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RECENT NEWS

Maternity services have come under the spotlight with the announcement that an anonymous group of midwives has sent a complaint alleging that midwifery is at a crisis point to the Health and Disability Commissioner.

The letter is now being handled by the Ministry of Health (as confirmed to the Otago Daily Times newspaper). While the contents of the 33-page letter are not known to the public, Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has concerns in two areas. 

This letter comes at a time when smaller maternity units are being threatened by closure, meaning that women living in rural areas will no longer have a choice in where they give birth and will have to go to larger urban areas away from home and family.

RWNZ can name maternity hospitals in Te Anau, Lumsden and Tutatapere in the South Island and Te Kuiti in the North that are currently under threat of closure. Government and DHB’s will claim that the services are being under-used, but the reality for newly pregnant women when they must make a choice about where they will give birth, is that the uncertainty of a smaller hospital’s future leaves them with no choice than to go to an urban area.

Rural women are already at a disadvantage with their maternity care. During the first three months of pregnancy, the midwife and the mother must come to an agreement over the number of visits made at home once the baby has been born. It is appreciated that distance and time for midwives to travel to rural areas is an issue and that the seven, or more home visits are unlikely to happen with the current level of recompense that midwives receive. Most will agree to one visit with the expectation that the mother will then be able to travel to a clinic for the aftercare that they are entitled to.

In most cases, the arrangement works unless the new mother has had a caesarean birth and is unable to drive for six weeks. Not only is she deprived of essential aftercare, in some cases they can be isolated from other support services and family. There may be further issues when the new mother is a migrant worker, or English is a second language, or where there is a variable income. The demands of seasonal farm work will often play their part too, and it is not always possible for a farmer to stop work over the six week period of midwife aftercare to transport the new mother and baby to appointments.

Government and DHB’s need to accept responsibility for optimum care for new mothers and babies at a time in life when the need for guidance and advice is crucial. The early days of a baby’s life and the ability of the mother to adapt and cope with new demands are crucial for the future health of the baby. Care delivered at this early stage is an investment in the lifetime health of a child.

Whatever the outcome from the letter the midwives have sent, it will be founded on genuine deep concern for the health of mother and babies, and Rural Women New Zealand is hopeful that their concerns will be considered with that knowledge in mind.

Rural Women New Zealand believes that all women regardless of their geographical location deserve equity of maternity services.

Note: Midwives letter referenced in Otago Daily Times, published 29 May 2017.

 

 

Concerns for equity of maternity services in rural areas

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Maternity services have come under the spotlight with the announcement that an anonymous group of midwives has sent a complaint alleging that midwifery is at a crisis point to the Health and Disability Commissioner. Read More

Budget 2017 had several areas of interest for rural, in particular for the farming sector, where there is additional funding for the Ministry of Primary Industries on biosecurity, irrigation, and trade facilitation.

The Budget’s focus on spending on public services, social investment, and infrastructure will also benefit rural people. Changes to tax brackets, Working for Families and Accommodation Supplements targeted at lower and middle income families is also important.

A $4.0 billion infrastructure package includes $812 million capital investment to reinstate the earthquake damaged sections of State Highway 1 from Picton to Christchurch. $548 million is also being invested in the rail network.

Roading infrastructure spending has been given a boost with items such as the Huntly and Hamilton sections of the Waikato Expressway; the Whirokino trestle bridge replacement in Manawatu-Whanganui; the Mt Messenger-Awakino Gorge corridor in Taranaki; and the Motu Bridge replacement in Gisborne.

Tourism infrastructure will receive $44.6 million in operations funding and $41 million in capital to ease pressure on Department of Conservation land and facilities, with an additional $9.7 million capital allocation beyond the four-year period.

Primary industries benefit from an increase of $30.5 million of operating funding to upgrade and modernise the fisheries management system. Setting aside $100 million of under-utilised Crown land to build houses, means less horticultural land is likely to be used for housing.

An additional $59.2 million over four years has been set aside to ensure all road ambulance call outs are double crewed by 2021, by creating 375 new emergency medical and paramedic roles across the country. This will directly benefit a number of rural districts in New Zealand.

