welcome back, !

 

RECENT NEWS

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 Read More

 


 

Suffrage 125 has brought together a group of women around Gore, including RWNZ, to prepare a range of events, both to celebrate the 1893 achievement of women gaining the right to vote, and to remind and educate a modern generation of what went before and how they are reaping the benefits. 

Celebrations to date have included re-enactments and displays, ‘Cuppa with a Coppa’, joining with women in police and emergency services and will continue through to December with exhibitions, talks and displays at Gore’s renowned Eastern Southland Gallery.

We are proud to screen ‘She Shears’ in Gore as part of the Suffrage Celebrations!On Sunday September 23rd it is part of a trio of women-centric movies, along with ’What Really Happened: Votes for Women’ and ‘The Divine Order’ about Swiss women who didn’t get the vote till 1971!

Wool will be prominent that day, in it’s many uses, including a display of award winning garments from Hokonui Fashion Awards and Wool On, created by Gore women, Viv Tamblyn and her daughter Andre Johnston.

Remembering and celebrating women, past, present and future.

 

 

 

Jeanette McIntyre MBE

Mid-East Southland RWNZ


 

 

Celebrating Suffrage125 in mid-East Southland

Wednesday, September 19, 2018

  Read More

Suffrage125 - Women in the Primary Sector

 

Florence Polson


This year we are celebrating 125 years of suffrage with Ministry for Primary Industries by profiling women in the primary sector. Florence Polson was the founder and first President of what was then known as the Women's Division of the New Zealand Farmers Union (now Rural Women New Zealand).

 

Born in 1877 Florence was born in Australia, and later moved to a small farm near Whanganui after marrying William John Polson in 1910. After William was elected President of the New Zealand Farmers's Union, Florence started to campaign for the needs of rural women and eventually started the Women's Division of NZFU in 1925, and was elected President of the division the same year.

 

“The Women’s Division is of distinct benefit to the community because of awakened interest in community conditions and the possibility, by organized efforts, to improve those conditions”, - Florence Polson.#Suffrage125 Ministry for Women, New Zealand

 

Loshni Manikam


Rural Women New Zealand Member Loshni Manikam is a woman who has contributed significantly to New Zealand’s primary sector. Earlier this year, she was named Fonterra Dairy Woman of the Year for her dedication to growing leadership among farming communities. 


 What do you do in the primary sector?

Loshni: I am a leadership coach and facilitator working with women in the primary sector to overcome the barriers (internal and external) that get in the way of them succeeding.

Why is this important to you and to New Zealand?

The primary sector is an integral part of NZ's economy, and women make up 50% of that sector. If we can support women to succeed, there is a positive ripple impact on their families, businesses, communities, sector, and New Zealand.

What’s your view about women in primary sector – (if need a prompt – can you tell me about how far we’ve come and how far we have yet to go)

We have come a long way in minimising and managing the external barriers to women succeeding in the Primary Sector - there are more opportunities and a greater appreciation of what we bring to the table. I believe that the biggest gains we can now make will come from us managing our internal barriers.

 

 

 

Celebrating Suffrage125 with women in the primary sector

Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Suffrage125 - Women in the Primary Sector
 Read More

 

The Rural Women New Zealand Summit 2018 will be a two day event, held at Parliament in Wellington on Tuesday, 20 and Wednesday, 21 November.

 

The Summit will include a day of RWNZ business, the NZI Rural Women New Zealand Business Awards, and Day Two of workshops. For more details, prices and registration, download registration forms here

Please read below information about the guest speakers and hosts that will be joining us at the RWNZ Summit 2018. 

 

We look forward to hosting you at the Summit and will be providing more details of the programme as they come available. 

 

Hon Tracey Martin - Parliament Host


Hon Martin was first elected to Parliament as a New Zealand First list MP based in Warkworth, in 2011. A great believer in giving back to the community, Tracey spent the majority of her pre-parliament time on parent based fundraising and volunteer committees, while she raised three children with her husband Ben. Tracey is the Minister of Children, Seniors, and Internal Affairs, and is the Associate Minister of Education.
You can read more here.

