federated Farmers led me to put my hand up for local body politics.
Has being a Rural Women NZ member influenced your decision to stand?
Being a member of Rural Women NZ at the time also gave me a sense of empowerment as they are a strong and respected lobbying voice and are successfully influencing policy.  In general, women from the rural sector don't always realize how much power they do have until they start to exercise it.  Rural women need to support each other taking up the challenges of 'putting oneself out there' as it can be daunting.
What do you see as the most important qualities for a local councillor?
The most important qualities are integrity and representation.  These are crucial.  Integrity, in that you must keep your word and be honest about what your thinking is - no game playing.  I made a pledge to the community through the Rates Control Team that I would aim to keep any rates rises at or below inflation, any more than that is unaffordable as incomes cannot keep pace.  Representation - once on council, councillors are informed that through the oath they take, they must act for the overall good of the region, rather than the constituency that elected them.  I firmly believe that it is for the good of the overall region to represent the view of the people who elected you to represent them.  
What are the top three rural issues facing your community?
The top three rural issues are water, affordability and local government reforms.  We all want clean water and enough of it for drinking, recreation, our businesses etc.  It is the essence of life.  The delicate balance will be in cleaning up lakes and rivers affordably, making sure everyone has enough water for their needs, and developing water storage policies to allay the effects of the terrible droughts the Waikato has suffered.  Local government reforms are in the wind.  It is crucial communities have their say in how they want to be governed. Talk of amalgamations are in the wind, but local views must remain in local government.
If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your term in office, what would it be?
I would like to see our council undergo a culture change to an ethos of true public service.  That is our reason for being, but all too often, bureaucracy overtakes common sense.  There is a lot of stress in the rural community derived from council policies and how they are implemented.  I want to see a 'how can I help you?' attitude, not a 'Rule 2.4b states you can't do that' attitude.











First time candidate and Onewhero Rural Women member, Jacqui Church, has romped home with the highest number of votes in the Awaroa ki Tuakau Ward of Waikato District Council, according to preliminary results.  The ward spans a large rural area from south of Auckland right to the Waikato river.

What inspired you to put your hand up for local body politics?

Being honoured with the Franklin's Finest Person Award for 2012 has set me on this path.  I am putting my money where my mouth is for a better way!  We need a vigorous, much more consultative and inclusive culture and voice at council than we current have on the Waikato District Council.

Has being a Rural Women member influenced your decision to stand?

Yes!  I realise how precious our rural lifestyle and values are and how very cool the rural women are I have had the privilege to meet since moving to the country from Auckland over 15 years ago.  This very powerful thought gave me the strength to 'put myself out here', to hopefully add value in the long term to our community.  Rural Women gives me strength of purpose and I feel supported!

What do you see as the most important qualities for a local councillor?

My reputation is based on a philosophy of being counted upon when the going gets tough; loyalty, honesty and integrity; supporting positive change and growth; and a no-nonsense, common sense and business-like approach, while always on the look out for some fun!

What are the top three issues facing your district ward?

1.  Reverse sensitivity issues that are rapidly increasing with the rapid growth throughout the ward.  Horticulture is growing in the ward as current quality land use is changing over to housing and infrastructure needs.  We seriously need some overall strategic planning, not the past usual haphazard ad-hoc planning decisions that have occurred.

2.  As a mixed ward split approximately half and half rural and town, there is a generally held feeling of dis-enfranchisement with local government, its policies and the ever-increasing rates being charged throughout the area.

3.  Managing the growth and getting our heads around understanding that we are on the ever-growing Auckland border.  We need to get on board with the Auckland Unitary Plan and ensure there are cohensive and logical plans in Waikato that maximise our 'riding the growth wave' while sustaining and protecting our past heritage, environment and farming and rural lifestyles.

If you could change one thing affecting your rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

I would like to see an appreciable increase in the amount of people excited and engaged again in our ward. That this silent majority is heard and considered properly in the consultation process, whereby the present culture of 'ticking the box' of consultation is actively taken seriously and the will of the many in our democracy actually works again.  Have we women and particularly our younger women forgotten how we fought and won the vote?  How we were the first women in the world to vote?  This is such a precious gift of our own to honour.  I believe the many make for a better, well-rounded society and future.