Budget 2017 also allocated additional grant funding of $26.7 million over the next three years, plus a capital boost of $63 million towards irrigation projects.

Click here to download RWNZ's full Budget 2017 report written by Craig Matthews, freelance writer and editor.

Budget 2017

Friday, May 26, 2017

Budget 2017 had several areas of interest for rural, in particular for the farming sector, where there is additional funding for the Ministry of Primary Industries on biosecurity, irrigation, and trade facilitation. Read More

The RWNZ Adverse Events and Relief Fund is available to individuals, communities and groups, with a particular emphasis on rural women and children. The fund provides financial assistance to persons or groups, where there is an identified urgent need due to recent adverse events such as drought, fires, floods or earthquakes.

Grants may be awarded as follows:

- To assist families in time of natural disaster.
- To assist the elderly, the young or any family or person for their particular need, in time of natural disaster.
- To assist community groups and organisations in need, in time of natural disaster.

If you know of someone in need, or are in need yourself of financial support due to an adverse event or natural disaster, please complete our application form by clicking on the link below.

CLICK HERE for the  RWNZ Adverse Events Relief Fund Application Form 

 

Rural support agencies include:

The Rural Support Trust 

The Rural Support Trust supports people going through a tough time. They are local rural people that know from experience that severe weather, finances, relationships, and work pressures can all mount up. Contact any time 0800 RURAL HELP. Click here for Rural Support Trust information on events and updates on Hurunui-Kaikoura-Marlborough areas.

DairyNZ: Sharemilkers support http://www.dairynz.co.nz/farm/tactics/support-for-sharemilkers/

Federated Farmers http://www.fedfarm.org.nz/ Ph: 0800 327 646 or drought feedline 0800 376 844.

Doug Avery’s Resilient Farmer http://www.resilientfarmer.co.nz/

Farmstrong http://www.farmstrong.co.nz

 

Other sources of grants include:

RWNZ Community Fund
A fund to provide help to persons or groups . To assist families in time of natural disaster, to assist the elderly, the young or any family or person for their particular need.

Eligibility criteria: Applications by RWNZ members only, but may be made on behalf of another person or group. Applications Considered: At each RWNZ Council meeting. In matters of urgency the President and Finance Chair in consultation may make an immediate grant. Value: Up to $1,000 per grant. Click here for full criteria and application details. 


Donate to RWNZ's Adverse Events Relief Fund

The funds are used for emergency purposes and will also be available to support people in coming months. To donate directly to the fund please deposit money into:
RWNZ Bank Account: 06 0501-0778590-00 ref. earthquake.

 

Adverse Events Relief Fund

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

The RWNZ Adverse Events and Relief Fund is available to individuals, communities and groups, with a particular emphasis on rural women and children. The fund provides financial assistance to persons or groups, where there is an identified urgent need due to recent adverse events such as drought, fires, floods or earthquakes. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand calls for more awareness of farm vehicle safety in New Zealand. Recently, there have been two fatalities from the use of the “side-by-side” ATV vehicles in the South Island. These vehicles have been replacing quad bikes on farm, as they appear to be a safer option to farmers.

"The term ATV is a misnomer, as these are not all-terrain-vehicles, like all vehicles they have their place and they have their limits. The best way to safely use side-by-side vehicles, is to get proper training, and always wear seat belts, even for short journeys” says Fiona Gower, National President of Rural Women New Zealand.

“Operators of all farm vehicles, such as ATVs, quads, two-wheelers, tractors and utes need to know the vehicle’s capabilities and practise safe riding and driving skills. They need to know how to check their vehicle to ensure it is safe to operate. The best way to achieve this is through qualified training instructors."

“The time and cost of a training course is a better option than having an income stream interrupted due to being off work, health bills or in extreme circumstances, funeral costs. There are wider costs to consider, as well as the financial ones, such as physical recovery time, the emotional costs of losing a loved one, or watching them cope with the injuries received from an accident.”

RWNZ understands that vehicles are essential tools on rural properties. RWNZ advises operators to choose the right vehicle for the job ahead, taking into consideration the terrain and the load being carried and the actual work required to complete. We also remind people to wear their seat belt and ensure everyone in the vehicle has their seat belt on.