 
 

Jenny Marcroft MP - Parliament Host


New Zealand First List MP living in Matakana. Spokesperson for Health, Broadcasting, Human Rights, ACC, Conservation and Environment.

Ms Marcroft was elected to Parliament in September 2017, as a New Zealand First list MP based at Matakana, in Rodney district. She stood in the Tamaki electorate and was placed ninth on New Zealand First's party list.

She is a former broadcaster with 30 years’ experience working across a range of New Zealand media outlets and is a passionate defender of the role of public broadcasting in an ever-changing media landscape.
Ms Marcroft is a member of the Maori Affairs and Environment select committees.
You can read more here.

 

Ambassador Scott Brown - NZI RWNZ Business Awards Guest Speaker


Ambassador Scott Brown presented credentials to the Governor-General of New Zealand to become U.S. Ambassador to New Zealand on June 28, 2017.

Ambassador Brown is a prominent U.S. political leader, attorney, and National Guardsman with a long history of public service.

In 2010, Ambassador Brown was elected to the U.S. Senate, representing the state of Massachusetts. During his time in the U.S. Senate, he was known as the most bipartisan Senator, and served as the ranking member on the Armed Services Committee and Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. He also held committee assignments on Veteran and Small Business affairs. As an elected official, he worked extensively to keep children and families safe. He served as Massachusetts State Representative for the 9th Norfolk District for seven years and as State Senator for the Norfolk, Bristol, and Middlesex District for five.

Read more here.

 

 
 

Sarah Trotman - Breakfast of Champions Guest Speaker


Sarah Trotman ONZM is a respected business and community leader, a Trustee and Director and a celebrant.

Founder of Women’s Voices, Sarah has run her own businesses for 18 years and been the driving force behind many major initiatives for New Zealand’s business sector.
She was Chief Executive of Business Mentors New Zealand, supervising the mentoring of almost 5000 small businesses annually. She is a former Trustee of the Sir Peter Blake Trust and Leadership New Zealand, and is a member of Be.Accessible’s Fab 50 Network. Sarah helped establish the Lifewise Big Sleepout fundraising event to support people out of homelessness, and has mentored young women under the YWCA Future Leaders Programme.

Sarah will speak on her leadership experience with a particular focus on being a strong advocate for the advancement of women and girls.

Rural Women New Zealand Summit 2018

Friday, September 07, 2018

 Read More

From the Sheep’s Back to the Sharp End of Fashion… WoolOn Wows the Crowd in Central Otago

(Pictured above: National President Fiona Gower, Chief Executive Officer Penelope England, Region 1 Area Chair Gill Naylor, Board Member Margaret Pittaway.)

 

Fashion garments entered at the recent Rural Women New Zealand WoolOn Awards in Alexandra sparked huge admiration for both their designers and the raw material they were created with.

“I’m in awe of the talent that is out there, the creativity of those designers and what they made…how they turned an incredible wool product into the most amazing garments”, Rural Women New Zealand National President Fiona Gower, said.

 

Andre Johnston from Gore collected the $5000 Supreme Award with a cross-stitched dress entitled ‘For the Love of Spring’.Johnston, who has been designing for twenty years, said the one-shouldered dress had taken “two to three hundred” hours to make. Her mother, Viv Tamblyn, last year’s Supreme winner, won the Peter Lyon Shearing Streetwear category.

 

The event, opened by the Hon. Damien O’Connor, Minister of Agriculture, has blossomed over recent years into a showcase for contemporary wool fashion. Entries, which must be at least 75% wool, are judged over eight categories.

 

Head judge Simon Swale of Dunedin said Johnston’s piece was contemporary and modern, while using traditional craft.

“It was very clever, it played to the traditional but the work looked almost digital. There was nothing else like it.”

