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RECENT NEWS

Myrtle rust (Austropuccinia psidii) has been found in Northland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty and Taranaki. 

The fungus attacks various species of plants in the Myrtaceae family, also known as the myrtle family. It is found in many parts of the world including New Caledonia and all along Australia's eastern seaboard.

Myrtle rust spores are microscopic and can easily spread across large distances by wind, or via insects, birds, people, or machinery.

It is thought the fungus arrived in New Zealand carried by strong winds from Australia. There have been a number of significant weather events capable of transporting spores here and the discovery of the disease in large, established trees lends weight to this assumption.

MPI and the Department of Conservation (DOC), with the help of local iwi, the nursery industry and local authorities are running a large operation to determine the scale of the situation and contain and control myrtle rust in the areas it has been found.

 

If you think you've seen the symptoms of myrtle rust, don't touch it.

  • Call the MPI Exotic Pest and Disease Hotline immediately on 0800 80 99 66.
  • If you have a camera or phone camera, take clear photos, including the whole plant, the whole affected leaf, and a close-up of the spores or affected area of the plant.
  • Don't touch it or try to collect samples as this may increase the spread of the disease.

Don't move myrtle plants or green waste out of  Controlled Area

MPI has introduced a Controlled Area which extends 10km from the known infected areas in Waitara, Taranaki.

It is illegal to move plants (including trees) or plant material (such as garden waste, clippings, feijoa and guava fruit) from the myrtle family out of this area. You can still buy and plant these species inside the Controlled Area.

For more details on the outbreak and how to manage plants affected by Myrtle Rust see the MPI website: http://www.mpi.govt.nz/protection-and-response/responding/alerts/myrtle-rust


 

Information source: Ministry for Primary Industries.

 

 

Myrtle Rust outbreak what you need to know

Thursday, June 29, 2017

Myrtle rust (Austropuccinia psidii) has been found in Northland, Waikato, Bay of Plenty and Taranaki.  Read More

Applications have now closed on for the 2017 Rural Women New Zealand and Access Community Health scholarship programme.
$39,000 has been awarded to rural health professionals in scholarship funds over the past 12 years. 

 

The $3000 scholarship is aimed at applicants who are working in a professional health field with rural connections, and who wish to further their studies in health or disability studies.

"Access Community Health is proud of its 90 year heritage providing home care to New Zealand communities. We are very pleased to support the progression and ongoing development of health professionals and services in New Zealand's rural communities." says Simon Lipscombe, Access Chief Executive.

The scholarship represents the ongoing special relationship between Access, now a member of the Green Cross Health group, and its founding organisation, Rural Women New Zealand.

“Since 2004, scholarship recipients have ranged from paramedics through to nurse practitioners,” says Fiona Gower, Rural Women New Zealand National President. “They have a common aspiration to undertake further training and develop their professional knowledge, so they can continue to provide quality health services in rural communities.”

Applications for the Rural Women New Zealand and Access Community Health Scholarship closed on 1 July 2017. Preference will be given to applicants who are studying at post-graduate level. 

 

The 2017 Scholarship recipient will be announced shortly.

RWNZ recently sent out a survey on Boarding Bursaries, asking members a series of questions, to enable us to provide evidence-based data around the key issues on how the costs of boarding students and the associated issues impact on our rural families.

The information provided formed the report to the Ministry of Education in response to the review on access and the multiple barriers allowances offered by the Ministry of Education’s Boarding Allowance Scheme. 

Eighty survey responses were received, and while each had its own individual comments, there were some common themes.

Question one asked whether or not people believed the value of access barriers and multiple allowance barriers is sufficient. A minority believe the value is sufficient because it is only an assistance, however the majority believe it falls short of the ever-increasing costs of boarding school and fails to take into account certain family circumstances, such as a one parent household, multiple children or a low income household.

As a result of not attending boarding school, children can face disadvantages such as a limited range of extra-curricular activities, or attending a local school which “may not provide a very high standard of education, holding bright children back from achieving their potential.”

Respondents were also asked whether they believed there were families who are eligible to receive allowances but do not apply. Surprisingly, a majority said that they do know of families in this position. Some parents have had issues in the past, and find the process stressful. Other parents have simply not been aware the allowances exist, and it was suggested schools should have an obligation to advise families about allowances. Some stated the opposite, that in their communities almost everyone applies because the majority are low to middle income earners, and need all financial assistance available.

When asked whether they believed the eligibility criteria are set at the right level, most people disagreed. Those who disagreed believe the distance criteria are too high, and fail to take into account rural areas with rough terrain and narrow windy roads. It can be difficult for families living in isolated areas traveling on gravel roads that are slower to negotiate. However, those who agreed also mentioned there probably needs to be some flexibility for unique cases.