It is essential to undertake pre-ride checks such as “TCLOC” to ensure vehicles are at a safe standard by checking:
Tyres and wheels (including correct tyre pressure)
Chassis
Lights and electrics
Oil and fuel
Controls.

 

Safety first on farm vehicles

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Rural Women New Zealand calls for more awareness of farm vehicle safety in New Zealand. Recently, there have been two fatalities from the use of the “side-by-side” ATV vehicles in the South Island. These vehicles have been replacing quad bikes on farm, as they appear to be a safer option to farmers. Read More


Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) invites entries from innovative and successful rural businesswomen, in horticulture, agricultural, dairy, tourism or any other rural sectors for this year’s Enterprising Rural Women Awards.

The Awards is a showcase for the success of women operating businesses in rural locations and contributing to their local economy and community. The competition has evolved over the years to promote entrepreneurship and encourage innovation in the use of technology in remote locations. Winners of the Awards have included women lifestyle publishers, honey producers, native nursery operators, physiotherapists and adventure-tourism providers.

Marian Hirst of Bay Blueberries from Hastings, won the Love of the Land Award in 2016, sponsored by Agrisea Ltd. Marian is passionate about producing quality apples and blueberries in an environmentally-friendly and sustainable manner. Bay Blueberries won the 2016 Ballance Farm Environmental Supreme Award for the East Coast Region.

“Being acknowledged with a 'Love of the Land' award in the Enterprising Rural Women Awards has given me the opportunity to connect with inspirational business women throughout New Zealand,” says Marian Hirst.

“I have made friends, been inspired, challenged and encouraged by a strong and supportive local network of Rural Women New Zealand members, who truly understand what it means for me to be a woman in the business of horticulture.”


The four Awards for 2017: 

1.Emerging Enterprising Rural Woman Award

2.Innovative Enterprising Rural Woman Award

3.Entrepreneurial Enterprising Rural Woman Award

4.Supreme Award: Enterprising Rural Woman Achievement Award for standout business success in the rural sector.

Entry forms can be downloaded here. Entries close 31 August 2017.

Pictured above is ANZ Private's Associate Director Grant Rae with Amy Dibley, who won the Innovative Enterprising Rural Women Award and the Supreme Award for her business Physio Direct. 

Enterprising Rural Women Awards 2017

Wednesday, May 10, 2017


Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) invites entries from innovative and successful rural businesswomen, in horticulture, agricultural, dairy, tourism or any other rural sectors for this year’s Enterprising Rural Women Awards.

The Awards is a showcase for the success of women operating businesses in rural locations and contributing to their local economy and community. The competition has evolved over the years to promote entrepreneurship and encourage innovation in the use of technology in remote locations. Winners of the Awards have included women lifestyle publishers, honey producers, native nursery operators, physiotherapists and adventure-tourism providers.

Marian Hirst of Bay Blueberries from Hastings, won the Love of the Land Award in 2016, sponsored by Agrisea Ltd. Marian is passionate about producing quality apples and blueberries in an environmentally-friendly and sustainable manner. Bay Blueberries won the 2016 Ballance Farm Environmental Supreme Award for the East Coast Region.

“Being acknowledged with a 'Love of the Land' award in the Enterprising Rural Women Awards has given me the opportunity to connect with inspirational business women throughout New Zealand,” says Marian Hirst.

“I have made friends, been inspired, challenged and encouraged by a strong and supportive local network of Rural Women New Zealand members, who truly understand what it means for me to be a woman in the business of horticulture.”


 Read More

Communities across New Zealand will be calling on drivers to #SlowDown as part of UN Global Road Safety Week 2017 (8-14 May), to help save lives on NZ roads.

One in three fatal crashes in New Zealand involves someone driving too fast [1].

A survey conducted by Brake, the road safety charity shows 78% of people are worried about being hit when out walking or cycling in their area, and 60% say they worry about fast traffic in their community [2].