Swale, senior lecturer at Otago Polytechnic School of Design, said the entries overall were “bigger, bolder and more ambitious”.

Auckland-based judge Cushla Reed of Minx shoes, commended entrants, many of whom have been crafting wool for decades to gain the skills required.

“The felting category in particular actually blew me away. How they took that traditional look and made it modern.”

 

Fifty-four garments were on show in an industrial warehouse, transformed for two nights into a glitzy fashion venue. Tickets had sold out months prior for the Saturday event, and nearly 800 people attended over the weekend, co-chairperson Leonie Williamson said.

Tweed, crocheting and merino wool mesh came together in the winning Collections Category entry judges described as ‘colonial cool’. Becs Calder from Omakau kept her stunning design true to Central Otago right down to the buttons, fashioned from the horns of a merino ram.

New categories for novice designers and wool accessories had attracted good entries, boding well for the future of the event, Mrs Williamson said.

 

Tania Irons bold interpretation of her home province, Central Otago, going from drought to lush green after rain was a crowd pleaser, taking out the novice section.

Both the Avant Garde and Special Occasion categories were won by Napier designer Laurel Judd, a seasoned competitor who first entered WoolOn in 2006. Her machine-knitted merino lace gown complete with bejewelled looking glass was described by the judges as “a real life fairytale”.

 

Ms Gower said wool remained the backbone of many rural communities in New Zealand and she believed it had a positive future as a remarkably versatile, sustainable product.

“To see it shown in such an incredible light is hugely positive. I have great faith in what we can do with wool and shows like this help get the word out there.”

 

The WoolOn Organising Committee could be very proud of their event, she said, as could local businesses who had supported it through sponsorship.

“We are very pleased to be a part of it and we loved the show.”

 

 

Results: Supreme Award: For the Love of Spring, Andre Johnston, Gore Streetwear: Perfection in Pink by Viv Tamblyn, Gore, Handcrafted: For the Love of Spring, Andre Johnston, Gore, Felted: In the Pink, Heather Kerr, Wanaka, Highly Commended, Circle of Life, Maureen Mckenzie, Alexandra, Novice: Let it Rain, Tania Irons, Becks, Highly Commended Nifty Chic, Beverly Baker, Alexandra, Collections: Tweedle Dee, Becs Calder, Omakau, Special Occasions: Barcelona, Laurel Judd, Napier, Avante Garde: Mirror Image, Laurel Judd, Napier, Accessories: Diamond Herringbone, Sue Mclean, Oamaru, Highly Commended Autumn Warmth, Gillian Parkinson, Roxburgh, Under 23 Award, Expression of Tartan, Neesha Johnston, Havelock.

 

WoolOn Creative Fashion Event 2018

Friday, August 31, 2018
 Read More

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria. 

 

 

RURAL SCHOOL BUS SERVICE REVIEW NEEDED

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is calling for a review of the school bus eligibility criteria, particularly in the rural areas.

“The safest way for children to get to school in rural New Zealand is by bus, however, the current eligibility criteria for the service means that children are being put in dangerous situations,” says Education Portfolio Convenor and Board Member, Sue Higgins.

“If children live within two kilometres of a rural school they are not eligible for the local bus service where there is one, and are forced to walk or cycle on roads with no shoulders, often used by logging trucks, stock trucks and milk tankers, making it treacherous for our children.

“RWNZ understands that parents are responsible for ensuring their children go to school, however, the rural bus is vital for farming families who have both a busy working life and distance, for those who live further away, to contend with.

“A review of the criteria applied to children’s eligibility for their local rural school bus service is needed – school by school.

“It’s time the Government showed leadership on keeping our rural children safe on their journey to and from school,” says Mrs Higgins.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 

Rural school bus service review needed.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the Government's announcement of the Small Business Council. 

