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Eleven women from around New Zealand arrive in Wellington today for the start of a three day leadership course co-ordinated by Rural Women NZ and sponsored by Landcorp.

The women, all Rural Women NZ members, are active in their communities and are now looking to grow their communications skills, enhance their networks, and learn more of th

e work of our organisation at a national level.

“The women will explore what makes an effective leader, how to influence others and the importance of networks both within the organisation and in the broader rural sector,” says Rural Women NZ national president, Wendy McGowan.

Leading this first section of the programme will be Agri-Women’s Development Trust founder, Lindy Nelson, who is also the 2013 Next Business Woman of the Year.

“The women all bring strong skills to the table, and we hope this leadership programme will give them a greater understanding of the role Rural Women NZ plays at national level for the good of rural communities, and how they can be part of that,” says Mrs McGowan.

On the second day, participants will meet members of both the Labour and National parties’ Women’s Caucus, and will have the opportunity to observe Parliament in action.

Vanisa Dhiru, chief executive of Volunteering New Zealand will share her insights into ways to inspire volunteers, while David Chrisp, general manager North Island for Access Homehealth Ltd, will be encouraging the participants to take an active role in the community through the home healthcare sector.

During 2014 Rural Women NZ is partnering with the Ministry of Social Development (MSD) to bring the It’s OK to Ask for Help campaign to rural communities with a letterbox sticker campaign.  Wellington-based MSD staff, Sheryl Hann and Stephanie Edmond, will present on the need to change the way New Zealanders act and think about family violence.

As broadband becomes more widely available in rural communities, online communications and connectivity are becoming increasingly accessible. David Farrar, Kiwiblog founder, will talk about the possibilities social media presents for rural.

Landcorp will kindly host the group for lunch on the final day of the leadership course, with the opportunity for the women to network with the new CEO, Steven Carden, and other staff.


sponsored by           

partnering with         


Dr Judy McGregor, Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner with the Human Rights Commission, will be speaking on worker discrimination in the aged care sector at a breakfast meeting in Dunedin on 30 November, and members of the public are warmly invited to come along.

Earlier this year, Dr McGregor worked ‘under cover’ as a trainee carer in a residential aged care facility to gain insight into the many aspects of aged care.
The result was her in-depth report “Caring Counts”, which is a call to action over the injustices and inequalities faced by workers in the aged care sector.
She says, “The value we place on older people in New Zealand is linked to the value we place on those who care for them.
“The sense of crisis that surrounds aged care is partly a reflection of our collective knowledge that we are not being fair and that a large group of workers is being discriminated against.
“Inaction on pay equality and inadequate compensation are breaches of fundamental human rights. Given their significance, these breaches cannot be justified by affordability arguments.”
Dr McGregor will be speaking in the William Cargill Room, Cargills Hotel, George Street, Dunedin at 7.45am on Friday 30 November.
Rural Women NZ national councillor, Margaret Pittaway, says “This is a wonderful opportunity to hear Dr McGregor speak, and all are welcome.”
Coffee and muffins will be served and there is no entry charge.
Enquiries to Margaret Pittaway, National Councillor, Rural Women New Zealand.  Email:   [email protected] or call (03) 445 1201. 

Dunedin invitation to hear Dr Judy McGregor speak on aged care injustices 16-Nov-2012

Friday, November 16, 2012

Dr Judy McGregor, Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner with the Human Rights Commission, will be speaking on worker discrimination in the aged care sector at a breakfast meeting in Dunedin on 30 November, and members of the public are warmly invited to come along.  Read More

Rosemary The Sheep had triplets! “Hi, I'm Rosemary, on 28 July 2011 I had triplet lambs. My owners thought I was pretty clever! Farmer Anne's friends have named my lambs Sage, Thyme and Mint. You will be surprised to see how much they have grown!


Follow me on Facebook to see what my life is like on the farm in the hill country of the Tararua District in New Zealand.”

www.facebook.com/rosemarythesheep

Rosemary the Sheep is a new project designed to tell the story of what life is like in rural New Zealand.

Triplet lambs Sage, Thyme and Mint

We will follow Rosemary through lambing, weaning, docking, shearing, drenching, dipping and more. The aim is to get urban children and adults excited about what rural New Zealand has to offer and to teach everyone something new about the life of a sheep in New Zealand.