To mark Road Safety Week, Brake, the road safety charity, Safekids Aotearoa, Ministry of Transport, NZ Police, NZ Transport Agency, Auckland Transport, the Yellow Ribbon Road Safety Alliance, Rural Women New Zealand and other road safety organisations are calling on everyone to pledge to #SlowDown, in line with the UN theme for the Week. They will particularly be reminding drivers to keep well below speed limits around schools and in communities, and to remember the 20km/h limit for passing a school bus. Road Safety Week is kindly sponsored by QBE Insurance.

Across New Zealand more than 700 schools, kindergartens, companies and communities are getting involved in the Week by holding a #SlowDown event, or other awareness-raising activity to get the message across about the horror of road crashes and the part we can all play in making communities safer. (See details below of how to find out what’s happening in your area.)

New Zealand’s road safety strategy, Safer Journeys, includes safe speeds as one of the four pillars, and Brake will be highlighting the difference that even a small increase in speed can make to the outcome of a crash.

Brake and Safekids Aotearoa are teaming up with Dr Michelle Dickinson (aka Nanogirl), Engineer at the University of Auckland and students from Meadowbank School in a video explaining the science of speed, reaction times and stopping distances. (The video will be released on Monday 8 May, with a link available in an updated version of this release.)

Individuals and organisations will be using the official Road Safety Week signboard to make their pledge to #SlowDown and share on social media. School children around the country will be making posters to be displayed outside their school, or creating banners and going on a walk in their community reminding drivers to #SlowDown and look out for kids.

The Yellow Ribbon Road Safety Alliance, a group of organisations committed to raising awareness of road trauma in New Zealand, is promoting use of the colour yellow to highlight road safety and show a personal commitment to safer roads, by distributing yellow ribbons and reaching out to government and businesses to light buildings in yellow during Road Safety Week.

This is the sixth Road Safety Week New Zealand coordinated by Brake in collaboration with our partners, and the fourth UN Global Road Safety Week. Figures from the Ministry of Transport 2015 (the latest available) show that:

  • Speeding was a contributing factor in 32% of road deaths, with 101 people killed in speed-related crashes [3].
  • More than half those deaths were children and young people (5 children aged 0-14 and 49 young people aged 15-19) [4].
  • Speeding was a contributing factor in 410 (21%) serious injury crashes, resulting in 496 seriously injured people [5].
  • The total social cost of crashes involving drivers speeding was about $940 million, approximately 25% of the social cost for all injury crashes that year [6].
  • Speeding was a contributing factor in 34% of urban fatal crashes and 30% of open road fatal crashes between 2013-2015 [7].

Speeding around schools is particularly dangerous as it puts children, who are unable to effectively judge vehicle speeds, in danger [8]. Police enforcement figures show the number of speeding offences near schools:

  • In 2016, there were over 6,300 officer issued speed notices, and almost 75,000 speed camera notices for speed offences near schools. They accounted for 9.3% of all speed notices in 2016 [9].

 

Members of the public can show their support for Road Safety Week by:

 

Caroline Perry, Brake’s NZ director, said: "When drivers use roads without care for others the consequences can be tragic and horrific – people killed and badly injured, lives ruined forever, because of a moment of inattention, impatience or a bad decision. At Brake we witness the suffering that results, through our work supporting people affected by road death and injury. Speed is a factor in all crashes. Whilst it might not have caused the crash, it will help determine the outcome. Even small increases in speed can mean the difference between life and death. That's why, this Road Safety Week, we’re asking drivers to pledge to #SlowDown for someone. Whether it’s your family, friends, community, or yourself, reduce your speed and help make our roads safer."

 

Dr Mike Shepherd, Director of Starship Child Health - Medical and Community and Starship Safekids Aotearoa spokesperson, said: “Every year 22 children are killed, and 294 are hospitalised with serious injuries because of a road traffic crash in New Zealand. Speed is at the core of this child injury epidemic that is affecting communities and families across NZ and around the world. A concerted effort between the Government, organisations and communities is needed to stop our children from dying in NZ roads due to speed. Safekids and the World Health Organisation advocate for simple steps to manage speed: introducing more traffic calming features such as speed bumps, traffic signs, road markings and low-speed zones; establishing and enforcing lower speed limits, especially in school zones; install technologies in vehicles such as automatic emergency breaking (AEB); and most important of all, make drivers realise that speed kills.”

