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  • Women Walk the World 90 km Challenge

    Celebrating 90 years is the perfect excuse to put our best foot forward, so we're issuing the 90 km challenge as part of our Women Walk the World 2015 events. More

  • Women Walk the World 90 km Challenge

  • 90 for 90 Challenge

    Rural Women New Zealand groups and individual members have taken up the challenge to make 90 donations during 2015, in recognition of the 90 years we have been working for rural communities. How you can take part

  • 90 for 90 Challenge

  • Poppies pour in for Patriotic Call to Yarn Project

    Rural Women members have been knitting up a storm of poppies in commemoration of those service men and women who lost their lives in the First World War 100 years ago. More

  • Poppies pour in for Patriotic Call to Yarn Project

  • Pedal power raises funds for Guide Dog

    Ninety Rural Women members and friends have teamed up with Julie Woods aka 'That Blind Woman' to raise funds for a guide dog, as they cycle and walk the Otago Central Rail Trail in April as part of the Triple F Challenge 2015. The goal is to raise $30,000 to train a puppy. Read more and make a donation

  • Pedal power raises funds for Guide Dog

  • New Trees on Farms video series

    Ann Irving features in one of 68 new videos produced by NZ Farm Forestry Association encouraging people to plant trees for shelter, sustainability and stock management More information and link to videos

  • New Trees on Farms video series

  • feature stories

  • Women Walk the World 90 km Challenge

    Celebrating 90 years is the perfect excuse to put our best foot forward, so we're issuing the 90 km challenge as part of our Women Walk the World 2015 events. More

  • Women Walk the World 90 km Challenge

  • 90 for 90 Challenge

    Rural Women New Zealand groups and individual members have taken up the challenge to make 90 donations during 2015, in recognition of the 90 years we have been working for rural communities. How you can take part

  • 90 for 90 Challenge

  • Poppies pour in for Patriotic Call to Yarn Project

    Rural Women members have been knitting up a storm of poppies in commemoration of those service men and women who lost their lives in the First World War 100 years ago. More

  • Poppies pour in for Patriotic Call to Yarn Project

  • Pedal power raises funds for Guide Dog

    Ninety Rural Women members and friends have teamed up with Julie Woods aka 'That Blind Woman' to raise funds for a guide dog, as they cycle and walk the Otago Central Rail Trail in April as part of the Triple F Challenge 2015. The goal is to raise $30,000 to train a puppy. Read more and make a donation

  • Pedal power raises funds for Guide Dog

  • New Trees on Farms video series

    Ann Irving features in one of 68 new videos produced by NZ Farm Forestry Association encouraging people to plant trees for shelter, sustainability and stock management More information and link to videos

  • New Trees on Farms video series

VIEW ALL RECENT NEWSRecent news

Rural Women members have been helping to present $2000 jumbo-sized cheques to eleven rural schools who were lucky enough to win the Farmlands Garden Grants competition.

Pictured here are pupils from Wharepapa South School, who received their winnings from the secretary of the local Rural Women branch, Jacqui Wellington.

The popular grants are a joint Rural Women New Zealand/Farmlands venture, aimed at helping schools develop vegetable gardens and orchards.

This is the fourth year we've given out the gardening grants with funds from the popular Farmlands Ladies Nights.

“It’s a great way to help schools teach children how easy it is to grow food and what makes a healthy diet. In past years the gardening grants have been used by schools to build tunnel houses, composting systems, buy plants and fruit trees and gardening equipment.”

This year 52 North Island schools and 38 South Island schools applied for the grants. The entries were colourful and enthusiastic, and in some cases included videos created by the children showing what they hoped to achieve in their gardens.

The lucky winners are:

Otamarakau School, Bay of Plenty
Paparoa Primary School, Northland
Te Horo School, Kapiti
Wharepapa South School, Waikato
Norfolk School, Taranaki
Patoka School, Hawke’s Bay
Lauriston School, Canterbury
Seddon School, Marlborough
Clutha Valley Primary School, Otago
Lake Brunner School, West Coast
Waianiwa School, Southland


The schools also received fertiliser from Agrisea NZ Ltd and a copy of ‘A Good Harvest – recipes from the gardens of Rural Women New Zealand'.

Farmlands’ Chief Executive, Brent Esler, says the company is proud to continue its support of Rural Women New Zealand and the rural school garden grants.

“As a rural co-operative it just makes sense for us to support schools that make up the hubs of the rural communities we service.”



