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Rosemary The Sheep had triplets! “Hi, I'm Rosemary, on 28 July 2011 I had triplet lambs. My owners thought I was pretty clever! Farmer Anne's friends have named my lambs Sage, Thyme and Mint. You will be surprised to see how much they have grown!


Follow me on Facebook to see what my life is like on the farm in the hill country of the Tararua District in New Zealand.”

www.facebook.com/rosemarythesheep

Rosemary the Sheep is a new project designed to tell the story of what life is like in rural New Zealand.

Triplet lambs Sage, Thyme and Mint

We will follow Rosemary through lambing, weaning, docking, shearing, drenching, dipping and more. The aim is to get urban children and adults excited about what rural New Zealand has to offer and to teach everyone something new about the life of a sheep in New Zealand.

New! Introducing Rosemary 25-Aug-2011

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Rosemary The Sheep had triplets! “Hi, I'm Rosemary, on 28 July 2011 I had triplet lambs. My owners thought I was pretty clever! Farmer Anne's friends have named my lambs Sage, Thyme and Mint. You will be surprised to see how much they have grown!


Follow me on Facebook to see what my life is like on the farm in the hill country of the Tararua District in New Zealand.” Read More



Calls for help from the Christchurch Women's Refuge and the Dallington Community Hub in the eastern suburbs have resulted in a great example of teamwork, with The Warehouse donating a supply of warm pyjamas, children’s underwear, bed socks and hot water bottles.

Within a day of making a phone call to The Warehouse, executive officer Noeline Holt had secured a supply of winter woolies from the Wellington branches of the company, which pooled a trolley load of clothing and hotwater bottles valued at more than $600.

A call was then made to Allied Pickford Moving Company which generously transported the goods down to Christchurch free of charge.

Meanwhile Canterbury based Rural Women New Zealand member, Helen Heddell, coordinated a team of volunteers to deliver lamb roasts to the hard hit areas in the suburbs of Christchurch.

We have many examples of teamwork from all sectors of New Zealand, with outstanding contributions and ideas from our own membership working with their communities in support of Canterbury”, Noeline Holt said.

Teaming up with The Warehouse 25-Aug-2011

Thursday, August 25, 2011



Calls for help from the Christchurch Women's Refuge and the Dallington Community Hub in the eastern suburbs have resulted in a great example of teamwork, with The Warehouse donating a supply of warm pyjamas, children’s underwear, bed socks and hot water bottles. Read More



The third assault of the Central Otago Rail Trail by Rural Women New Zealand at the end of April was an awesome event to have been part of, says organiser Pat Macaulay.

“All the participants agreed that you could easily add a fourth ‘F’ to the challenge title – ‘Fitness, Fun, Friendship and Fantastic experience!”

Ninety-two members and friends joined in the three day event, including 28 walkers, 54 bikers and their support crew.  Participants came from all parts of the country and as far afield as Australia, including a team of three sisters who took up the challenge for the third time.

Central Otago turned on perfect weather for the riders and walkers, who received a special welcome to the area by Mayoress Bernie Lepper, and Daphne Hull, chair of the Otago Central Rail Trail Trust.  Mayor Tony Lepper also joined the bikers and walkers during their lunch break at Galloway.

Celebrity chef Jo Seager gave a talk at Omakau about her involvement with Hospice New Zealand, and a charity auction raised approximately $4,000, which will be shared between the Otago and Southland Hospices. 

Jo Seager also joined the group on their visit to the International Curling Rink at Naseby for an evening of fun on and off the ice.

Leaving Ranfurly Railway Station on Sunday morning, Maniototo baritone and high country farmer David McAtamney, sent everyone on their way to Middlemarch with a rousing rendition of “Oh What a Beautiful Morning”.

Local East-Otago Waikouaiti member, Aileen Winmill, took part with a team of friends from the area.   With Aileen’s initiative a further $1,000 was raised for the Otago Hospice as four local businesses sponsored this team.