Ainsley Webb will be serving another term as the community representative on the Central Otago Health Inc Board, as she was unopposed in the recent elections.  Ainsley is the current Chair of Central Otago Health Inc and is a member of Cromwell Rural Women.

What does Otago Health Inc do?

Central Otago Health Inc provides a link between the Dunstan Hospital and the regions in the Central Otago community. Central Otago Health Inc is the sole shareholder of Central Otago Health Services Ltd, which operates Dunstan Hospital. So this role is at the governance level for Dunstan Hospital in Clyde.

What inspired you to stand for the board?

I first stood in 2004.  As I have a background in health and have lived in the area now for over 40 years, I thought I could be an informed voice for rural people and the Cromwell community.

Has being a Rural Women member influenced your decision to stand?

Having been a member of Rural Women NZ for almost 40 years, this gives me a broad base of opinions from the rural sector, as well as a network of contacts for gauging future needs.

What do you see as the most important qualities for this role?

The ability to listen to the community, to listen to the needs from within the hospital and allied health departments, to research and understand all information presented and to make decisions in the best interests of the health needs of the community.

What are the top three issues facing your rural community in terms of health?

The main issues facing both Central Otago Health Inc (which owns all the shares in Central Otago Health Services Ltd) and Central Otago Health Services Ltd (which manages the running of Dunstan Hospital) are:

1.  Distance from the main centre - isolation

2.  Inequitable funding for rural areas

3.  The inability of some urban-based administrators to understand the differing issues facing the rural sector.

What achievement are you most proud of, having served three terms in office?

The most proud achievements have been in my last term of office, when we were able to purchase and install a CT scanner, funded totally by the community.  It was officially opened on 10 August 2013 by Sir Eion Edgar, as part of the 150 year celebrations of continuous health service at Dunstan Hospital, that I was Chairman of.

If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your next term in office, what would it be?

I would like to see more available funding to help keep rural people in their own homes, particularly at week-ends, whyile the need nursing care, e.g. more District Nurse funding, more Palliative Care funding and acknowledgement of real travel costs (for care workers).


Congratulations to Kate Wilson, who was successful in being re-elected to the Mosgiel/Taieri ward of the Dunedin City Council in the 2013 elections. Kate is a member of Middlemarch Rural Women.

Kate, what inspired you to put your hand up for local body politics?

I believe it is very important that all voices are represented around a Council table, and as a rural woman, albeit one who was brought up in the centre of the city, and now living on the far outreaches, I think I bring an interesting blend of views and experience.

What do you see as the most important qualities for a local councillor?

An ability to listen, an ability to consider social, cultural and environmental issues alongside financial and economic considerations.  Being from a strong rural community and seeing how community can do more for less, and employing locals first informs me well for challenging other entrenched models of doing things in a city.

What are the top three rural issues facing your community?

1.  Employment

2.  Rates issues related to property values, rather than provision of services, and low targetted rate use

3.  Certainty of water management issues in the next 10 years.

If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your term in office, what would it be.

A vastly improved District Plan.

Joan Wilson has been on the Strath Taieri Community Board for the last 12 years, nine of those as Deputy-Chiar.  She will be representing the Strath Taieri community again after the September local body elections, as there are six nominations for the six places on the Board. Joan is a member of Middlemarch Rural Women.

Has being a Rural Women NZ member influenced your decision to serve on the board?

Yes, as an extension of my Rural Women membership.  I have been involved in voluntary organisations for many years, and the Community Board is just an extension of this.

What do you see as the most important qualities for a local body representative?

Honesty, integrity and ability to see the big picture.

What are the top three issues facing your community?

1. As one of the two rural boards within Dunedin City, we endeavour to put forward a rural voice, which may at times be a little different to the urban voice.  We are a small community, and fairly independent and just do things and get them done!

2. Medical services

3. Educational opportunities

If you could influence one thing affecting your rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

We are part of Dunedin city, though 80kms away, and we are entitled to a reasonable level of service.