Find relevant media about the announcement here

 

 

GOVERNMENT NEEDS TO DO SMALL BUSINESS WITH US NOT FOR US

The new Small Business Council announced by the Government does not fully represent small business says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“While the Minister of Small Business, Hon Stuart Nash, has good intentions with the recent announcement of the Small Business Council, he misses the mark with its membership,” says National Finance Chair and Business Portfolio Convenor Rachael Dean.

“The Government has missed a huge opportunity to work with the rural small business community, instead, opting to work for us, which leaves it open to missing out on real, lived experiences and therefore solid advice and recommendations that will make a difference to the backbone of the New Zealand economy.

“The rural sector is made up of small businesses, many of them owned or partly owned by rural women, yet hands-on rural women in small business are missing from the Small Business Council.

“A quick read through the Terms of Reference shows no reference to the rural sector at all and a word search reveals that rural is not mentioned at all.

“The Small Business Council should include at least one person who is a hands-on small business owner with experience in the rural sector to ensure that for once, their voice is actually heard.

“Experience shows that merely being involved in a consultative process is a waste of time – in order of voices truly to be heard, they need to be at the table.

“RWNZ hopes that the Small Business Council at the very least carries out both a gender impact analysis and a rural impact analysis when developing the Small Business Strategy as per the Terms of Reference.

“The Government needs to work with the small business community, especially with the rural small business community and the women that work within it, to really make a difference,” says Ms Dean.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]

 

Government needs to do small business with us, not for us.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the Government's announcement of the Small Business Council.  Read More

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit. 

 

MEDIA RELEASE

16 August 2018
For immediate release

 

RURAL MATERNITY CARE IN CRISIS

The downgrading of maternity care in rural Otago and Southland will be catastrophic says Rural Women New Zealand(RWNZ).

“On top of the news that Lumsden’s birthing unit has been downgraded to a pre- and post-natal care unit, RWNZ understands that Wanaka has lost its bid to have a primary birthing unit and this does not bode well for rural communities,” says Board Member and Health Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Whilst RWNZ is somewhat pleased that Lumsden will retain care facilities for any woman with pre- and post-natal needs, women ready to give birth will need to travel at least 50 kilometres to the nearest delivery suite.

“Wanaka is expecting 200 births this coming year and there will be no primary birthing unit, and like Lumsden, will become a hub.

“The Otago-Southland region has a huge hinterland with many young parents who are choosing to have families and raise them in this wonderful part of the world and are at risk due to distance from the maternity care they are entitled to.

"No consideration has been given to those parents who have needed the services provided at Lumsden and already travelling up to two hours, now having an extra 50 kilometres added.

“When assessing maternity needs there is always two lives to consider, the mother and the child, and its outrageous that at the time in their lives when they should be close to their families they are not able to be, due to poor decision-making.

“It is not acceptable that pregnant women in rural areas of the South Island are now miles away from anywhere that can support them to have safe births, something a rural impact analysis would have highlighted.

“It’s time the Government and DHB ensured rural communities have the same access to maternity care as urban communities expect,” says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

For more information, please contact National Office.

[email protected]

04 473 5524

 

 

 

 

 

Rural maternity care in crisis

Thursday, August 16, 2018

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit.  Read More

 

Rural Women New Zealand would like to congratulate Alison Van Wyk for her appointment as CEO of Access Community Health. 

 


 

Alison has a background in nursing and possesses sales, marketing and management experience within the pharmaceutical, medical device and healthcare supply chain markets both within New Zealand and internationally. Instrumental in establishing professional programmes of clinical care and advice in pharmacy and the reclassification of medicines for Green Cross Health, Alison has taken a leadership role in advocacy for pharmacy and government relations within the health industry.

Alison commenced her new role effective 18 June 2018.


 

National Office welcome on board three new members to our team. Maree Myers will be working as PA to the Board and Chief Executive Officer, and Katie and Mehreen have come to us from the United States as policy interns for an eight week period. We look to working with them.