Harry Wilson, Director safety and environment, NZ Transport Agency said: “Everyone makes mistakes when driving, but a simple mistake doesn’t need to result in loss of life or limb. The faster you drive, the more likely you are to crash, and speed affects the outcome of every crash. Road Safety Week is a timely reminder for all of us to slow down and keep safe on the roads.”

Superintendent Steve Greally, National Road Policing Manager, NZ Police said: “We are all human, so mistakes on the road are going to happen. Sure – most of the time when we drive nothing happens, but how well prepared are we if something does? While you might not be at fault, the speed you choose to drive at determines the outcome of any crash.Safe speeds are essential for this reason, you can’t control the behaviour of other road users but you can control your own.As a safe driver, you’ll have to look out for changes in traffic, road and weather conditions, and reduce your speed accordingly. Also remember to look out for our vulnerable road users, like cyclists, pedestrians and motorcyclists. Increased speed, regardless of vehicle type, puts vulnerable road users at greater risk. For them, even a small reduction in vehicle speed could save their life.”

 

Maria Lovelock, Programme Manager of Road Safety Education (RSE) and member of the Yellow Ribbon Road Safety Alliance said: “The Alliance believes that together we can all make a difference and change our road safety culture across New Zealand. 328 lives were lost last year as we got to our jobs, travel and families. The Yellow Ribbon symbolises getting home safely. As a society we need to change our mindsets about accepting a toll for using our roads and all pull together to drive more carefully and socially. We would like to encourage all New Zealanders to wear yellow this week in support of this and take a moment to think about one situation while driving where you could pledge to slow down.”

 

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) National President, Fiona Gower said: “With school buses back on the roads, we’re reminding drivers to obey the 20km/h speed limit. It is very important in all communities, particularly in rural areas, that drivers are aware of the speed rule and drive at a safe speed limit of 20km/h when passing a stopped school bus.”

 

Kathryn King, Walking Cycling and Safety Manager at Auckland Transport said: “Auckland Transport is supporting Brake with Road Safety Week by encouraging schools to get involved. Our team are looking forward to assisting schools with their road safety activities during the week.”

Bill Donovan, General Manager – New Zealand Operations at QBE Insurance said: “At QBE, we firmly believe we have a responsibility to be a good corporate citizen in the communities in which we operate. This is one of the reasons that we’ve supported Brake and Road Safety Week for six years. It’s an initiative to encourage commitment - both personal and corporate - to road safety, and we are very pleased to be part of this community initiative.”

 

Filming, photo and interview opportunities

Activities are taking place around the country throughout Road Safety Week, with some open to media to attend for interviews, filming and photos.

View our list of selected activities taking place in Road Safety Week. (These will continue to be added to prior to, and throughout, Road Safety Week).

To find out more, or attend activities in your area, contact Caroline Perry on 021 407 953 or [email protected].

In Auckland, media are invited to attend and conduct filming, interviews and take photographs at:

Tuesday 9 May, 10.30am, Royal Oak Intermediate School

Students at the school will be measuring out stopping distances at different speeds, highlighting the importance of slowing down in communities.

Students, Brake and other road safety representatives will hold a photo call to share #SlowDown messages on Road Safety Week signboards.

Students will display #SlowDown posters as part of their Road Safety Week competition.

There will be an assembly teaching the students about road safety with their community constable, Brake, Safekids and others.

Wednesday 10 May, 9.30am-2pm, Trusts Arena, Henderson

A RYDA road safety programme is taking place with Rutherford College, where Year 12 students will learn about a number of road safety issues, including speed, through a series of workshops. Students will all be given a Yellow Ribbon pin to wear and asked to pledge to slow down for one situation they may be faced with whether that’s personally driving or speaking up as a passenger. Rutherford College will also be presented with a special certificate to celebrate the 500,000th student to have attended RYDA since it started 15 years ago in Australia and New Zealand

Friday 12 May, 8am, Sunnybrae Normal School

The school is holding a Bright Walk to school. Students will dress brightly to remind drivers to #SlowDown and look out for children on foot, bike and scooter. The students will be carrying signboards and the Road Safety Week banner with #SlowDown messages.