Local Elections 2013 - Joan Wilson - Strath Taieri Community Board 04-Sep-2013

Wednesday, September 04, 2013

Joan Wilson has been on the Strath Taieri Community Board for the last 12 years, nine of those as Deputy-Chiar.  She will be representing the Strath Taieri community again after the September local body elections, as there are six nominations for the six places on the Board. Joan is a member of Middlemarch Rural Women. Read More

Congratulations to Sharyn Price, who secured one of two seats in the Corriedale ward of the Waitaki District Council in the 2013 elections.  Sharyn is a Kauru Hill Rural Women NZ member.

What inspired you to put your hand up for local body politics?

A wise man once told me, "Service is the rent we pay for living".  Having been approached by several people whose opinions I value, I decided it was time to pay my dues.

Has being a Rural Women NZ member influenced your decision to stand?

Definitely!  I am inspired by the many strong, capable Rural Women NZ members already in office around the country.  Local members are very supportive and provide an excellent network for gathering community views - a great advantage for women candidates.

What do you see as the most important qualities for a local councillor?

My top picks are passion for the district - putting the community's interest first - and the ability to negotiate, especially where urban representatives outnumber rural voices around the table.  Being approachable and taking time to listen are also important, but councillors must weigh local opinions against detailed information not always widely available - a delicate balancing act.

What are the top three rural issues facing your community?

1. Rates fairness and value for money are utterly essential.  Rural ratepayers have seen much larger percentage increases in rates than Council's annual averges, thanks to farm development and increasing capital values, while town values fail to keep pace.  Paying ever more for a shrinking share of services is not reasonable.  Extracting maximum value on a limited budget is in everyone's interest.

2.  Maintaining quality infrastructure is a huge challenge for our geographically large, sparsely populated district.  High agricultural output and tourist traffic demand good roads, but national government contributions are dwindling.  Other infrastructure also needs attention to keep Waitaki a safe, attractive place to live and do business.

3.  Easy access to major services such as health care, education and access to government agencies is taken for granted in larger centres, but is easily lost from smaller districts like ours.  Call centres and internet access (for those who can get it) never replace the real thing.  It's essential to keep pressure on government to maintain local services and avoid becoming 'isolated' despite our central location.

If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

There is no good reason why we can't have a transparent rating policy that ensures each ward contributes the appropriate proportion to each budget item, regardless of changes in land/capital values over time.  Contributions to each item should reflect the ward's share of the benefit from spending, rather than fluctuating with movements in rateable value (especially where relative movements differ greatly between rural and urban properties). 

Independent Rural Women NZ member, Libby Jones, is standing for the Northland District Health Board director position.  She is currently an elected member of Northland DHB, since being elected in 2010.

What inspired you to put your hand up for local body politics?

In have spent a lot of the last 15 years since having children involved in the local rural community in a variety of organisations.  I have been on the local primary school board of trustees as chair for many years, and this has given me an interest in governance.  I have since joined the high school board.  My professional health social work background meant that my interest in local government is with people and health, so the district health board fitted well.

Has being a Rural Women NZ member influenced your decision to stand?

I am a relatively new Rural Women NZ member and am keen to support other rural women getting involved in local politics.  Being a rural woman certainly gives a keener understanding of community issues, and the ability to work out solutions that may not be obvious to others.

What do you see as the most important qualities for a DHB member?

Ability to listen to all points of view and to be confident to express your view even if it seems different to others.  Ask questions and have a perspective that looks at all the stakeholders, not just some.  Have integrity and be professional.  Have clarity around the purpose and role of governance, which is looking at the big picture, not the day to day management.

What are the top rural issues facing your DHB?

1. Community - unemployment. Lack of economic development. Economic sustainability of farming and difficulty for young people to get into farm ownership.

2. DHB - ageing population and associated costs of health care; increase in chronic illness - diabetes, heart disease; preventable illnesses in children and young people - respiratory disease, rheumatic fever, dental decay, teen suicide.

If you could change one thing affecting your rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

Increase the physical and emotional well-being of the region's young people.

What achievement are you most proud of during your first term in office?

The reduction in waiting times for surgery and specialist appointments and the increased focus on health promotion and illness prevention.