Triple ‘F’ Challenge – fitness, fun and friendship

Wednesday, August 03, 2011



The third assault of the Central Otago Rail Trail by Rural Women New Zealand at the end of April was an awesome event to have been part of, says organiser Pat Macaulay. Read More



Be part of a world-wide phenomenon and join in our ACWW Women Walk the World challenge!

Visiting South Pacific Area President, Ruth Shanks, outlined the plan for this event at National Conference 2011.

She said on ACWW Day, 29th April 2012, members throughout the world are being asked to join in ‘Women Walk the World for ACWW’. The aim of the walk is to raise the image and promote the work of ACWW as well as increase funds through sponsorship of the walkers.

“The walk could be an organised ramble, a walk around a neighbourhood, a stroll in a park or whatever you like.”

We are keen to set our own challenge as part of this event, to walk the length of New Zealand!  New Zealand is 1600 kilometres long, so if each of our seven regions arranges walks totalling 230 kilometres in length, we will be have walked the entire length of the country.

This could be a great way to encourage health and fitness and have lots of fun along the way, as well as promoting our organisation and ACWW. 

Make sure you let national office know your plans and we’ll help with publicity for your events.

For more information go to www.acww.org.uk.

ACWW – Walk the Length of New Zealand

Wednesday, August 03, 2011



Be part of a world-wide phenomenon and join in our ACWW Women Walk the World challenge! Read More

New Zealand has a thing or two to learn from Australia when it comes to getting women on boards.

In May, the Minister of Women’s Affairs, Hon Hekia Parata, met some of Australia’s top business leaders to understand how dramatic changes in Australian business culture are driving a surge in the number of women on company boards.

Under Australian Securities Exchange (ASX) rules introduced last year, companies are required to set measurable targets for the advancement of women into senior management and board roles. Business across the Tasman is responding positively because they see advantages for themselves in having more women in leadership.

“These changes are largely driven by male business leaders, who are building gender equality into the strategies of their companies,” says Pamela Cohen, Director of the Nominations Service at the Ministry of Women’s Affairs.

The targets set are often ambitious, with senior managers being offered incentives to achieve them. For example, the Commonwealth Bank of Australia has a target of 35 percent women in senior management roles by 2014 – and to achieve this, 65 percent of appointments over the next three years will need to be women.

According to Ms Cohen, the key to faster change in Australia is that the business leaders themselves see the advantages – including better productivity and improved business performance – and are pushing the change. There’s a champions group of 12 business leaders – including the CEOs of Qantas, Telstra, IBM and New Zealander Sir Ralph Norris, CEO of the Commonwealth Bank of Australia.

“There is also an effective mentoring programme, which involves 56 of the top chairs in Australia.”

The NZ Ministry of Women's Affairs is investigating ways of getting greater business involvement in increasing women's leadership here.

“Helping to establish a champions group is certainly one of the options, because what Australia tells us is that change really takes off when it is business leaders themselves that take the lead.”

New Zealand women can also promote change as individuals and collectively. They can use their positions as shareholders and employees to ask why the companies with which they are associated are not making full use of women’s skills, and they can join and support organisations that are working for change.

Women on boards: what we can learn from Australia 03-Aug-2011

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

New Zealand has a thing or two to learn from Australia when it comes to getting women on boards. Read More

We congratulate the NZ Landcare Trust, which received top honours in the ‘Caring for our Water’ category in the 2011 Green Ribbon Awards, announced at Parliament in June.

Rural Women New Zealand is one of seven trustees on the NZ Landcare Trust Board and many RWNZ members work at grass roots level alongside the Trust.

The Trust works with farmers, landowners and community groups to improve the sustainability of our landscapes and waterways.

Minister for the Environment, Nick Smith, said the Trust earned the award, “For their outstanding contribution to improving freshwater management across the country by engaging private land-owners in environmental protection work.”

