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RWNZ has made a submission on an application to the Minister for the Environment for a water conservation order on the Ngaruroro River and Clive River, pursuant to Section 201(1) of the Resource Management Act 1991.

RWNZ opposes aspects of the application for the water conservation order that propose to limit the take of water from the lower River, in particular below Whanawhana. Consistent with other applications submitted (eg: Irrigation NZ, HB Fruitgrowers, and Horticulture NZ) we oppose the application applying to connected groundwater of the Ngaruroro River and consider that the applicants have not defined the nature or extent of the groundwater they propose to be covered by the order. 

Should the Tribunal determine that the application is appropriate for the lower River, we oppose the range of controls and prohibitions suggested within the draft order for the stretch below Whanawhana Cableway. We propose that an alternative range of controls, limits and restrictions be considered that are enabling of food, fibre and wine production values.

We consider that food, wine and fibre production are values that are integral to the cultural identity and economic wellbeing of the local communities and any revised water conservation order should consider the protection of those values because they are outstanding, both nationally and regionally.

We note that the applicants have failed to consider the needs of rural families and communities who derive their livelihood from primary and secondary production. The region is a food producing region and many rural families and communities are dependent on and involved in the primary or secondary production industries and their service industries in some way.

It is apparent to us that the applicants have not given due consideration to the downstream consequences of reducing the ability for producers of food, fibre and wine to have access to the necessary water to grow their crops. We need to ensure that crops are viable and the irrigation of crops is fundamental to that viability, especially in low rainfall seasons.  

RWNZ recognises that it is sometimes difficult to balance the environmental interests and the interests of recreation users and growers and producers. We submit that the interests of people who make a living from the land and the communities that derive their living from the production and manufacture of primary produce must be fairly factored into the equation.

Should the application be approved as submitted it would have the effect of disadvantaging the economic welfare of both the producers of wine and food and the other local businesses that gain their income from the revenue generated by the producers.

Click here to download the Submission.

 

Submission on water conservation order on Ngaruroro River and Clive River

Monday, August 28, 2017

RWNZ has made a submission on an application to the Minister for the Environment for a water conservation order on the Ngaruroro River and Clive River, pursuant to Section 201(1) of the Resource Management Act 1991. Read More

The Justice and Electoral Committee is seeking feedback on the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill (No 2).

Rural Women New Zealand’s (RWNZ) submission supports the intent of the Bill, especially in regards to the protection of landlords and tenants from the harmful effects of methamphetamine contamination. However, there are ways in which the Bill could improve to provide greater protections for landlords and tenants.

RWNZ recognises that the manufacture of methamphetamine is a widespread, clandestine issue in New Zealand. In our submission, RWNZ noted that the lack of police resources in rural areas can make them a target location for methamphetamine manufacture because there is less risk of getting caught. RWNZ also referenced a case study that shows how harmful methamphetamine contamination in homes can be to the health of tenants, especially children.

In order to provide greater protection for tenants, RWNZ suggested that landlords must be held liable to test for methamphetamine contamination before a tenant moves in if requested by the incoming tenant. In regards to the high cost of methamphetamine testing, RWNZ recommended that the Bill be amended to state that tenants responsible for the methamphetamine contamination should be responsible for all costs involved with the damage that are not covered by a landlord’s insurance. This removes an undue burden on landlords, who should not be held liable to pay the costs incurred by methamphetamine contamination.

"Tenants must be made responsible for the damage they cause to the landlord's property,” says Fiona Gower, National President of Rural Women New Zealand. “This includes the cost of remediating contamination caused by tenants who use or manufacture methamphetamine.”

Click here to read the Submission

 

Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill (No2) Submission

Thursday, August 10, 2017

The Justice and Electoral Committee is seeking feedback on the Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill (No 2).  Read More

 Rural Women New Zealand Rural Connectivity Award

Rural Women New Zealand are offering a new award this year: Rural Women New Zealand Rural Connectivity Award. The award has been established to recognise the importance of connectivity to rural communities and agri-businesses in rural areas. The award celebrates journalism that helps raise awareness about the issues and benefits of rural connectivity.