Local Elections 2013 - Libby Jones standing for Northland DHB 02-Sep-2013

Monday, September 02, 2013

Independent Rural Women NZ member, Libby Jones, is standing for the Northland District Health Board director position.  She is currently an elected member of Northland DHB, since being elected in 2010. Read More

Sue Matthews says she has a 'heart for health' and >is standing for the Bay of Plenty District Health Board, having served as a councillor for the Maketu Ward of the BOP District Council for the last six years.

Sue, what inspired you to put your hand up for election?

I was the first women to stand for the Maketu Ward and was warned that “it is all Federated Farmers out there” and “I wouldn’t have a chance”.  Someone forgot that women vote!!! I had worked at the Te Puke Maternity Annexe for 8 years and Plunket nurse for 10 – which in a small rural community meant that I had been involved in every family with a new baby for 18 years.


I have felt that I have made a positive contribution to the Western Bay of Plenty District Council in the past six years.  One of the ways is as Chair for the Community Partnerships Committee.  I changed the delivery of this committee from people coming into the chamber to present to us – we now go and engage with rural communities (especially those not represented by a community Board) and having our meetings in community halls and on Marae.


This is an exciting time to stand for the DHB – both Tauranga and Whakatane Hospitals have extensive building programmes. There is an increased focus on the role of Primary Health at a MOH level plus DHB and PHO level – which is exciting and necessary to improve the health outcomes for our communities.


What do you see as the most important qualities for a Board member?

Good governance and leadership skills.

Good connections with the communities and be approachable, listen and enable solutions to be achieved


Ability to read and research topics provided with the agenda to ensure  that the full picture is gained and the impacts of decisions are fully comprehended – including the social as well as budgetary implications.


Ability to interpret the budget and to ask the questions around prudent budgeting and identify areas for risk management early – enable a proactive approach.


Ensuring that the appropriate Key Performance Indicators are in the CEOs performance management to provide equitable, accessible, effective, high quality health care.


What are the top three issues affecting your DHB
  1. Strengthening integration between and within primary and secondary health services.  While continuing to manage and balance increasing expensive technology at one end of the health care spectrum to ensuring that there are resources to support health lifestyle choices that reduce the need for expensive health care in the future - can be generational change.
  2. Engaging vulnerable communities, e.g under 4 year olds, over 65s, youth and Maori, to ensure positive health outcomes are achieved across the whole Bay of Plenty, including those rurally isolated communities.  These communities have both strengths and challenges.
  3. Reducing ischemic heart disease rates, lung cancer, motor vehicle crashes and suicide, as these are the top four leading causes of avoidable mortality.  Reducing avoidable hospital admission rates for respiratory infections, dental caries, gastroenteritis and ears, nose and throat conditions.

If you could change one thing affecting the rural community during your term in office, what would it be?

There are lots of models that are being trailed to improve the integration of health care and this will be extremely important in rural communities where adequate resources are often a challenge, eg rural health alliance in the Eastern Bay of Plenty is one model being trailed

Providing holistic health hubs within rural communities - Heartlands type approach where there is one admin for all the services – and includes social workers, budget advisors and competent nurses working with the nurse practitioner and health care assistants/ home based carers and where mental wellness is better understood and supported within rural communities.

I would like to see strategic leadership position established in the form of a Director of Primary and Community Health Care - appointed across the three Primary Health organisations to enable some traction to be gained to be able to lead integrated care to be delivered across the whole Bay of Plenty.

Local Elections 2013 - Sue Matthews stands for BOP DHB 31-Aug-2013

Saturday, August 31, 2013

Sue Matthews says she has a 'heart for health' and >is standing for the Bay of Plenty District Health Board, having served as a councillor for the Maketu Ward of the BOP District Council for the last six years. Read More

Read All NewsRecent news

Congratulations to the National Competition Winners for 2017

Tarrant Bell & Tutaenui Bell Speech contest topic: “Why Not?”