 

Maree Myers


 

Assistant to the RWNZ Board and Chief Executive Officer

Maree has worked at Parliament for five different political parties including Labour, Progressive, National, Maori and NZ First.During this time, she was in six Minister’s offices as a ministerial/private secretary, EA to the NZ First Whip and recently as receptionist/admin support in the National Leader’s Office (Rt Hon Bill English).Prior to these roles, Maree worked for Sir Graeme Harrison, Managing Director, ANZCO and E J Tonks, Managing Director, Independent Casing Company as a personal assistant.

Maree is interested in running and has completed both the New York and Paris marathon, together with half marathons throughout New Zealand.She has also participated in the 2015 ¼ Iron Maori.

 

To contact Maree, you can reach here at [email protected]

 

 

Katie Fell


 

Policy Intern

Completing a Bachelor of Arts in Politics, Philosophy, Economics and Law/Leadership Studies

Katie has recently finished her second year at the University of Richmond. While she studies in Virginia, her home is Chatham, New Jersey, where she has lived with her family for her whole life. At school, she is on track to complete a double major in Politics, Philosophy, Economics, and Law (PPEL) and Leadership Studies. She hopes to attend law school upon graduation. Katie is also a passionate traveler. Last summer, she completed a study abroad programme in La Rochelle, France, where she lived for six weeks. She plans on spending her upcoming semester in London, England, where she will be studying and traveling for four months.

She is working as a Policy Intern at the Rural Women New Zealand National Office. She is currently working on creating a policy register and planning for the RWNZ Summit in November. On her first day, she was lucky enough to sit in on the M.bovis announcement press conference led by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern. So far her internship has been equally exciting and eye-opening.

Katie is hardworking, open-minded, and incredibly appreciative of the opportunity to work at Rural Women New Zealand. She looks forward to learning more throughout the internship and helping RWNZ achieve its goals.

 

 

If you want to contact Katie, you can reach her at [email protected]

 

 

Mehreen Usman


 

Policy Intern

Completing a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and Leadership Studies

Mehreen is a current student at the University of Richmond in Virginia, USA studying Economics and Leadership Studies. After her undergraduate education she plans on attending law school and pursuing a career in the human rights sector. Mehreen is very excited to be joining Rural Women New Zealand for eight weeks as a Policy Intern. Throughout her internship she will help collect policy remits and organise a policy database for the organisation.

She is very passionate about human rights and social justice issues, especially with women’s rights, education, and immigration. Mehreen spends her time at University volunteering for Scholars’ Latino Initiative mentoring high school students who have immigrated from Latin American countries and helping improve their English skills, apply for scholarships, and become college ready. She is also involved with the Oliver Hill Scholars, an academic scholarship given to students who are interested in building a community of learners within a multicultural environment and volunteering in the community. In her free time Mehreen enjoys playing tennis and traveling. Last summer she was able to study abroad in Argentina and the coming semester she will be studying in Prague, Czech Republic. She has really enjoyed her time so far in New Zealand and can’t wait to explore more!

 

If you want to contact Mehreen you can reach her at [email protected]


 

 

National Office welcomes new team members.

Thursday, June 14, 2018

National Office welcome on board three new members to our team. Maree Myers will be working as PA to the Board and Chief Executive Officer, and Katie and Mehreen have come to us from the United States as policy interns for an eight week period. We look to working with them. Read More

Read All NewsRecent news

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the Government's announcement of the Small Business Council. 

Find relevant media about the announcement here

 

 

GOVERNMENT NEEDS TO DO SMALL BUSINESS WITH US NOT FOR US

The new Small Business Council announced by the Government does not fully represent small business says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“While the Minister of Small Business, Hon Stuart Nash, has good intentions with the recent announcement of the Small Business Council, he misses the mark with its membership,” says National Finance Chair and Business Portfolio Convenor Rachael Dean.

“The Government has missed a huge opportunity to work with the rural small business community, instead, opting to work for us, which leaves it open to missing out on real, lived experiences and therefore solid advice and recommendations that will make a difference to the backbone of the New Zealand economy.