Farmlands Garden Grants 2015

Friday, February 20, 2015

Rural Women members have been helping to present $2000 jumbo-sized cheques to eleven rural schools who were lucky enough to win the Farmlands Garden Grants competition. Read More

Now's time to embrace your New Year’s resolutions! Register for the free REVEAL course being held at the Whangarei Showgrounds on 10 March 2015.


REVEAL is a one day course that will inspire and challenge you to reach your potential, designed by 2013 NEXT Businesswoman of the Year and executive director of the Agri-Women’s Development Trust, Lindy Nelson.  
Lindy Nelson is being brought to Northland by Rural Women New Zealand at the instigation of Dargaville member and CEO of the Kaipara Community Health Trust, Debbie Evans. 

Debbie says, “In 2014 I attended the Rural Women New Zealand Growing Dynamic Leaders course in Wellington, which Lindy Nelson helped facilitate. I came away from Lindy’s presentation challenged and re-energised, thinking ‘I need to bring this fabulous woman to Northland to inspire others.’

“We have so many volunteers putting in hours of effort to enhance our communities, schools, service and sports clubs, emergency services etc, but many rural people don’t get the opportunity for facilitated personal development.”

The REVEAL course will help women recognise their unique skills and strengths, build confidence and help them reach their full potential.

“You’ll learn new tips that help recharge your batteries and receive confirmation and acknowledgement of the skills you already have and regularly use,” says Debbie.

The Whangarei REVEAL course is free to participants, thanks to funding from the Lottery Grants Board and Community Organisations Grants Scheme and is limited to 150 attendees.

Debbie urges, “Arrange a day’s annual leave, find a baby sitter, bring your mother, neighbour, sister along - everyone over the age of 16 is welcome. You don’t need to be a Rural Women® member to attend”.

Women from the Far North to Franklin Districts are encouraged to register by 28 February by emailing Kath on kargill@farmside.co.nz or phone/texting Debbie on 027 558 6272.

Details: Whangarei Showgrounds, 10 March, 10am-4pm

Northland REVEAL Leadership Programme 10 March 2015

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Now's time to embrace your New Year’s resolutions! Register for the free REVEAL course being held at the Whangarei Showgrounds on 10 March 2015. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand is concerned for the mental well-being of farmers as they struggle with the current drought.

“However, the overriding concern for Rural Women™ is women, who are often at the sharp end when mental illness strikes,” says president Wendy McGowan. “While they are seen as carers and nurturers they are not immune to stress and depression, but are most likely to put their own mental wellbeing on hold and ‘keep calm and carry on’.”


It is well recognised that family violence spikes after an adverse event with increased reports continuing for up to two years following the event. Rural women are especially vulnerable, given their distance from neighbours, health care, child care, family, friends and services. The insidiousness of a drought when there is no end in sight further compounds the problem.


The uniqueness of the farm/home environment and joint nature of agribusiness is a further challenge if a woman wishes to leave an abusive relationship. The economic and emotional ties make it very difficult to walk away from those responsibilities.


“Women play a major role in achieving resilience in rural communities. A quiet word may be all that it takes to initiate help and support and prevent a tragedy,” says Mrs McGowan, “Rural Women™ is well placed and committed to supporting women and families in rural communities.”


Link to Drought Resource 2015 document




Drought sparks Domestic Violence and Stress Concerns - 13 Jan 2015

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

Rural Women New Zealand is concerned for the mental well-being of farmers as they struggle with the current drought. Read More

When Rural Women members heard about the devastating floods in The Solomons last year, they decided to do something to help.

Through raffles, donations and the sale of plants and fundraising through our Women Walk the World events we raised $11,500 with the idea of replacing lost books for the 40 schools that were washed away or damaged in the floods.

With very helpful assistance from Graeme Morrison of Random House, we were able to purchase 4,000 books to the retail value of $34,000. 

The school readers were all packaged into vermin and waterproof plastic boxes before being freighted by Random House to The Solomons, where Anna Reid of the NZ High Commission arranged the waiver of Customs Duty and liaison with the local Ministry of Education for distribution.

As the new school year starts, the books are being handed out to the excited pupils and their teachers. Pictured here are children at St John School, Honiara, with their new books.

Anna Reid at the NZ High Commission says, "I had a lovely chat with each of the Head Teachers and explained the background - they were all extremely grateful for your support, and all mentioned how they didn't have enough books, and so it was an extremely relevant contribution."