Tutaenui Bell and Tarrant Bell

1st Place Alex Thompson, Amuri Dinner Branch, Region 2

2nd Place Leona Trimble, Hampden Branch, Region 1


Marlborough Short Story & Olive Burdekin short story “ What a Fuss”

1000-1500 words for Marlborough Short Story – Kerry France, Moa Flat Branch, Region 1 for “Guess what I am.” Dominion Essay Tray and voucher from Region 3

 

1500- 2000 words for Olive Burdekin – Chrissy Sumby, Kenepuru Branch, Region 3 for “Bay Swimming” Voucher from Region 3

 

Cora Wilding- insulated Pot Stand - any medium

Melva Robb – Marlborough Provincial, 1st Place, Region 3


Olive Craig Trophy Member of Excellence (Judged by the National Board) Sue Hall Region 6


Talbot Trophy- best Provincial, Branch or Group International Officer report

International Officer - Melva Robb – Marlborough Provincial, 1st Place, Region 3

 

The Honora O’Neill Gong is for the best Provincial, Sandra Curd, Mid Canterbury Region 2

 

Branch or Group President’s Report: Carolyn McLellan, Bainham Branch Region 3

The Lady Blundell Tray Competition

for the most innovative project completed by an individual, Group, Branch, Provincial or Region.

Winner: Amuri Dinner Group.


 

National Competition Winners 2017

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Congratulations to the National Competition Winners for 2017 Read More

Rural untracked parcels change

 

From 1 February, New Zealand Post customers will see the cost of sending untracked parcels to rural addresses increase by $3.70.

This charge, which was initially only placed on Tracked, Courier and Courier Signature parcels will now also be applied to untracked parcels sent to a rural address as a means to offset fixed costs associated with deliver to rural locations.

New Zealand Post has stated that these costs are a result of the continuing decrease in letter volumes.

 

Despite ongoing cost reductions made, this change is said to be necessary to continue to operate a sustainable network.

For business account customers, the change will take effect on 1 July 2018 as set out in their contacts.

 

 

Rural Post Prices to Change

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Rural untracked parcels change
 Read More

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events.

The Rural Support Trust advise farmers to ensure stock and domestic animals have food, water, and shelter where necessary, and are secure. Ensure that all stock injuries are promptly attended too, after human needs are met.

If your farm or rural property or stock has been affected by an adverse event and you need assistance, contact your local Rural Support Trust on 0800 787 254 (0800 RURAL HELP) with information on the impacts on your farm, or requests for help.

The Rural Women New Zealand Adverse Events and Relief Fund is available to individuals, communities and groups, with a particular emphasis on rural women and children. The fund provides financial assistance to persons or groups, where there is an identified urgent need due to recent adverse events such as drought, fires, floods or earthquakes.

Click here to read more about applying for the fund.

Contact details for support agencies:

The Rural Support Trust (RST organise community events and one-on-one mentoring, as well as targeted support services in emergency situations)  
http://www.rural-support.org.nz Ph: 0800 787 254.

DairyNZ: Sharemilkers support http://www.dairynz.co.nz/farm/tactics/support-for-sharemilkers/

Federated Farmers http://www.fedfarm.org.nz/ Ph: 0800 327 646 or drought feedline 0800 376 844.

Doug Avery’s Resilient Farmer http://www.resilientfarmer.co.nz/

Farmstrong http://www.farmstrong.co.nz


If you just want to talk, or know someone who is at risk, there are a range of support options available, including counselling services:

Lifeline: 0800 543 354 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling

Youthline: 0800 376 633 or free text 234 - Provides 24 hour telephone and text counselling services for young people

Samaritans: 0800 726 666 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling.

Women's Refuge: 0800 REFUGE (733 843) a 24/7 crisis and support line provide advice and information.

Shakti New Zealand 0800SHAKTI (0800 742 584) If you are in a situation of domestic violence call our 24-hour crisis line, and multi-lingual staff will provide information.

Tautoko: 0508 828 865 - provides support, information and resources to people at risk of suicide, and their family, whānau and friends.

What'sup: 0800 942 8787 (0800 What’s Up) is a counselling helpline for children and young people, aged 5-18. Phone Mon-Fri 1-10pm, Sat-Sun 3-10pm.

Kidsline: 0800 543 754, it is a 24/7 helpline for children and teens, run by specially trained youth volunteers.