There are many consequences for families who cannot board due to financial reasons. For the child, common consequences include isolation, lack of social contact, lack of friendships and the ability to build new relationships, and a lack of participation in cultural, sporting and other activities. The effect on the whole family includes the cost and stress of relocating, and in some cases dividing the family.

From the survey, the proposed solution is that all children should be given the option to go to boarding school if they wish. They should also have the ability to return back home after their studies as a fulfilled citizen, passionate and influential, with a desire to give back to the community they originated from. The access barriers facing families today that wish to send a child to boarding school are perceived to be a lot harder than in previous years.

Great Barrier Island

There were a large number of responses from Great Barrier Island where the issue of boarding allowances is a “hot topic”, and because they are a small and close-knit community, families regularly engage in open and frank discussions. While correspondence is an option, there were many issues, and are still, with the Correspondence School: Te Kura. Also, correspondence does not fit with every child’s learning needs.

These children take correspondence due to lack of money, and it is felt on the island that they are not receiving a proper education. To make matters worse, this increases their chance of gravitating towards and becoming involved in social activities with negative outcomes.

Great Barrier Island believe that the allowances should also be area-based, and not subject to distance criteria.

 

 

 

Boarding Allowance Scheme Survey

Monday, June 19, 2017

RWNZ recently sent out a survey on Boarding Bursaries, asking members a series of questions, to enable us to provide evidence-based data around the key issues on how the costs of boarding students and the associated issues impact on our rural families. Read More

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.

RWNZ was one of the founding members of ACWW. It is one of the largest international development organisations for rural women.

The ACWW network allows it to engage at the local, national, and international level with the aim of achieving these goals:

- To raise the standard of living for rural women and their families through education, training and community development programmes.

- To provide practical support to our members and help them set up income-generating schemes.

- To support educational opportunities for women and girls, and help eliminate gender discrimination.

- To give rural women a voice at an international level through our links with UN agencies and bodies.

Caption: Delegates from the South Pacific Area Conference in New Plymouth complete the ACWW Walk the World event in April 2017. 

Click here to download an information booklet about ACWW (8MB PDF)

Click here to go to the ACWW website

 

ACWW Study Topic 2017

Friday, June 16, 2017

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand is reassured that the Minister of Police, Paula Bennett, has heard the concerns of our members through our response to the Select Committee report into the illegal possession of firearms.

Minister Bennett has rejected 12 of the 20 report recommendations made by the Select Committee. Those recommendations would have significantly impacted on licensed firearms owners but done little to stop firearms getting into the hands of criminals.

The Select Committee’s terms of reference were to focus on how widespread firearms possession is among criminals, how those people who do not have a firearms licence come into possession of firearms, and what changes, if any, would restrict the flow of firearms to criminals, gangs and people who do not hold a licence.

“This is a positive change for hunters, farmers and shooters,” says Rachael Dean, RWNZ Finance Chair and RWNZ representative on Firearm’s Safety Council and Firearm’s Community Advisory Forum. “Instead of adding to the burdens of licensed firearms’ owners in rural areas, the Minister has placed the focus firmly back on the non-law abiding firearms users.”

Minister Bennett says the policy changes needed to “strike the right balance between public safety and the rights of legal firearms owners. Nobody wants firearms getting into the hands of violent gang members but we also don’t want over the top rules and restrictions to be placed on hunters and shooters who manage their firearms responsibly.”

Click here to read the full recommendations from the Minister of Police .

Firearms policy recommendations sensible for rural sector

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

Rural Women New Zealand is reassured that the Minister of Police, Paula Bennett, has heard the concerns of our members through our response to the Select Committee report into the illegal possession of firearms. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand is a strong supporter for education programmes in schools on all matter of safety in rural environments which includes firearm use. The aim is to increase student and teacher awareness of how to use firearms safely.

In past years, RWNZ has delivered workshops with primary schools on risks in the rural environment, such as animal safety, ATVs, poisons, water safety, civil defence, road safety, rural fires and home security. This included sessions on firearms safety. 

“Research shows that teaching children at a young age how to handle firearms safely, decreases non-intentional firearms incidents, resulting in lives being saved,” says Rachael Dean, RWNZ Finance Chair and RWNZ representative on Firearm’s Safety Council and Firearm’s Community Advisory Forum.

“Towards the end of the 1960’s, statistics show that on average, children were involved in an incident a month from a non-intentional discharge of a firearm. Once education around firearms was introduced, the statistics dropped dramatically.”