New! Introducing Rosemary 25-Aug-2011

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Rosemary The Sheep had triplets! “Hi, I'm Rosemary, on 28 July 2011 I had triplet lambs. My owners thought I was pretty clever! Farmer Anne's friends have named my lambs Sage, Thyme and Mint. You will be surprised to see how much they have grown!


Follow me on Facebook to see what my life is like on the farm in the hill country of the Tararua District in New Zealand.” Read More

Wow!  In the first week since our launch, 100,000 people visited our aftersocks™ website and thousands of comments were posted on our aftersocks™ Facebook page, congratulating us on this wonderful fundraiser to support the Christchurch Mayoral Fund.  We increased our sock order with the NZ Sock Company in Ashburton several times over, and still we’ll be struggling to meet demand as aftersocks™ goes global.

When you get your pair of aftersocks™ don’t forget to send in photos of the awesome places you’ve worn them by for our ‘Quaking in Your aftersocks™’ photo competition.  Upload your photos and tag yourself on Facebook, to be in to win one of several photographic prize packs that have been donated by photographers across the country.  aftersocks™ can be purchased through www.aftersocks.co.nz.

On a more sobering note, feedback from Christchurch is that with the ongoing earthquakes and thousands of aftershocks, stress levels are now very high leading to abuse, depression, violence and bullying.

After the September 3rd earthquake members raised $10,000 to support people affected by the earthquake.  Following the February 22 earthquake this amount swelled to $20,000 with a generous donation from the Queensland Country Women’s Association of $8469.  The South Australia Country Women’s Association International Committee also gifted $1,000 for knitting wool for garments to be sent to Christchurch.  We thank both groups for their fantastic support.  We are working through the process of how this funding will be put to best use.

Rock Those Socks 03-Aug-2011

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Wow!  In the first week since our launch, 100,000 people visited our aftersocks™ website and thousands of comments were posted on our aftersocks™ Facebook page, congratulating us on this wonderful fundraiser to support the Christchurch Mayoral Fund.  We increased our sock order with the NZ Sock Company in Ashburton several times over, and still we’ll be struggling to meet demand as aftersocks™ goes global. Read More



When ‘Farmy Army’ members rolled up their sleeves to clean up the liquefaction in Christchurch after the June earthquake, RWNZ member Helen Heddell also launched into action to organise the catering crews to ensure no-one was working on an empty stomach.

By the end of the week she’d co-ordinated the cooking of 1200 hot dinners, been up at dawn to cook breakfast for the volunteers and arranged packed lunches for the hundreds of workers as they left for another long day shovelling silt.

Helen says ‘don’t ask how my feet are!’ but otherwise she’s very happy with the support she and caterer Nicki Geddes have had for the huge logistical exercise.

She says lessons learnt from the clean up in February helped.  “We have simplified it right down,”

For a week Helen’s day began at 7am at the Canterbury Showgrounds cooking omelettes, bacon and muffins for those who camped overnight.

20 women then turned up each day to help with whatever was required.  They began by making packed lunches for the Student Volunteers and the Farmy Army, who set out with wheelbarrows, diggers and bobcats to clean up the grey liquefaction that covered many of the city’s streets and gardens.

“Rural women have been very supportive,” says Helen, with many city folk pitching in as well. “We had 12 women from Oamaru and a group from Hawke’s Bay turned up out of the woodwork.”

The amount of baking that came in was ‘phenomenal’.  “It is amazing, we have four wheel drives turning up every half hour full of it.”  Two transport companies and one stock firm collected baking from as far afield as Southland. 

Mid-afternoon, preparation for the evening meal began, with hearty food on the menu. 

Helen arranged sponsorship of the meat from the meat companies and processors, as she did for the February clean up.  “They have been fantastic.  People have just been so good.”

Cooking up a storm to feed the Farmy Army 03-Aug-2011

Wednesday, August 03, 2011



When ‘Farmy Army’ members rolled up their sleeves to clean up the liquefaction in Christchurch after the June earthquake, RWNZ member Helen Heddell also launched into action to organise the catering crews to ensure no-one was working on an empty stomach. Read More

There has been a heart-warming response to our Communities Knitting Together project to support Cantabrians after the earthquakes, with donations pouring in from members and friends all over the country. 

Thousands of warm knitted items have been distributed to those in need.