Board chair Richard Thompson paid tribute to the Trust’s dedicated staff who focus on delivering the Trust’s vision of ‘sustainable land management through community engagement’. These staff include RWNZ member Barbara Stuart, who works as a Regional Co-ordinator in the top of the South Island. Mr Thompson also acknowledged the passion and hard work of the people in rural communities that the Trust works with.

Based in Cable Bay, RWNZ member Barbara Stuart is the Regional Co-ordinator responsible for Landcare projects in the Nelson/Marlborough area.  We spoke with her about her work, after the Green Ribbon Award win was announced.

She was full of praise for the support of Rural Women NZ members in her region, especially Rai Valley and Bainham branch members.

“The Rai Valley Rural Women are absolute Trojans in working on water quality and we’ve had great support from Bainham as well.”

Barbara says her role is to support private landowners in sustainable land management, working with communities where water quality problems have been shown to exist.

“Our job is to help our farmers to deal with that.  We like our farmers to be the leaders, so they commissioned their own scientific reports and together they all sat around and decided how to deal with it.  It’s a bottom up approach, working with land-owners and land care groups to help them to resolve their own industry issues.”

Barbara sees it as important for farmers to get the right advice, so they spend their dollar once and well.  In the Rai Valley, AgResearch, Dairy NZ and Fonterra specialists have provided technical advice to ensure the systems put in place will work in high rainfall areas on valley floors.

The three key messages being promoted by the Trust are that livestock needs to be kept out of water through fencing systems; there needs to be sufficient effluent storage capacity, with councils pushing for two to three months; and the effluent should be spread on the land at low rates when the soils can take it up, to capture the nutrients, thus saving the farmer money.

In July the Trust is launching new fact sheets to help maintain and improve water quality in Golden Bay.  The fact sheets are tailored to the local area and farmers help to write them. 

“We utilise our farmer skills to lead the projects, and I am really proud to say that when it comes to environmental issues, it is the farming women who ‘get it’,” says Barbara.  “They are so receptive.  They nurture their land as they nurture their families.  They are quick to pick up the concepts of tipping points of production.” 

“This is quite new for farming families.  It is something we haven’t had to confront before.  You could always buy more land.”

Barbara and her farmer husband Ian both come from pioneer families with good networks, which is important for her work.

“I am passionate about working with the rural community to help position them to farm in the third millennium.” 

She points to the pressure to produce food for a planet that is reaching peak population and the coming shortage of fossil fuels and fertilisers.

“There is a whole new way of thinking and in the past our farmers have been highly innovative and it is about tapping into that innovation in rural communities to make that next step forward.”

Green ribbon awards 03-Aug-2011

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

We congratulate the NZ Landcare Trust, which received top honours in the ‘Caring for our Water’ category in the 2011 Green Ribbon Awards, announced at Parliament in June. Read More

Wow!  In the first week since our launch, 100,000 people visited our aftersocks™ website and thousands of comments were posted on our aftersocks™ Facebook page, congratulating us on this wonderful fundraiser to support the Christchurch Mayoral Fund.  We increased our sock order with the NZ Sock Company in Ashburton several times over, and still we’ll be struggling to meet demand as aftersocks™ goes global.

When you get your pair of aftersocks™ don’t forget to send in photos of the awesome places you’ve worn them by for our ‘Quaking in Your aftersocks™’ photo competition.  Upload your photos and tag yourself on Facebook, to be in to win one of several photographic prize packs that have been donated by photographers across the country.  aftersocks™ can be purchased through www.aftersocks.co.nz.

On a more sobering note, feedback from Christchurch is that with the ongoing earthquakes and thousands of aftershocks, stress levels are now very high leading to abuse, depression, violence and bullying.

After the September 3rd earthquake members raised $10,000 to support people affected by the earthquake.  Following the February 22 earthquake this amount swelled to $20,000 with a generous donation from the Queensland Country Women’s Association of $8469.  The South Australia Country Women’s Association International Committee also gifted $1,000 for knitting wool for garments to be sent to Christchurch.  We thank both groups for their fantastic support.  We are working through the process of how this funding will be put to best use.