Examples of subjects that could be included as entries:

- Online learning and education materials for students

- Farm management programmes / apps

- Farm safety management

- Health management

- Maintaining connections with family, friends and community

- Business capabilities and growth

- Accessing research and development programmes

- Rural broadband initiatives and infrastructure

Entries in the RWNZ Rural Connectivity Award 2017 must be of two articles, radio broadcasts or television programmes broadly based on the theme of rural connectivity.

Entries closed Tuesday 12 September.

Any New Zealand-based journalist or communicator is eligible to enter the award. The winner will receive $750 in prize money. 

Click here to download an entry form.

 

 

Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award 2017

Entries have closed for the Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award 2017, which will be presented at the NZ Guild of Agricultural Journalists annual awards dinner in Wellington on 13 October.

The Rural Women New Zealand award encourages journalists to report on the achievements of women living and working in rural communities.

Entries in the RWNZ Journalism Award 2017 must be of two articles, radio broadcasts or television programmes broadly based on the theme of “rural women making a difference.” This could be in the sense of community involvement, on farm, or in another rural-based business or activity.

“RWNZ is proud to sponsor this Award for journalism features celebrating the achievements of rural women, through enterprise or volunteering in roles that support their rural community,” says Fiona Gower, National President of Rural Women New Zealand.

Nadine Porter was the winner of the 2016 Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award. Nadine's winning articles featured research on rural women and isolation, and the role of social media and were published in the Ashburton Guardian Farming.

Entries closed Wednesday 6 September 2017. Any New Zealand-based journalist or communicator is eligible to enter the award. The winner will receive $750 in prize money.

Click here to download an entry form.


 

 

The Ministry of Education is seeking feedback on the draft Digital Technologies | Hangarau Matihiko (DT|HM) curriculum.

Rural Women New Zealand’s (RWNZ) submission supports the curriculum and its intent to prepare New Zealand’s students for the increasingly digital world. However, RWNZ is concerned about the curriculum being applied in rural areas, where there is not equitable access to digital technologies.

The three core issues with implementing the DT|HM curriculum that RWNZ has focused on in the submission are the lack of sufficient funding for rural schools, training for teachers, and access to reliable internet connectivity. RWNZ noted that although access to reliable broadband has improved in rural schools, not all rural homes and communities are sufficiently equipped. Therefore, rural students that do not have access to reliable internet would be unable to complete the required coursework outside of school hours.

“It is vital that all students in New Zealand have access to all learning opportunities,” says RWNZ National President, Fiona Gower. “They shouldn't be missing these opportunities because of funding or training restrictions or because of where they live. There needs to be equity for all, so no children are left behind in the learning of what is now considered an important part of the curriculum.”

In the submission, RWNZ has requested that the curriculum include a strategic plan that will ensure all schools are provided with adequate resources so that learning outcomes can be consistent across the country. This plan should include a training budget to be used for professional learning and development in the use of digital technologies for teachers; ensuring access to reliable internet connectivity both at school and in homes; and providing all schools and students with the same technology and other resources needed to implement the curriculum.

Click here to download the Submission.

 

Equity of access, funding and training concerns for draft Digital Technologies curriculum

Thursday, August 10, 2017

The Ministry of Education is seeking feedback on the draft Digital Technologies | Hangarau Matihiko (DT|HM) curriculum.  Read More

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Congratulations to the National Competition Winners for 2017

Tarrant Bell & Tutaenui Bell Speech contest topic: “Why Not?”

Tutaenui Bell and Tarrant Bell

1st Place Alex Thompson, Amuri Dinner Branch, Region 2

2nd Place Leona Trimble, Hampden Branch, Region 1


Marlborough Short Story & Olive Burdekin short story “ What a Fuss”

1000-1500 words for Marlborough Short Story – Kerry France, Moa Flat Branch, Region 1 for “Guess what I am.” Dominion Essay Tray and voucher from Region 3

 

1500- 2000 words for Olive Burdekin – Chrissy Sumby, Kenepuru Branch, Region 3 for “Bay Swimming” Voucher from Region 3

 

Cora Wilding- insulated Pot Stand - any medium

Melva Robb – Marlborough Provincial, 1st Place, Region 3


Olive Craig Trophy Member of Excellence (Judged by the National Board) Sue Hall Region 6


Talbot Trophy- best Provincial, Branch or Group International Officer report

International Officer - Melva Robb – Marlborough Provincial, 1st Place, Region 3

 

The Honora O’Neill Gong is for the best Provincial, Sandra Curd, Mid Canterbury Region 2

 

Branch or Group President’s Report: Carolyn McLellan, Bainham Branch Region 3

The Lady Blundell Tray Competition

for the most innovative project completed by an individual, Group, Branch, Provincial or Region.