“The rural sector is made up of small businesses, many of them owned or partly owned by rural women, yet hands-on rural women in small business are missing from the Small Business Council.

“A quick read through the Terms of Reference shows no reference to the rural sector at all and a word search reveals that rural is not mentioned at all.

“The Small Business Council should include at least one person who is a hands-on small business owner with experience in the rural sector to ensure that for once, their voice is actually heard.

“Experience shows that merely being involved in a consultative process is a waste of time – in order of voices truly to be heard, they need to be at the table.

“RWNZ hopes that the Small Business Council at the very least carries out both a gender impact analysis and a rural impact analysis when developing the Small Business Strategy as per the Terms of Reference.

“The Government needs to work with the small business community, especially with the rural small business community and the women that work within it, to really make a difference,” says Ms Dean.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]

 

Government needs to do small business with us, not for us.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the Government's announcement of the Small Business Council.  Read More

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria. 

 

 

RURAL SCHOOL BUS SERVICE REVIEW NEEDED

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) is calling for a review of the school bus eligibility criteria, particularly in the rural areas.

“The safest way for children to get to school in rural New Zealand is by bus, however, the current eligibility criteria for the service means that children are being put in dangerous situations,” says Education Portfolio Convenor and Board Member, Sue Higgins.

“If children live within two kilometres of a rural school they are not eligible for the local bus service where there is one, and are forced to walk or cycle on roads with no shoulders, often used by logging trucks, stock trucks and milk tankers, making it treacherous for our children.

“RWNZ understands that parents are responsible for ensuring their children go to school, however, the rural bus is vital for farming families who have both a busy working life and distance, for those who live further away, to contend with.

“A review of the criteria applied to children’s eligibility for their local rural school bus service is needed – school by school.

“It’s time the Government showed leadership on keeping our rural children safe on their journey to and from school,” says Mrs Higgins.

Ends

 

For further information, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 

Rural school bus service review needed.

Friday, August 31, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand released a media release calling for a review of school bus eligibility criteria.  Read More

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit. 

 

MEDIA RELEASE

16 August 2018
For immediate release

 

RURAL MATERNITY CARE IN CRISIS

The downgrading of maternity care in rural Otago and Southland will be catastrophic says Rural Women New Zealand(RWNZ).

“On top of the news that Lumsden’s birthing unit has been downgraded to a pre- and post-natal care unit, RWNZ understands that Wanaka has lost its bid to have a primary birthing unit and this does not bode well for rural communities,” says Board Member and Health Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Whilst RWNZ is somewhat pleased that Lumsden will retain care facilities for any woman with pre- and post-natal needs, women ready to give birth will need to travel at least 50 kilometres to the nearest delivery suite.

“Wanaka is expecting 200 births this coming year and there will be no primary birthing unit, and like Lumsden, will become a hub.

“The Otago-Southland region has a huge hinterland with many young parents who are choosing to have families and raise them in this wonderful part of the world and are at risk due to distance from the maternity care they are entitled to.

"No consideration has been given to those parents who have needed the services provided at Lumsden and already travelling up to two hours, now having an extra 50 kilometres added.

“When assessing maternity needs there is always two lives to consider, the mother and the child, and its outrageous that at the time in their lives when they should be close to their families they are not able to be, due to poor decision-making.

“It is not acceptable that pregnant women in rural areas of the South Island are now miles away from anywhere that can support them to have safe births, something a rural impact analysis would have highlighted.

“It’s time the Government and DHB ensured rural communities have the same access to maternity care as urban communities expect,” says Mrs Pittaway.

Ends

 

For more information, please contact National Office.

[email protected]

04 473 5524

 

 

 

 

 

Rural maternity care in crisis

Thursday, August 16, 2018

 Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release following the announcement that Lumsden will lose its birthing unit.  Read More

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Please read below our media release about Suffrage125 celebrations with RWNZ across the country. 