Firearms are part of the rural environment and the first concern in educating children in firearms use is safety. Learning to shoot under suitable supervision teaches self-discipline, self-control, hand-eye coordination and concentration. The benefit of firearms’ training in schools is to educate students and adults to help create a better safety culture on farms and lifestyle blocks.

Firearms education programmes in schools

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Rural Women New Zealand is a strong supporter for education programmes in schools on all matter of safety in rural environments which includes firearm use. The aim is to increase student and teacher awareness of how to use firearms safely. Read More

Past National President Wendy McGowan has been named an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to rural women in the Queen's Birthday Honours.

Wendy has been a member of Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) since 1975 and has held offices with the Kaharoa Branch, Provincial and Inter-Provincial Committees. 

She said she felt excited about the honour and very thankful to the people who had nominated her.

In 2005 Mrs McGowan became National Councillor for the Region Five area covering Coromandel to Gisborne.

She was vice president for two years, convened the Social Issues Committee and the Land Use Committee.

Wendy represented RWNZ on the New Zealand Food Safety Consumer Forum for four years.

She was appointed National President of RWNZ from 2013 to 2016, during which time she led the delegation to the 2014 South Pacific Area Conference and the Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) Triennial World Conference.

Wendy oversaw the implementation of changes to the structure of the governing body and rules of RWNZ and negotiated the sale of Access Homehealth Ltd during her term as National President.

She has been an individual member of the ACWW and was part of the RWNZ delegation to the South Pacific Area Conference in Tonga in 2011. She has served on the Rural Community Trust as the RWNZ representative.

Wendy is a member of the Kaimai-Mamaku Catchment Forum and Federated Farmers Rotorua/Taupo Province, and has been president and chairperson of Federated Farmers Meat and Fibre section for the province.

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Congratulations to Rebecca Keoghan

Rebecca Keoghan has been named a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to business, particularly the dairy industry.

Rebecca Keoghan is a RWNZ member and has contributed to the Westland region for the past 10 years. In addition to her role as co-director of a 250 cow, 300 hectare farm Mrs Keoghan was Operations Manager of Westport's Holcim Cement Ltd, controlling the quality production of 500,000 tonnes of clinker and 550,000 tonnes of cement per annum. She led the growth of a 'zero harm' culture for her staff at Holcim.

Currently as Business Manager of Landcorp Farming Ltd she is responsible for the strategic development and management of five large dairy farms in the region, as well as a dairy support farm and a machinery syndicate spanning the Cape Foulwind and Grey Valley areas.

She is a director of Westland Milk Products Ltd and of Buller Holdings, which has responsibility for Buller District Council's commercial assets.

She was formerly Area President of the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society's West Coast Board.
She was a member of the Northern South Island committee of OSPRI, the organisation managing the National Animal Identification and Tracing programme to eliminate bovine tuberculosis from New Zealand.

Rebecca was previously Team Leader and is currently a judge for the Dairy Manager of the Year Award programme for the Dairy Industry Awards. She was the Dairy Women's Network Dairy Woman of the Year in 2016.

 

 

Congratulations to Wendy McGowan

Wednesday, June 07, 2017

Past National President Wendy McGowan has been named an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit for services to rural women in the Queen's Birthday Honours. Read More

Green Party MP Jan Logie’s Domestic Violence - Victims’ Protection Bill is before Parliament and RWNZ asks Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Woodhouse and his fellow MPs to support the Bill.

The Bill seeks to address harms experienced by victims, by focusing on how workplaces can be made a safer and more accommodating place for victims. It would extend leave provisions to include domestic violence leave, as when women leave a violent situation it can be very hard for them to manage court proceedings, counselling, housing and the needs of their children without extra leave. 

Work at a regular time and place can make work a target for the abuser, but with employer support through flexible working arrangements, that can be adjusted to support the employee.

“RWNZ believe that the Bill will have an impact on people who are victims of domestic violence and help support them when they need to leave the relationship,” says Fiona Gower, RWNZ National President.

“Rural women often have to travel long distances between home and work and it can be very difficult for them to move away from a violent relationship.

“The services for helping victims of domestic violence are mostly located in urban areas. Enabling rural women to take time off work to access services, is a step toward helping them to move away from a violent home, and setting a plan in place to rebuild their lives.”

RWNZ recently made a submission on the Government’s family violence law changes, in support of adding protection of animals to legislation. Violence to animals is often part of the package of abuse. Comments were also made about the lack of near-neighbours and isolation in general, also a woman’s support is often from friends and family of the perpetrator.