Winner: Amuri Dinner Group.


 

National Competition Winners 2017

Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Congratulations to the National Competition Winners for 2017 Read More

Rural untracked parcels change

 

From 1 February, New Zealand Post customers will see the cost of sending untracked parcels to rural addresses increase by $3.70.

This charge, which was initially only placed on Tracked, Courier and Courier Signature parcels will now also be applied to untracked parcels sent to a rural address as a means to offset fixed costs associated with deliver to rural locations.

New Zealand Post has stated that these costs are a result of the continuing decrease in letter volumes.

 

Despite ongoing cost reductions made, this change is said to be necessary to continue to operate a sustainable network.

For business account customers, the change will take effect on 1 July 2018 as set out in their contacts.

 

 

Rural Post Prices to Change

Thursday, January 18, 2018

Rural untracked parcels change
 Read More

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events.

The Rural Support Trust advise farmers to ensure stock and domestic animals have food, water, and shelter where necessary, and are secure. Ensure that all stock injuries are promptly attended too, after human needs are met.

If your farm or rural property or stock has been affected by an adverse event and you need assistance, contact your local Rural Support Trust on 0800 787 254 (0800 RURAL HELP) with information on the impacts on your farm, or requests for help.

The Rural Women New Zealand Adverse Events and Relief Fund is available to individuals, communities and groups, with a particular emphasis on rural women and children. The fund provides financial assistance to persons or groups, where there is an identified urgent need due to recent adverse events such as drought, fires, floods or earthquakes.

Click here to read more about applying for the fund.

Contact details for support agencies:

The Rural Support Trust (RST organise community events and one-on-one mentoring, as well as targeted support services in emergency situations)  
http://www.rural-support.org.nz Ph: 0800 787 254.

DairyNZ: Sharemilkers support http://www.dairynz.co.nz/farm/tactics/support-for-sharemilkers/

Federated Farmers http://www.fedfarm.org.nz/ Ph: 0800 327 646 or drought feedline 0800 376 844.

Doug Avery’s Resilient Farmer http://www.resilientfarmer.co.nz/

Farmstrong http://www.farmstrong.co.nz


If you just want to talk, or know someone who is at risk, there are a range of support options available, including counselling services:

Lifeline: 0800 543 354 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling

Youthline: 0800 376 633 or free text 234 - Provides 24 hour telephone and text counselling services for young people

Samaritans: 0800 726 666 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling.

Women's Refuge: 0800 REFUGE (733 843) a 24/7 crisis and support line provide advice and information.

Shakti New Zealand 0800SHAKTI (0800 742 584) If you are in a situation of domestic violence call our 24-hour crisis line, and multi-lingual staff will provide information.

Tautoko: 0508 828 865 - provides support, information and resources to people at risk of suicide, and their family, whānau and friends.

What'sup: 0800 942 8787 (0800 What’s Up) is a counselling helpline for children and young people, aged 5-18. Phone Mon-Fri 1-10pm, Sat-Sun 3-10pm.

Kidsline: 0800 543 754, it is a 24/7 helpline for children and teens, run by specially trained youth volunteers.

Thelowdown.co.nz - Free Text 5626, watch videos or contact for support. 

depression.org.nz National Depression Initiative (for adults), 0800 111 757 - 24 hour service 

Ministry for Children Oranga Tamariki If you're worried about a child or family that you know, there are ways you can help, contact Child, Youth and Family.

For information about suicide prevention, see http://www.spinz.org.nz .

If it is an emergency, or you feel yourself, or someone you know is at risk, please call 111.