Thelowdown.co.nz - Free Text 5626, watch videos or contact for support. 

depression.org.nz National Depression Initiative (for adults), 0800 111 757 - 24 hour service 

Ministry for Children Oranga Tamariki If you're worried about a child or family that you know, there are ways you can help, contact Child, Youth and Family.

For information about suicide prevention, see http://www.spinz.org.nz .

If it is an emergency, or you feel yourself, or someone you know is at risk, please call 111.

Rural community support services

Thursday, April 06, 2017

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events. Read More

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World.

It’s a great way to come together, catch up with friends and have some fun and healthy exercise along the way.

The date for the event is Sunday 29 April– ACWW Day - though walks can take place at other dates around that time if more convenient.

Here’s What You Do:

1.Decide on a walk for your group. It can range from a stroll around the park, a hike through the bush, an amble around a neighbourhood or along a walkway.
2.Invite others. This is a great way to reach out to new potential members, and include families and friends.
3.Go to the registration form , fill it in and email [email protected] or post to national office before your walk, so we know what walks are taking place and can promote them.
4.Fund raise through sponsorship, a gold coin donation, or perhaps an afternoon tea or sausage sizzle afterwards.
5.Tally up the number of people who attend and the distance walked.
6.Take photos and send to national office so we can publicise your walks and use on our website and Facebook pages. Email [email protected]
7.Send your funds raised, and details of kilometres walked to national office.

 

 


 

More About The Work Of ACWW

ACWW connects and supports women and communities worldwide by:

• Working in partnership with member societies to offer mutual support
• Connecting at international level through UN representation
• Funding community development projects
• Supporting agricultural initiatives
Find out more about ACWW here.

Women Walk the World 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World. Read More

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.

RWNZ was one of the founding members of ACWW. It is one of the largest international development organisations for rural women.

The ACWW network allows it to engage at the local, national, and international level with the aim of achieving these goals:

- To raise the standard of living for rural women and their families through education, training and community development programmes.

- To provide practical support to our members and help them set up income-generating schemes.

- To support educational opportunities for women and girls, and help eliminate gender discrimination.

- To give rural women a voice at an international level through our links with UN agencies and bodies.

Caption: Delegates from the South Pacific Area Conference in New Plymouth complete the ACWW Walk the World event in April 2017. 

Click here to download an information booklet about ACWW (8MB PDF)

Click here to go to the ACWW website

 

ACWW Study Topic 2017

Friday, June 16, 2017

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.  Read More

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents.

Mr Leggett says the honours are an opportunity to recognise members of the community who give outstanding service to others.

“The recipients use their skills and energy and give their time and talents to a myriad of organisations and causes. They are serving us all by contributing to the greater good and each deserves our grateful thanks,” he said.

Severe earthquakes hit on 14 November 2016 affecting rural people in North Canterbury, Kaikōura and South Marlborough. Melva and Glenda spearheaded delivery of relief supplies to remote rural families.They teamed up with the local Rural Support Trust and Federated Farmers, to contact as many residents as they could to assess what was needed other than food.

“Melva and Glenda’s personal compassion which comes with a loving dollop of practical help, alleviated the sense of isolation and trauma families were experiencing from the Clarence to South Marlborough and the Awatere Valley,” says RWNZ Marlborough member Barbara Stuart. “They took the crisis seriously and did everything in their power to help.”

Glenda and Melva appealed to RWNZ members and the wider community for donations of crockery and dinner sets. They prepared 100 gift baskets of baking, chocolates and soft toys for children and managed to get supplies onto transport that was headed to isolated areas. They even sent a gift basket via helicopter for a family with a new-born baby, who were isolated at the top of the Awatere Valley.

 

The other honours recipients this year are Ross Beech, a farmer-environmentalist and a member of the South Marlborough Landscape Restoration Trust; Jim Thomas, a Lions Club member with a record of service to sport and who has a key role in the local Victim Support service, and Henny Vervaart, a Rotary Club member, Red Cross meals-on-wheels volunteer and a valued part of the Alzheimers Marlborough organisation.

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Civic Award for Melva Robb and Glenda Robb

Monday, October 09, 2017

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents. Read More