RWNZ have worked closely with the Ministry of Social Development on the campaign: ‘It’s Not OK‘. RWNZ have held several workshops with the Sophie Elliott Foundation spreading the message of how to recognise healthy relationships, and how to assist someone who is not in a healthy relationship.

Read the Domestic Violence submission here

 

Response to Supplementary Order Paper 

On 1 May, the Justice and Electoral Committee published a Supplementary Order Paper (SOP), which proposes changes to the Domestic Violence-Victims’ Protection Bill.

These changes include allowing employees who have experienced domestic violence to request flexible arrangements no matter how long they have been an employee, requiring employers to respond to requests within a period of five working days once received, and allowing employees who have had their requests denied to seek urgent mediation.

Rural Women New Zealand has submitted on the SOP, believing that the proposed changes will be costly and onerous for rural employers. RWNZ has proposed that the government provide funding or reimbursement for employers for domestic violence paid leave; a recognition that the burden of compliance is greater for Small Medium Enterprises (SMEs), especially for those in rural and small towns; a timeframe for employers’ to provide flexible working arrangements that is reasonable and reflective of the nature of the business; and a stand down period should apply before any entitlement can apply.

Read the Supplementary Order Paper here

 

Submission on Domestic Violence Victims' Protection Bill

Friday, June 02, 2017

Green Party MP Jan Logie’s Domestic Violence - Victims’ Protection Bill is before Parliament and RWNZ asks Workplace Relations and Safety Minister Michael Woodhouse and his fellow MPs to support the Bill. Read More

June 1st is Gypsy Day, when new dairy contacts come into action around the country. Many farmers, their family and staff will be moving around the country to their next farms.

Farmers and their families will be packing up houses and sheds, including pets and stock. People will need to take extra care when travelling as there will be numerous removal trucks, utes and trailer-loads of equipment and stock on the road. 

Farmers may be leaving family and friends behind when they move to new areas. They will need to build support networks and find out about local schools and other community services. This can be challenging as many farms are located in isolated areas, which makes it harder to meet neighbours and get involved in the community.

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) can assist with social connections and contacts for local support agencies. RWNZ branches are located throughout the country and regularly organise get-togethers for women and their families to meet and build social networks through activities and events in their community.

Come meet us at Fieldays 14-17 June at Mystery Creek. The RWNZ stand will be inside the health hub alongside support agencies and health services. Board representatives and members will be on the stand to answer queries about RWNZ and branches in your area.

Coming up in Otorohanga on Tuesday 13 June, a free Women's Wellbeing workshop features speakers from RWNZ and local support agencies. Learn how to recognise the signs of a healthy relationship and develop strategies to support friends and families who may be experiencing difficulties.

In Te Awamutu on Tuesday 20 June, Te Rahu RWNZ Branch are hosting a Comedy Cup event. People are invited to attend wearing fun or fabulous race-day outfits, and participate in quizzes and activities, including a competition for best fascinator.

Join in the activities of a RWNZ branch near you, events are listed on our website www.ruralwomen.org.nz or follow us on Facebook/ruralwomennz or Twitter @ruralwomennz or freephone 0800 256 467 for RWNZ contacts in your region.

 

Gypsy Day

Thursday, June 01, 2017

June 1st is Gypsy Day, when new dairy contacts come into action around the country. Many farmers, their family and staff will be moving around the country to their next farms. Read More

Read All NewsRecent news


(Pictured above: Minister Damien O'Çonnor meeting with RWNZ Chief Executive Officer Penelope England, National President Fiona Gower, National Chair Penny Mudford and Manager of Government, Public Sector and Academic Relationships Angela McLeod.)

 

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release supporting the recent announcement to reintegrate rural proofing into policy development. Please read the media release below. 

 

RURAL PROOFING IS BACK ON THE TABLE

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is pleased to see rural proofing is back on the table and being included in the Government’s policy work.

“Understanding the impact that Government policies, service delivery and business behaviour have on our rural communities is not only vital to the success of the rural economy, it builds and maintains our rural social fabric,” says RWNZ National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ has been calling for rural impact analyses to be carried out in both the public and private sector because decisions have, and are being made that have a detrimental effect on rural communities.

“As a member of the advisory group that supported the development of the Government’s new Rural Proofing Guide for Policy Development and Service Delivery Planning, RWNZ is encouraged by the final document.

“RWNZ will continue to work alongside the Government, its agencies and entities to ensure successful implementation of the Rural Proofing Guide.