Rural community support services

Thursday, April 06, 2017

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events. Read More

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World.

It’s a great way to come together, catch up with friends and have some fun and healthy exercise along the way.

The date for the event is Sunday 29 April– ACWW Day - though walks can take place at other dates around that time if more convenient.

Here’s What You Do:

1.Decide on a walk for your group. It can range from a stroll around the park, a hike through the bush, an amble around a neighbourhood or along a walkway.
2.Invite others. This is a great way to reach out to new potential members, and include families and friends.
3.Go to the registration form , fill it in and email [email protected] or post to national office before your walk, so we know what walks are taking place and can promote them.
4.Fund raise through sponsorship, a gold coin donation, or perhaps an afternoon tea or sausage sizzle afterwards.
5.Tally up the number of people who attend and the distance walked.
6.Take photos and send to national office so we can publicise your walks and use on our website and Facebook pages. Email [email protected]
7.Send your funds raised, and details of kilometres walked to national office.

 

 


 

More About The Work Of ACWW

ACWW connects and supports women and communities worldwide by:

• Working in partnership with member societies to offer mutual support
• Connecting at international level through UN representation
• Funding community development projects
• Supporting agricultural initiatives
Find out more about ACWW here.

Women Walk the World 2018

Wednesday, January 17, 2018

This is an annual event, where women’s groups in many countries organise walks in their communities along local tracks and trails, to raise funds for the Associated Country Women of the World. Read More

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.

RWNZ was one of the founding members of ACWW. It is one of the largest international development organisations for rural women.

The ACWW network allows it to engage at the local, national, and international level with the aim of achieving these goals:

- To raise the standard of living for rural women and their families through education, training and community development programmes.

- To provide practical support to our members and help them set up income-generating schemes.

- To support educational opportunities for women and girls, and help eliminate gender discrimination.

- To give rural women a voice at an international level through our links with UN agencies and bodies.

Caption: Delegates from the South Pacific Area Conference in New Plymouth complete the ACWW Walk the World event in April 2017. 

Click here to download an information booklet about ACWW (8MB PDF)

Click here to go to the ACWW website

 

ACWW Study Topic 2017

Friday, June 16, 2017

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.  Read More

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents.

Mr Leggett says the honours are an opportunity to recognise members of the community who give outstanding service to others.

“The recipients use their skills and energy and give their time and talents to a myriad of organisations and causes. They are serving us all by contributing to the greater good and each deserves our grateful thanks,” he said.

Severe earthquakes hit on 14 November 2016 affecting rural people in North Canterbury, Kaikōura and South Marlborough. Melva and Glenda spearheaded delivery of relief supplies to remote rural families.They teamed up with the local Rural Support Trust and Federated Farmers, to contact as many residents as they could to assess what was needed other than food.

“Melva and Glenda’s personal compassion which comes with a loving dollop of practical help, alleviated the sense of isolation and trauma families were experiencing from the Clarence to South Marlborough and the Awatere Valley,” says RWNZ Marlborough member Barbara Stuart. “They took the crisis seriously and did everything in their power to help.”

Glenda and Melva appealed to RWNZ members and the wider community for donations of crockery and dinner sets. They prepared 100 gift baskets of baking, chocolates and soft toys for children and managed to get supplies onto transport that was headed to isolated areas. They even sent a gift basket via helicopter for a family with a new-born baby, who were isolated at the top of the Awatere Valley.

 

The other honours recipients this year are Ross Beech, a farmer-environmentalist and a member of the South Marlborough Landscape Restoration Trust; Jim Thomas, a Lions Club member with a record of service to sport and who has a key role in the local Victim Support service, and Henny Vervaart, a Rotary Club member, Red Cross meals-on-wheels volunteer and a valued part of the Alzheimers Marlborough organisation.

Ends


 

 

Civic Award for Melva Robb and Glenda Robb

Monday, October 09, 2017

 Melva Robb and Glenda Robb are sisters who are very active members of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) Marlborough Provincial. Marlborough Mayor John Leggett has awarded Civic Honours to the sisters, along with three other Marlborough residents. Read More