Case studies

Karen Gibbons, whose son Ryan, 19, was killed in a crash north of Auckland, is sharing her story as part of Road Safety Week.

We also have a number of other families affected by road crashes around the country that are available for interview. To arrange interviews with any of our volunteers, please contact Brake on the details below.

Facts on speed

Driving is the most dangerous thing most of us do on a regular basis: you're operating a potentially dangerous machine in an unpredictable, public environment, so it requires full concentration at all times.

 

Speed is a critical factor in all road crashes and casualties. It is estimated that for every 1mph (2km/h) reduction in average speeds, crash rates fall by an average of 5% [10].

 

See Brake’s stopping distances illustration.

See Brake’s website for speed facts.

Key advice to help you #SlowDown

  • On all roads, keep well below speed limits – it’s a limit not a target.
  • Slow down in school zones, around road works, and in communities at all times.
  • Passing school buses: either way its 20km/h.
  • Come to a complete stop at intersections and double check for children.
  • Slow down and double check for people at pedestrian crossings, particularly in school zones.

See Brake’s driver advice on speed.

To find out more or take part in Road Safety Week, go to www.roadsafetyweek.org.nz.

For media queries, or to arrange interviews with Brake, volunteers, or any supporters, contact Caroline Perry on 021 407 953 or [email protected] .

 

Notes for editors:

Brake
Brake is an international road safety charity. Its New Zealand division promotes road safety and campaigns against the carnage on New Zealand roads. It is also fundraising to improve support for families bereaved and injured in road crashes. To support Brake, go to www.brake.org.nz. Support books for children and adults bereaved in road crashes are available for free to families by contacting Brake on [email protected] or 021 407 953.

Brake was founded in the UK in 1995, and now has domestic operations in the UK and New Zealand, and works globally to promote action on road safety.

Road crashes are not accidents; they are devastating and preventable events, not chance mishaps. Calling them accidents undermines work to make roads safer, and can cause insult to families whose lives have been torn apart by needless casualties.

 

QBE 

QBE Insurance has been operating in New Zealand since 1890 and is part of the QBE Insurance Group, one of the world's top 20 general insurance and reinsurance companies.

 

QBE New Zealand offers a comprehensive range of quality business insurance products to cover enterprises of all sizes; from small owner operators to large corporations.

 

Underwriting risk in the corporate, commercial and professional insurance sectors, QBE provides all classes of business insurance including: Liability, Property, Contract Works & Engineering, Marine, Motor, Trade Credit and Accident & Health.

 

Talk to your broker about QBE Insurance.

 

End notes:

[1] Speed: crash facts, Ministry of Transport, 2016

[2]Brake’s family safety survey, 370 respondents, 2017

[3] Speed: crash facts, Ministry of Transport, 2016

[4] ibid

[5] ibid

[6] ibid

[7] ibid

[8] Traffic at 30mph is too fast for children’s visual capabilities, University of Royal Holloway, London, 2010

[9] Figures from NZ Police, 2016

[10] Speed, Speed Limits and Accidents, Transport Research Laboratory, 1994

 

Slow down for Road Safety Week 2017

Monday, May 08, 2017

Communities across New Zealand will be calling on drivers to #SlowDown as part of UN Global Road Safety Week 2017 (8-14 May), to help save lives on NZ roads. Read More

Duck shooting season opened on Saturday 6 May and Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) wishes all duck hunters a safe and successful shoot this season.

Duck shooting season is an opportunity to get outdoors and catch up with fellow hunters. To avoid injuries or fatalities RWNZ reminds shooters to be aware of their responsibilities towards safe handling and security of the firearms before, during and after the shoot.

“We want to see everyone home safely this season and that includes educating children on being safe around firearms,” says Fiona Gower, RWNZ National President.

"Safety also includes wearing warm clothing and correct protective gear such as earmuffs. Shotguns fire at a decibel rating of 170dB which causes instant hearing loss to all those standing close by. Earmuffs or earplugs may eliminate permanent damage.”

The seven rules of the Firearms Safety Code should always be observed to ensure hunters handle firearms safely, and keep themselves and others from harm.