Rock Those Socks 03-Aug-2011

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Wow!  In the first week since our launch, 100,000 people visited our aftersocks™ website and thousands of comments were posted on our aftersocks™ Facebook page, congratulating us on this wonderful fundraiser to support the Christchurch Mayoral Fund.  We increased our sock order with the NZ Sock Company in Ashburton several times over, and still we’ll be struggling to meet demand as aftersocks™ goes global. Read More



When ‘Farmy Army’ members rolled up their sleeves to clean up the liquefaction in Christchurch after the June earthquake, RWNZ member Helen Heddell also launched into action to organise the catering crews to ensure no-one was working on an empty stomach.

By the end of the week she’d co-ordinated the cooking of 1200 hot dinners, been up at dawn to cook breakfast for the volunteers and arranged packed lunches for the hundreds of workers as they left for another long day shovelling silt.

Helen says ‘don’t ask how my feet are!’ but otherwise she’s very happy with the support she and caterer Nicki Geddes have had for the huge logistical exercise.

She says lessons learnt from the clean up in February helped.  “We have simplified it right down,”

For a week Helen’s day began at 7am at the Canterbury Showgrounds cooking omelettes, bacon and muffins for those who camped overnight.

20 women then turned up each day to help with whatever was required.  They began by making packed lunches for the Student Volunteers and the Farmy Army, who set out with wheelbarrows, diggers and bobcats to clean up the grey liquefaction that covered many of the city’s streets and gardens.

“Rural women have been very supportive,” says Helen, with many city folk pitching in as well. “We had 12 women from Oamaru and a group from Hawke’s Bay turned up out of the woodwork.”

The amount of baking that came in was ‘phenomenal’.  “It is amazing, we have four wheel drives turning up every half hour full of it.”  Two transport companies and one stock firm collected baking from as far afield as Southland. 

Mid-afternoon, preparation for the evening meal began, with hearty food on the menu. 

Helen arranged sponsorship of the meat from the meat companies and processors, as she did for the February clean up.  “They have been fantastic.  People have just been so good.”

Cooking up a storm to feed the Farmy Army 03-Aug-2011

Wednesday, August 03, 2011



When ‘Farmy Army’ members rolled up their sleeves to clean up the liquefaction in Christchurch after the June earthquake, RWNZ member Helen Heddell also launched into action to organise the catering crews to ensure no-one was working on an empty stomach. Read More

A jumbo cheque presentation to the NZ Breast Cancer Foundation at National Conference 2011 was a fitting finale to our wonderful Let’s Get Plastered for Breast Cancer campaign.
We sold 1600 plastering kits and members held more than 20 events around the country to display the colourful breast sculptures produced by creative members, to promote breast cancer awareness.

Our campaign raised $16,000 for the Foundation.  Their Chief Executive Evangelia Henderson thanked Rural Women for the amazing support and said the funds would go to a worthy cause that will help many rural women in the future.  The money is to be used for a research project being conducted at Otago Univesity by Associate Professor Susan Dovey, who is comparing the outcomes for rural women versus urban women who suffer from breast cancer, and the different treatment choices they make.

Let's Get Plastered 03-Aug-2011

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

A jumbo cheque presentation to the NZ Breast Cancer Foundation at National Conference 2011 was a fitting finale to our wonderful Let’s Get Plastered for Breast Cancer campaign.
We sold 1600 plastering kits and members held more than 20 events around the country to display the colourful breast sculptures produced by creative members, to promote breast cancer awareness. Read More

There has been a heart-warming response to our Communities Knitting Together project to support Cantabrians after the earthquakes, with donations pouring in from members and friends all over the country. 

Thousands of warm knitted items have been distributed to those in need.

Canterbury councillor, Kerry Maw, has delivered several mini-van loads of beautifully-knitted warm items to community, church and school contacts who’ve been giving them out as quickly as they’ve arrived.