“The Government’s new rural proofing policy guidelines will go a long way to alleviating poor policy development and service delivery, and RWNZ is looking forward to seeing better outcomes for rural communities,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact National Office:

[email protected]

 

 

 

 

Rural Proofing Back On the Table

Thursday, June 14, 2018


 Read More

 

Rural Women New Zealand would like to congratulate Alison Van Wyk for her appointment as CEO of Access Community Health. 

 


 

Alison has a background in nursing and possesses sales, marketing and management experience within the pharmaceutical, medical device and healthcare supply chain markets both within New Zealand and internationally. Instrumental in establishing professional programmes of clinical care and advice in pharmacy and the reclassification of medicines for Green Cross Health, Alison has taken a leadership role in advocacy for pharmacy and government relations within the health industry.

Alison commenced her new role effective 18 June 2018.


 

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement this morning that the Government are giving a funding boost to help improve child and family wellbeing. 

 

Read the relevant media here.

 

RURAL WOMEN NEW ZEALAND BACKS GOVERNMENT SUPPORTING FAMILIES

The announcement this morning that the Government will be giving family violence services a boost of $76.2 million is a step in the right direction for our women and families, says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“New Zealand’s rate of violence against women and children is unacceptable – it is great to see the Government increasing support services for women, families, and communities in need," says RWNZ National Chair, Penny Mudford.

The Government also announced that additional funding in 2019/2020 would enable services to expand into areas where there is currently no support.

“Women and children living in rural New Zealand have particular challenges and can be vulnerable to physical and psychological abuse due to their geographic and social isolation.

“For some, living rurally means they are some distance from their families and whānau and do not have the support that the wider family can provide.

“Family violence victims in rural New Zealand do not have the same level of access to psychological and legal support as urban women and children do, due to living rurally.

“RWNZ hope that this boost announced by the Government will be used to empower our rural communities by giving women and children who are victims of violence the help and support they so badly need,” says Ms Mudford.

Ends

Rural Women New Zealand have released a media release raising our concerns for how data is being collected in this year's census.

Please read the media release below.

CENSUS DATA COLLECTION INTEGRITY QUESTIONED

This year’s census is in danger of not providing the data needed to make good decisions, says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“Whilst we understand and support the excitement of capturing our census data online, our concern is that many people still do not have access to internet while others might not have the capability or capacity to do so,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“The timing of the delivery of access code letters, which indicate that New Zealanders can opt for paper forms presents challenges for our rural communities, given that delivery of mail is taking longer and might only be delivered three days a week.

“The chances of a rural household without internet or with unreliable internet, receiving census paper forms in time for Tuesday, 6 March is slim, and that is concerning.

“RWNZ is doing everything possible to ensure our networks are aware of the new way of doing the Census although surely more thought should have gone in to how the valuable information about the lives and status of New Zealanders would be collected.

“Maybe this year, there could have been a concerted effort to use both electronic collection and paper collection to ensure integrity of the data,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

 

Please contact the National Office for more information.

 

 

National Office

Rural Women New Zealand

 

[email protected]

04 473 5524


 

 

(image source: www.census.govt.nz)

Census Data Collection Integrity Questioned

Monday, February 26, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand have released a media release raising our concerns for how data is being collected in this year's census.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release regarding our involvement to help support communities affected by the M.bovis outbreak. With 38 farms currently infected, and others under movement control, we encourage farmers to contact their local Rural Support Trust and visit MPI’s website for advice and support.

 

Read more about this here.

Read the media release below.

 

RURAL WOMEN NEW ZEALAND OFFERS FULL SUPPORT TO GOVERNMENT

 

  Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has offered their full support to the Government for communities that are affected by the Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) outbreak. This announcement was made in a meeting earlier this week with Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, Minister of Agriculture and Biosecurity Damien O’Connor, and Waikato dairy farmers, then reiterated with industry leaders.

 

“Our rural communities are really hurting in this unprecedented biosecurity outbreak – it is vital they are supported throughout this response, no matter what future plan is decided next week,” says RWNZ National President Fiona Gower.

“From what I saw on Monday and what we are hearing from our members and others in the industry, it is clear that the response to M. bovis is upsetting and we are pleased to have been able to offer our support.

“Since 1925, RWNZ members have been the glue that holds rural communities together and nearly 100 years later we continue by working with Rural Support Trusts, visiting farming families, and offering funding for adverse events.

“The decision to offer our full support comes from recent meetings with industry leaders and the Minister, and from our many years’ experience supporting rural communities.

“We are pleased that RWNZ can continue our tradition of charitable giving and we look forward to working with the Government and industry to ensure rural communities are fully supported through the M. bovis outbreak,” says Ms Gower.

Ends