 

NEW ZEALAND’S FARMING WOMEN CELEBRATING 125 YEARS ON

Rural women across the country have been celebrating the 125th year of universal suffrage in a variety of events says Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ).

“The 125th celebration of the day women finally won the right to vote is such a big milestone in New Zealand’s history that commemoration events will to be held over several days,” says National President, Fiona Gower.

“RWNZ Suffrage Day celebrations ranged from sharing family stories about collecting signatures on the petition, marches through rural towns, to our involvement in the ‘What Women Want’ project.

“Other events include capsule openings, celebrations alongside other community groups, and screenings of women-centric movies including ‘She Shears’.

“Our social media campaign in conjunction with the Ministry of Primary Industries showcasing New Zealand’s primary sector women is my personal highlight of the Suffrage 125 commemorations.

“Many of our Members will be celebrating right up until 28 November, which is the date of the first election in which women could vote in 1893,” says Ms Gower.

Ends

For further information, or to schedule an interview, please contact:
Rural Women New Zealand
National Office
04 473 5524
[email protected]


 

 Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding.

Read the announcement here.  

 

 

ANOTHER SET BACK FOR THE HEALTH AND WELLBEING OF RURAL COMMUNITIES

Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) are saddened to see that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will cease operating if it does not receive government funding next week.

 

“RWNZ supports the work already done by RHAANZ in bringing together various rural groups and rural health providers to develop initiatives for rural communities,” says RWNZ Board Member and Health Portfolio Convenor, Margaret Pittaway.

“Remarkable work has been done to deliver the Rural Health Road Map which sets out a plan and priorities for achieving healthily rural communities.

“Being geographically isolated, often with significant distance to the nearest town or health centre means that rural communities have an immediate need of affordable and reliable access to all health services.

“The Government has committed to rural proofing government policy, and RHAANZ has a vital part to play in this development – without the continuation of RHAANZ, and the work it does, rural communities will go backwards.

“There is no other place where issues impacting the health and wellbeing of rural communities are considered concurrently, and the loss of achievements met and efforts made by RHAANZ will be detrimental for our rural people.

RWNZ urges the Government to recognise the good work that has been done by RHAANZ and to support its continuation," says Mrs Pittaway.

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Another setback for health and wellbeing of rural communities.

Friday, April 06, 2018

Rural Women New Zealand has today released a media release following the announcement that the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) will move to shut down if it does not receive funding. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand has released a media release regarding our involvement to help support communities affected by the M.bovis outbreak. With 38 farms currently infected, and others under movement control, we encourage farmers to contact their local Rural Support Trust and visit MPI’s website for advice and support.

 

Read more about this here.

Read the media release below.

 

RURAL WOMEN NEW ZEALAND OFFERS FULL SUPPORT TO GOVERNMENT

 

  Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) has offered their full support to the Government for communities that are affected by the Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) outbreak. This announcement was made in a meeting earlier this week with Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, Minister of Agriculture and Biosecurity Damien O’Connor, and Waikato dairy farmers, then reiterated with industry leaders.

 

“Our rural communities are really hurting in this unprecedented biosecurity outbreak – it is vital they are supported throughout this response, no matter what future plan is decided next week,” says RWNZ National President Fiona Gower.

“From what I saw on Monday and what we are hearing from our members and others in the industry, it is clear that the response to M. bovis is upsetting and we are pleased to have been able to offer our support.

“Since 1925, RWNZ members have been the glue that holds rural communities together and nearly 100 years later we continue by working with Rural Support Trusts, visiting farming families, and offering funding for adverse events.

“The decision to offer our full support comes from recent meetings with industry leaders and the Minister, and from our many years’ experience supporting rural communities.

“We are pleased that RWNZ can continue our tradition of charitable giving and we look forward to working with the Government and industry to ensure rural communities are fully supported through the M. bovis outbreak,” says Ms Gower.

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