“Some of the women had tears in their eyes, they were so overwhelmed,” says Kerry.

Groups who’ve helped distribute the knitting include Birthright, the Salvation Army, the Aranui Community Trust and the Dallington Hub Community Group.  “They have been blown away by the support,” says Kerry.

The mountains of knitting included hats, scarves, jerseys, booties and slippers, as well as knee rugs and peggy square blankets.

The project has united communities, just as Kerry hoped it would.

“I knew there would be a really good response, but I was surprised at just how much people got into it!” 

Alongside Rural Women New Zealand knitters, items have been received from spinners and weavers clubs, Lions and community craft groups.

Cathy from the Aranui Community Trust says the items have been given directly to families in need through their nurses and earthquake co-ordinators, as well as through church groups that the Trust links in with.

“Families are over the moon because it’s really cold here.”

All the items Aranui’s received from our Communities Knitting Together project have been given out, and more can still be used says Cathy.  She says hundreds of beanies and babies bonnets have been distributed.  “Jerseys go as fast as they come in.”

While our Communities Knitting Together project has now finished, if anyone would like to continue knitting for those in need in Christchurch, we have a list of community groups where items can be sent directly.  Please contact national office for details.

[In a box]  Margaret Townsend of Piako-Waikato East provincial promoted the Communities Knitting Together project by word of mouth and through her local community newspaper and was amazed at the number of items she received.

A mammoth one hundred and eight boxes were filled with knitting, blankets and warm clothing that arrived from neighbours, friends, family and the wider community.  A local carrier transported the knitting and clothing to Canterbury free of charge.  Many of the donations simply arrived on Margaret’s doorstep, but she also drove to places she’s never been before to pick up knitting, she says.  “I am sure [the great response] was because we were Rural Women.  It was absolutely brilliant.”

[In a box]  In Tauranga, members decided to support Glassons’ project to sell black and red scarves as a Canterbury earthquake fundraiser.  “We have so far knitted 25 red and black scarves,” says Mary McTavish.  “As well as this we have been busy knitting supporting the “Communities Knitting Together” campaign.  We delivered to the local Red Cross offices in Tauranga 280 items of hand knitting including teddy bears, beanies, hats, scarves, slippers and children’s jumpers.”  Great work Tauranga members!


Knitting Communities Together 03-Aug-2011

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

There has been a heart-warming response to our Communities Knitting Together project to support Cantabrians after the earthquakes, with donations pouring in from members and friends all over the country.   Read More

Read All NewsRecent news


The Family Violence Act 2018 must protect victims’ privacy and accessibility to support services, says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“Sharing and disclosing information between government sectors, such as health and education, may place the privacy of family violence victims at risk," says RWNZ National President, Fiona Gower.

“Although RWNZ supports the Government’s efforts to create an effective preventative response to family violence through information sharing, we do not support a system that puts people at risk and leaves victims feeling vulnerable and unable to seek help because they are afraid of confidentiality breaches.”

“However, for many rural families, there are no “on the ground agencies” to provide services desperately needed and this remains our fundamental concern.”

“Rural victims of family violence often cannot leave their situations easily and this isolation and lack of support is significant as 39% of rural women will experience violence, compared to 33% of urban women, as cited in our submission on the Family Violence Legislation Bill in July 2017,” says Ms Gower.

ENDS.

 

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria. 

 

 

RURAL SCHOOL BUS SERVICE REVIEW NEEDED

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is calling for a review of the school bus eligibility criteria, particularly in the rural areas.

“The safest way for children to get to school in rural New Zealand is by bus, however, the current eligibility criteria for the service means that children are being put in dangerous situations,” says Education Portfolio Convenor and Board Member, Sue Higgins.

“If children live within two kilometres of a rural school they are not eligible for the local bus service where there is one, and are forced to walk or cycle on roads with no shoulders, often used by logging trucks, stock trucks and milk tankers, making it treacherous for our children.