School Books for Solomon Islands - 20 Feb 2015

Friday, February 20, 2015

When Rural Women members heard about the devastating floods in The Solomons last year, they decided to do something to help. Read More

Afghan girls can't ride a bike, but can ride a skateboard.

'Skateistan' began as a grassroots 'Sport for Development' project on the streets of Kabul in 2007, and is now winning awards as an international NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) with projects in Afghanistan, Cambodia and South Africa. Skateistan is the first international development initiative to combine skateboarding with education.
It all began when Australian skateboarder Oliver Percovich dropped his board in Kabul in 2007. He was surrounded by the eager faces of children of all ages who wanted to be shown how to skate. 

A group of Afghan friends (aged 18-22) shared Ollie's three boards and quickly progressed in their new favourite sport—and so skateboarding hit Afghanistan. The success with the first students prompted Ollie to think bigger: by bringing more boards back to Kabul and establishing an indoor skateboarding venue, the program would be able to teach many more youth, and also be able to provide older girls with a private facility to continue skateboarding.

Skateistan has emerged as Afghanistan’s first skateboarding school, and is dedicated to teaching both male and female students. The non-profit skateboarding charity has constructed the two largest indoor sport facilities in Afghanistan, and hosts the largest female sporting organization (composed of female skateboarders). Skateistan believes that when youth come together to skateboard and play, they forge bonds that transcend social barriers. 

BEYOND SKATEBOARDING

Skateboarding is simply "the hook" for engaging with hard-to-reach young people (ages 5-18). Skateistan's development aid programs work with growing numbers of marginalized youth through skateboarding, and provide them with new opportunities in cross-cultural interaction, education, and personal empowerment programs. 

In Kabul, Skateistan's participants come from all of Afghanistan’s diverse ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds, and include 40 percent female students, hundreds of street-working children, and youth with disabilities. In the skatepark and classrooms they develop skills in skateboarding, leadership, civic responsibility, multimedia, and creative arts, exploring topics such as environmental health, culture/traditions, natural resources, and peace. The students themselves decide what they want to learn and Skateistan gives them with a safe space and opportunities to develop the skills that they consider important.

Afghanistan  is Rural Women New Zealand's 'country of study' for 2015.

Skateistan information courtesy of skateistan.org.


Afghanistan - Country of Study 2015 - 2 Feb 2015

Monday, February 02, 2015

Afghan girls can't ride a bike, but can ride a skateboard. Read More

Rural Women New Zealand says the recent accident in Canterbury, when a teen was hit crossing the road after getting off a school bus, may have been avoided if the bus had been fitted with flashing 20K signs.

 


Rural Women New Zealand took part in a trial of new LED signs in Ashburton last year, which included a public education and police enforcement campaign. The trial proved very successful in slowing drivers and Rural Women New Zealand hopes that the signs will be approved for general use on school buses in 2015.

"Rural Women NZ has been advocating for years for public awareness and driver education around school bus safety, especially the 20K speed limit in either direction. Using technology to get the message across to drivers has been a big part of our campaign."

The ‘Either Way It’s 20K’ Ashburton trial saw a marked drop in speeds when the flashing 20K signs were operating.

“The flashing lights and illuminated signs are visible for a considerable distance, alerting drivers to slow down
especially in a 100kph zone.

"Every day motorists speed past school buses, putting children's lives at risk on rural roads and non-urban State highways," Mrs McGowan says.  

The NZ Transport Agency agrees the results of the Ashburton trial are promising, provided they are widely and consistently used on entire school bus fleets, and supported by active and widespread community engagement and publicity.

The Transport Agency is in discussions with the Ministry of Transport, the Ministry of Education and Police on the possibility of wider use of the signs from next year.

In the meantime, Rural Women New Zealand urges drivers to be more vigilant and slow down to 20kp/h when passing a school bus in either direction.

"Children of all ages can be unpredictable. It only takes a moment of inattention for a child to dart across a road without looking or misjudge the speed and distance of an approaching vehicle.”

Since 1987 23 children have been killed in New Zealand when crossing the road to or from school buses. At least 47 more have been seriously injured.

20K signs without delay call 15-Dec-2014

Monday, December 15, 2014

Rural Women New Zealand says the recent accident in Canterbury, when a teen was hit crossing the road after getting off a school bus, may have been avoided if the bus had been fitted with flashing 20K signs. Read More

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