Canterbury councillor, Kerry Maw, has delivered several mini-van loads of beautifully-knitted warm items to community, church and school contacts who’ve been giving them out as quickly as they’ve arrived.

“Some of the women had tears in their eyes, they were so overwhelmed,” says Kerry.

Groups who’ve helped distribute the knitting include Birthright, the Salvation Army, the Aranui Community Trust and the Dallington Hub Community Group.  “They have been blown away by the support,” says Kerry.

The mountains of knitting included hats, scarves, jerseys, booties and slippers, as well as knee rugs and peggy square blankets.

The project has united communities, just as Kerry hoped it would.

“I knew there would be a really good response, but I was surprised at just how much people got into it!” 

Alongside Rural Women New Zealand knitters, items have been received from spinners and weavers clubs, Lions and community craft groups.

Cathy from the Aranui Community Trust says the items have been given directly to families in need through their nurses and earthquake co-ordinators, as well as through church groups that the Trust links in with.

“Families are over the moon because it’s really cold here.”

All the items Aranui’s received from our Communities Knitting Together project have been given out, and more can still be used says Cathy.  She says hundreds of beanies and babies bonnets have been distributed.  “Jerseys go as fast as they come in.”

While our Communities Knitting Together project has now finished, if anyone would like to continue knitting for those in need in Christchurch, we have a list of community groups where items can be sent directly.  Please contact national office for details.

[In a box]  Margaret Townsend of Piako-Waikato East provincial promoted the Communities Knitting Together project by word of mouth and through her local community newspaper and was amazed at the number of items she received.

A mammoth one hundred and eight boxes were filled with knitting, blankets and warm clothing that arrived from neighbours, friends, family and the wider community.  A local carrier transported the knitting and clothing to Canterbury free of charge.  Many of the donations simply arrived on Margaret’s doorstep, but she also drove to places she’s never been before to pick up knitting, she says.  “I am sure [the great response] was because we were Rural Women.  It was absolutely brilliant.”

[In a box]  In Tauranga, members decided to support Glassons’ project to sell black and red scarves as a Canterbury earthquake fundraiser.  “We have so far knitted 25 red and black scarves,” says Mary McTavish.  “As well as this we have been busy knitting supporting the “Communities Knitting Together” campaign.  We delivered to the local Red Cross offices in Tauranga 280 items of hand knitting including teddy bears, beanies, hats, scarves, slippers and children’s jumpers.”  Great work Tauranga members!


Knitting Communities Together 03-Aug-2011

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

There has been a heart-warming response to our Communities Knitting Together project to support Cantabrians after the earthquakes, with donations pouring in from members and friends all over the country.   Read More



Making cheese is something the Harper women have done for generations, originally bringing their skills to New Zealand from Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire, the home of English stilton cheese. 

It’s been a recipe for success, which culminated in Lisa Harper taking away the Supreme Winner trophy at the RWNZ Enterprising Rural Women Award 2011 during our national conference in Auckland in May.

Lisa learned cheese making from her grandmother and mother.  Growing up it was just another regular household task, "It's like vacuuming.  Cheese and I have grown up together!”

Lisa spent her childhood on the family farm at the head of the Mahau Sounds in Marlborough, and received her education through The Correspondence School, before setting off to Wellington to do a science degree. 

She began her working life travelling the country as a research scientist, but returned to the farm eight years ago to help out ‘for a few months’.  It became a labour of love, and Lisa has transformed the flagging fortunes of the sheep farm by developing cheese making into a business to compliment the farm stay accommodation she and her mother run.

Lisa says she loves feeding people, and her farm guests were often fascinated by the cheeses she served at dinner and wanted to see how it was made.  Quick to see a new business opportunity, Lisa now runs cheese making classes that even-out the seasonal cash flow, attracting guests to Sherrington Grange all year round.

Lisa’s also a regular at the Marlborough Farmers’ Market, where people are treated to tastings of her cheese.  “I get to feed people for three hours. It's like a weekly date."

Lisa describes her range of cheeses as mild, medium, and "deadly", depending on how long they age for.

“I consider myself a cheese ager, not a cheese maker, because my job is to make sure the cheese ages properly and develops to what it's supposed to."

Back on the farm the cheese making process continues through the week. “We lovingly coax fresh milk into cheese in our tiny farm dairy from recipes more than two centuries old,” says Lisa.  “Each cheese is hand-crafted using traditional methods which have been discarded by modern dairy factories in the quest for efficiency.