The regulations for game bird shooting may have changed since last season. RWNZ recommends duck shooters check with the Department of Conservation, Fish and Game New Zealand and private landowners to confirm legal game bird hunting areas and game restrictions for that region.

THE FIREARMS SAFETY CODE:

1. Treat every firearm as loaded

Check every firearm yourself.

Pass or accept only an open or unloaded firearm.

2. Always point firearms in a safe direction

Loaded or unloaded, always point the muzzle in a safe direction.

3. Load a firearm only when ready to use

Load the magazine only when you reach your shooting area.

Load the chamber only when ready to shoot.

Completely unload before leaving the shooting area.

4. Identify your target beyond all doubt

Movement, colour, sound and shape can all deceive you.

Assume colour, shape, sound, and shape to be human until proven otherwise.

5. Check your firing zone

THINK! What may happen if you miss your target? What might you hit between you and the target or beyond?

Do not fire when you know others are in your firing zone.

6. Store firearms and ammunition safely

When not in use, lock away the bolt, firearm and ammunition separately.

Never leave firearms in a vehicle that is unattended.

7. Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

Good judgement is the key to safe use of firearms.

Safety first for duck shooting season

Friday, May 05, 2017

Duck shooting season opened on Saturday 6 May and Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) wishes all duck hunters a safe and successful shoot this season. Read More

Read All NewsRecent news


 

WINNERS OF THE NZ GUILD OF AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISTS AND COMMUNICATORS ANNOUNCED

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) presented two awards at the 60th New Zealand Guild of Agricultural Journalists and Communicators Awards (Guild's).

“RWNZ believes that the Guild’s are an important opportunity to recognise the talent which connects and strengthens New Zealand’s rural communities,” says National Chair, Penny Mudford.

“As an organisation, we sponsored two awards at this year’s Guilds – the Rural Connectivity Award and the RWNZ Journalism Award.

“RWNZ established the Rural Connectivity Award to recognise the importance of connectivity to rural communities and agri-businesses in rural areas, celebrating journalism that helps raise awareness about the issues and benefits of rural connectivity.

“This year, Gerald Piddock of Stuff NZ wins the Rural Connectivity Award for his work on how strengthening connections in rural communities is a way of supporting and attracting new farmers to the industry.

“The Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award was established to recognise the important contribution women make (and have always made) in the rural community, either through their role in the farming sector or to the general rural environment, in its broadest interpretation.

“Carol Stiles of Radio New Zealand’s Country Life Programme, wins the Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award 2018 for her work on broadcasts which highlighted how one women’s dream of sheep farming came to fruition and another who is changing the lives of retired farm dogs.

“RWNZ is proud to be involved with the Guild’s and look forward to hearing and seeing more from the entrants and winners who grow, connect and support our rural communities,” says Ms Mudford.

Ends

For more information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:

Rural Women New Zealand

National Office

[email protected]

 

 

 

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria. 

 

 

RURAL SCHOOL BUS SERVICE REVIEW NEEDED

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is calling for a review of the school bus eligibility criteria, particularly in the rural areas.

“The safest way for children to get to school in rural New Zealand is by bus, however, the current eligibility criteria for the service means that children are being put in dangerous situations,” says Education Portfolio Convenor and Board Member, Sue Higgins.

“If children live within two kilometres of a rural school they are not eligible for the local bus service where there is one, and are forced to walk or cycle on roads with no shoulders, often used by logging trucks, stock trucks and milk tankers, making it treacherous for our children.

“RWNZ understands that parents are responsible for ensuring their children go to school, however, the rural bus is vital for farming families who have both a busy working life and distance, for those who live further away, to contend with.

“A review of the criteria applied to children’s eligibility for their local rural school bus service is needed – school by school.

“It’s time the Government showed leadership on keeping our rural children safe on their journey to and from school,” says Mrs Higgins.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 

Rural school bus service review needed.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria.  Read More

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit. 

 

MEDIA RELEASE

16 August 2018
For immediate release

 

RURAL MATERNITY CARE IN CRISIS

The downgrading of maternity care in rural Otago and Southland will be catastrophic says Rural Women New Zealand(RWNZ).