“RWNZ understands that parents are responsible for ensuring their children go to school, however, the rural bus is vital for farming families who have both a busy working life and distance, for those who live further away, to contend with.

“A review of the criteria applied to children’s eligibility for their local rural school bus service is needed – school by school.

“It’s time the Government showed leadership on keeping our rural children safe on their journey to and from school,” says Mrs Higgins.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 

Rural school bus service review needed.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria.  Read More

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit. 

 

MEDIA RELEASE

16 August 2018
For immediate release

 

RURAL MATERNITY CARE IN CRISIS

The downgrading of maternity care in rural Otago and Southland will be catastrophic says Rural Women New Zealand(RWNZ).

“On top of the news that Lumsden’s birthing unit has been downgraded to a pre- and post-natal care unit, RWNZ understands that Wanaka has lost its bid to have a primary birthing unit and this does not bode well for rural communities,” says Board Member and Health Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Whilst RWNZ is somewhat pleased that Lumsden will retain care facilities for any woman with pre- and post-natal needs, women ready to give birth will need to travel at least 50 kilometres to the nearest delivery suite.

“Wanaka is expecting 200 births this coming year and there will be no primary birthing unit, and like Lumsden, will become a hub.

“The Otago-Southland region has a huge hinterland with many young parents who are choosing to have families and raise them in this wonderful part of the world and are at risk due to distance from the maternity care they are entitled to.

"No consideration has been given to those parents who have needed the services provided at Lumsden and already travelling up to two hours, now having an extra 50 kilometres added.

“When assessing maternity needs there is always two lives to consider, the mother and the child, and its outrageous that at the time in their lives when they should be close to their families they are not able to be, due to poor decision-making.

“It is not acceptable that pregnant women in rural areas of the South Island are now miles away from anywhere that can support them to have safe births, something a rural impact analysis would have highlighted.

“It’s time the Government and DHB ensured rural communities have the same access to maternity care as urban communities expect,” says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

For more information, please contact National Office.

[email protected]

04 473 5524

 

 

 

 

 

Rural maternity care in crisis

Thursday, August 16, 2018

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit.  Read More

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

New Zealand's farming women celebrating 125 years on

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

 

 

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards will be held on the evening of Tuesday, 20 November 2018 in Wellington in the Banquet Hall at Parliament.

A review of the Enterprising Rural Women Awards has been completed by the RWNZ Board with feedback from members and participants, external advice, and the awards partners.

The awards have been renamed the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards and NZI is the Premier Partner. The categories have been broadened, the application process has been updated and the judging criteria strengthened.

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards give an outstanding opportunity to showcase your business. The event attracts extensive media coverage and promotional opportunities. All winners will receive a membership of Rural Women New Zealand for one year. All category winners will each receive $1000 in prize money and a trophy, and the Supreme Winner will receive a further $1000 in prize money.

 

 

“Winning the Supreme Award was such an amazing result. I am proud of my achievements and honoured to be surrounded by such inspiring, talented and strong women,”

- Debra Cruickshank of Tannacrieff Wines, Supreme winner 2017.

 

The categories for the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards 2018 are:

  • Emerging business: Awarded to a business starting out in its journey and achieving exceptional results. Open to businesses that have been running from 2 – 5 years.
  • Love of the Land: Harnessing the potential of New Zealand’s land, environment or products of the land, to create a successful business enterprise.
  • Creative Arts: A business specialising in the creative arts working in a rural environment or using rural materials.
  • Innovation: An enterprise that challenges the status quo to bring something new and innovative to the market or utilising rural resources in an innovative way.
  • Rural Champion: A person or business who champions the rural sector or a rural enterprise – an outstanding contributor who goes above and beyond the normal in their support rural enterprise. Open to anybody.
 

A Supreme winner will be chosen from all category finalists, who has shown excellence and outstanding achievement across all entry criteria.

Please read the media release launching the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards here:

If you are interested in supporting the awards as a category partner, please contact [email protected].

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

Wednesday, October 03, 2018

  Read More