“We choose to make only limited quantities of cheese, using the old ways, because we believe it creates a better product - this is the way cheese was before mechanisation and standardisation became the norm. Sherrington cheeses look, smell and taste the way they were meant to.”

Like many of our entrants this year, Lisa was encouraged to enter the RWNZ Enterprising Rural Women Award by one of our members, and giving recognition to rural women entrepreneurs achieving extraordinary things is a key reason for our running the Award.

Lisa’s win has received extensive publicity on TV, in provincial and farming newspapers and trade journals, as well as from overseas publications such as the USA goat industry magazine, and is an excellent way of promoting our organisation.

Runners up in the Award were North Island winners Nestling Limited, run by sisters Bernadine Guilleux and Maria-Fe Rohrlach.  Their Rotorua-based business makes baby slings and pouches from merino wool and organic cotton.  The judges were particularly impressed with the business’ use of New Zealand raw materials, as well as their online marketing strategies which connect them in a very personal way with their customers.

We thank our Award co-sponsors, Access Homehealth Ltd and Telecom for their support.

For more information on our winners go to www.sherringtongrange.co.nz and www.nestling.co.nz

The Taste of Success 02-Aug-2011

Tuesday, August 02, 2011



Making cheese is something the Harper women have done for generations, originally bringing their skills to New Zealand from Melton Mowbray in Leicestershire, the home of English stilton cheese.   Read More

Read All NewsRecent news

The Rural Women New Zealand National Office has relocated to Technology One House, Level 5, 86-96 Victoria Street, Wellington.

RWNZ National Office would like to advise members that since the relocation on 10 July 2017, postal delivery to the new office location has been disrupted.

We have already mailed out Membership invoices to members. We expect that you may be sending your payment and invoice slip back to National Office. We are aware that some mail posted to RWNZ has been returned to senders. Sincere apologies for any inconvenience. We are working with New Zealand Post to resolve the situation as soon as possible.

If you have any concerns about invoices, please email: [email protected] or phone the National Office: 04 473 5524.

As at Tuesday 18 July, the reception phone line is connected, phone 04 4735524. 

If you have an email enquiry, please email [email protected]

We will keep you updated with progress on the relocation, phone and email services, through the RWNZ website and social media: Facebook (www.facebook.com/ruralwomennz/) and Twitter (www.twitter.com/RuralWomenNZ).

 

 

RWNZ National Office has moved

Thursday, July 06, 2017

The Rural Women New Zealand National Office has relocated to Technology One House, Level 5, 86-96 Victoria Street, Wellington. Read More

The Government has announced that an extra $270 million will be spent on improving rural broadband and bridging cellphone blackspots in regions throughout New Zealand.

$130m will be spent on expanding fibre-optic ultrafast broadband (UFB) to another 60,000 homes and businesses in 190 towns.

$140m will extend the number of subsidised wireless broadband services to another 74,000 homes and businesses, as well as deliver mobile coverage to approximately 1000km of rural highways and more than 100 tourist areas.

Once completed, UFB will be available to 87 per cent of the population and 99 per cent will have access to high speed internet by 2022.

“The benefits of extra spending to expand connectivity for rural communities are immense. The services will lead to greater economic growth and better access to online education, social services and health information,” says Fiona Gower, National President of Rural Women New Zealand.

“Rural residents will feel safer with better mobile coverage, and the connectivity will reduce the feeling of isolation for those living in remote areas.”

In the past few years, RWNZ has been involved in discussions with nationwide broadband and mobile service providers and government agencies to ensure that rural connectivity remains a top priority. RWNZ is a member of the Telecommunications Users Association of New Zealand (TUANZ) and has provided feedback to Crown Fibre Holdings on the social and economic benefits of improved rural connectivity.

RWNZ policy work includes submissions on the RBI 2 and mobile black spots programmes, the draft Digital Technologies education curriculum and the Review of the Telecommunications Act 2001.

While the majority of the roll out contract has been won by Chorus and a joint venture between Spark, Vodafone and 2 Degrees; smaller wireless internet providers (WISPs) will receive work worth $13m.

Click here to read more about the roll out.


We spoke to Bridget Canning who is the operator of Wizwireless which is a provider of high speed wireless internet broadband for the Wairarapa region. 