“On top of the news that Lumsden’s birthing unit has been downgraded to a pre- and post-natal care unit, RWNZ understands that Wanaka has lost its bid to have a primary birthing unit and this does not bode well for rural communities,” says Board Member and Health Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Whilst RWNZ is somewhat pleased that Lumsden will retain care facilities for any woman with pre- and post-natal needs, women ready to give birth will need to travel at least 50 kilometres to the nearest delivery suite.

“Wanaka is expecting 200 births this coming year and there will be no primary birthing unit, and like Lumsden, will become a hub.

“The Otago-Southland region has a huge hinterland with many young parents who are choosing to have families and raise them in this wonderful part of the world and are at risk due to distance from the maternity care they are entitled to.

"No consideration has been given to those parents who have needed the services provided at Lumsden and already travelling up to two hours, now having an extra 50 kilometres added.

“When assessing maternity needs there is always two lives to consider, the mother and the child, and its outrageous that at the time in their lives when they should be close to their families they are not able to be, due to poor decision-making.

“It is not acceptable that pregnant women in rural areas of the South Island are now miles away from anywhere that can support them to have safe births, something a rural impact analysis would have highlighted.

“It’s time the Government and DHB ensured rural communities have the same access to maternity care as urban communities expect,” says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

For more information, please contact National Office.

[email protected]

04 473 5524

 

 

 

 

 

Rural maternity care in crisis

Thursday, August 16, 2018

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit.  Read More

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

New Zealand's farming women celebrating 125 years on

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

 

Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

 

 

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards will be held on the evening of Tuesday, 20 November 2018 in Wellington in the Banquet Hall at Parliament.

A review of the Enterprising Rural Women Awards has been completed by the RWNZ Board with feedback from members and participants, external advice, and the awards partners.

The awards have been renamed the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards and NZI is the Premier Partner. The categories have been broadened, the application process has been updated and the judging criteria strengthened.

 

The NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards give an outstanding opportunity to showcase your business. The event attracts extensive media coverage and promotional opportunities. All winners will receive a membership of Rural Women New Zealand for one year. All category winners will each receive $1000 in prize money and a trophy, and the Supreme Winner will receive a further $1000 in prize money.

 

“Winning the Supreme Award was such an amazing result. I am proud of my achievements and honoured to be surrounded by such inspiring, talented and strong women,”

- Debra Cruickshank of Tannacrieff Wines, Supreme winner 2017.

 

 

You can download the entry forms below, which contain information regarding entry criteria and conditions of entry. The PDF version can be downloaded, printed, filled out and scanned or posted to National Office. The Word.doc available can be electronically filled out using Microsoft Word and sent as an attachment to National Office. Please send entry forms to [email protected].

First stage entry forms (13, June – 1, August) PDF

First stage entry forms (13, June – 1, August) Word.doc


The categories for the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards 2018 are:

  • Emerging business: Awarded to a business starting out in its journey and achieving exceptional results. Open to businesses that have been running from 2 – 5 years.
  • Love of the Land: Harnessing the potential of New Zealand’s land, environment or products of the land, to create a successful business enterprise.
  • Creative Arts: A business specialising in the creative arts working in a rural environment or using rural materials.
  • Innovation: An enterprise that challenges the status quo to bring something new and innovative to the market or utilising rural resources in an innovative way.
  • Rural Champion: A person or business who champions the rural sector or a rural enterprise – an outstanding contributor who goes above and beyond the normal in their support rural enterprise. Open to anybody.
 

A Supreme winner will be chosen from all category finalists, who has shown excellence and outstanding achievement across all entry criteria.

 

Please find following the relevant dates for entries:

  • Wednesday, 13 June - Launch of awards at National Fieldays, entries open
  • Wednesday, 1 August - Entries close, first round judging starts
  • Friday, 31 August - First round judging complete
  • Saturday, 1 September - First stage finalists contacted and second round entries open
  • Sunday, 30 September - Second stage entries close
  • Monday, 1 October - Second stage judging begins.
  • Tuesday, 20 November - NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards (winners announced).

Please read the media release launching the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards here:

If you are interested in supporting the awards as a category partner, please contact [email protected].

NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards

Wednesday, October 03, 2018

  Read More