“WIZwireless supports the Government in addressing the need to improve the broadband services that remote kiwis rely on and we will provide more and better services throughout the Wairarapa Region," says Bridget.

“WIZwireless is delighted that the Government has recognised the vital role that Wireless Internet Service Providers (WISPs) already play in getting reliable and effective broadband to many rural and remote New Zealanders.

“WISPs all over New Zealand are going to deliver fast, modern broadband, that will meet or exceed the Government's target rural broadband specifications by using the latest fixed wireless technologies, this is how tens of thousands of rural kiwi's already get their broadband internet connections including WIZwireless.

“WISP's have proven themselves to be reliable, robust and resilient, during last year's Kaikoura earthquake Amuri Net was the only telecommunications network to come through intact and provided the community with vital connectivity in the days following the earthquake.

“This additional investment by the Government will allow us, the WISPs to upgrade our existing networks and build new sites that will expand our coverage to even more rural and remote internet users who are desperately in need of modern broadband connectivity.

“Individual WISPs who are participating in RBI2 will release their own plans for their local RBI2 programs, we are local businesses who know our communities very well and we are excited by the opportunities that will be created by improved broadband in our communities.”

Bridget received a Certificate of Special Recognition as an Enterprising Rural Woman, at the 2015 RWNZ Enterprising Rural Women Awards for her business success to date.


 

Faster rollout of broadband and mobile will improve connectivity to rural homes

Friday, September 01, 2017

The Government has announced that an extra $270 million will be spent on improving rural broadband and bridging cellphone blackspots in regions throughout New Zealand. Read More

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events.

The Rural Support Trust advise farmers to ensure stock and domestic animals have food, water, and shelter where necessary, and are secure. Ensure that all stock injuries are promptly attended too, after human needs are met.

If your farm or rural property or stock has been affected by an adverse event and you need assistance, contact your local Rural Support Trust on 0800 787 254 (0800 RURAL HELP) with information on the impacts on your farm, or requests for help.

The Rural Women New Zealand Adverse Events and Relief Fund is available to individuals, communities and groups, with a particular emphasis on rural women and children. The fund provides financial assistance to persons or groups, where there is an identified urgent need due to recent adverse events such as drought, fires, floods or earthquakes.

Click here to read more about applying for the fund.

Contact details for support agencies:
The Rural Support Trust (RST organise community events and one-on-one mentoring, as well as targeted support services in emergency situations)  
http://www.rural-support.org.nz Ph: 0800 787 254.

DairyNZ: Sharemilkers support http://www.dairynz.co.nz/farm/tactics/support-for-sharemilkers/

Federated Farmers http://www.fedfarm.org.nz/ Ph: 0800 327 646 or drought feedline 0800 376 844.

Doug Avery’s Resilient Farmer http://www.resilientfarmer.co.nz/

Farmstrong http://www.farmstrong.co.nz


If you just want to talk, or know someone who is at risk, there are a range of support options available, including counselling services:

Lifeline: 0800 543 354 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling

Youthline: 0800 376 633 or free text 234 - Provides 24 hour telephone and text counselling services for young people

Samaritans: 0800 726 666 - Provides 24 hour telephone counselling.

Women's Refuge: 0800 REFUGE (733 843) a 24/7 crisis and support line provide advice and information.

Shakti New Zealand 0800SHAKTI (0800 742 584) If you are in a situation of domestic violence call our 24-hour crisis line, and multi-lingual staff will provide information.

Tautoko: 0508 828 865 - provides support, information and resources to people at risk of suicide, and their family, whānau and friends.

What'sup: 0800 942 8787 (0800 What’s Up) is a counselling helpline for children and young people, aged 5-18. Phone Mon-Fri 1-10pm, Sat-Sun 3-10pm.

Kidsline: 0800 543 754, it is a 24/7 helpline for children and teens, run by specially trained youth volunteers.

Thelowdown.co.nz - Free Text 5626, watch videos or contact for support. 

depression.org.nz National Depression Initiative (for adults), 0800 111 757 - 24 hour service 

Ministry for Vulnerable Children Oranga Tamariki If you're worried about a child or family that you know, there are ways you can help, contact Child, Youth and Family.

For information about suicide prevention, see http://www.spinz.org.nz .

If it is an emergency, or you feel yourself, or someone you know is at risk, please call 111.

Rural community support services

Thursday, April 06, 2017

Rural Support Trust representatives are working closely with farmers to monitor well-being and directing them to relief assistance for flooding and other adverse events. Read More

The Ministry of Health has proposed a new framework for suicide prevention and is seeking feedback. Rural Women New Zealand’s (RWNZ) submission supports the general framework.

Although expresses concern regarding the lack of concrete targets and detailed methods for how any of the initiatives will be implemented. We are especially concerned about the lack of a strategic plan to lead and fund these activities.

The proposed framework aims to address the devastating impact that suicide has on New Zealand’s communities and the unfortunate reality that over 500 people in New Zealand die by suicide every year. RWNZ supports the framework’s focus on supporting positive wellbeing for all ages, increasing awareness of suicidal behaviour and mental health, strengthening systems already in place to support communities, and improving collaboration among those working to prevent suicidal behaviour.

In our submission, we have addressed the fact that the suicide rate is higher in rural areas than in urban areas, as well as the various factors that place rural communities at an increased risk of mental illness. These factors include vulnerability to economic fluctuations and social isolation, which are compounded by the lack of access to services and support, substandard or no access to reliable and affordable internet and mobile coverage, and the history of inequalities that rural communities face often being overlooked.

RWNZ has suggested that in order to improve mental wellbeing in rural areas, rural health research must become a priority to understand and address the needs of rural communities. We have also urged the Ministry of Health to refrain from relying on technological health services, recognising that not all rural communities have access to reliable and affordable internet and mobile coverage.

Rural Women New Zealand strongly supports the framework’s proposal to involve, train and educate community members on suicide prevention. Rural Women New Zealand has expressed that it is essential for rural communities to be provided with the right tools to improve mental wellbeing within the community and reduce social stigma associated with mental illness.

As further information becomes available, this will be distributed to the members.

 

Click here to download the Submission: June 2017 Suicide Prevention Strategy Submission


 

 

Suicide Prevention Strategy Submission

Wednesday, July 26, 2017

The Ministry of Health has proposed a new framework for suicide prevention and is seeking feedback. Rural Women New Zealand’s (RWNZ) submission supports the general framework. Read More

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.

RWNZ was one of the founding members of ACWW. It is one of the largest international development organisations for rural women.

The ACWW network allows it to engage at the local, national, and international level with the aim of achieving these goals:

- To raise the standard of living for rural women and their families through education, training and community development programmes.

- To provide practical support to our members and help them set up income-generating schemes.

- To support educational opportunities for women and girls, and help eliminate gender discrimination.

- To give rural women a voice at an international level through our links with UN agencies and bodies.

Caption: Delegates from the South Pacific Area Conference in New Plymouth complete the ACWW Walk the World event in April 2017. 

Click here to download an information booklet about ACWW (8MB PDF)

Click here to go to the ACWW website

 

ACWW Study Topic 2017

Friday, June 16, 2017

Associated Country Women of the World (ACWW) is RWNZ's topic of study for 2017. We have included an overview of the purpose of ACWW below, along with some links to further information.  Read More

The Justice and Electoral Committee is seeking feedback on the Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill. RWNZ's submission fully supports the Bill and its intent to prevent forced marriages from occurring in New Zealand by requiring minors aged 16 and 17 to gain approval by the Family Court in order to marry.

In our submission, RWNZ cited various international conventions and declarations of which New Zealand is a signatory or party to that do not condone forced marriage. These include the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), and the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). RWNZ expressed that the proposed amendment to New Zealand’s marriage law upholds New Zealand’s commitment to these documents.

RWNZ also noted that the law as it currently stands, which allows minors aged 16 and 17 to marry with parental consent, is insufficient in preventing forced marriage. The proposed amendment serves as a precaution to prevent parental guardians from attempting to facilitate a forced marriage.

As further information becomes available, this will be distributed to the members.

Click here to download the RWNZ submission.

Marriage Amendment Bill

Tuesday, July 25, 2017

The Justice and Electoral Committee is seeking feedback on the Marriage (Court Consent to Marriage of Minors) Amendment Bill. RWNZ's submission fully supports the Bill and its intent to prevent forced marriages from occurring in New Zealand by requiring minors aged 16 and 17 to gain approval by the Family Court in order to marry. Read More